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Shots - Health News
3:31 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:07 pm

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes living all over our bodies has almost completely turned around. Now scientists say that not only are those microbes often not harmful, we can't live without them.

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Parallels
3:08 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Would Brits Throw Out Royals With Baby's Bathwater?

Cards depicting the 'royal baby' either as a boy or a girl, specially made by a games company as a publicity stunt are pictured, backdropped by members of the media waiting across the St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London on July 11, 2013.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 3:17 am

"Royal Baby Fever" is gripping Britain.

So say the breathless TV pundits gathered from round the world to report the infant's arrival.

Is it true?

An Ipsos Mori poll published this week found the Royal Family's certainly enjoying a golden age, after rebounding from the disasters of the 1990s — including the death of Princess Diana.

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Law
6:10 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

The Voting Rights Act: Hard-Won Gains, An Uncertain Future

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Feb. 27, 2013, to listen to oral arguments in the Shelby County, Ala., v. Holder voting rights case. In June, the court struck down a key provision of the law that established a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the Justice Department regarding voting procedures.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:21 pm

Access to the polls has not always been assured for all Americans, and before the Voting Rights Act of 1965, many were subjected to so-called literacy tests and poll tax.

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Health
4:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Studies Show Evidence Of Falling Dementia Rates Abroad

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 5:58 pm

As NPR reported in May, the number of Americans with Alzheimer's disease is expected to triple by 2050. But studies published in the last two weeks based in European countries show signs of declining dementia.

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News
4:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Military Sexual Assault Bill Would Reassign Authority

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaks to reporters Tuesday. With her Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. and Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, all of whom have endorsed her bill on military sexual assault.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 5:58 pm

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., is fighting for her bill to curb sexual assaults in the military. Her measure would give independent military prosecutors, rather than commanders, the power to decide which cases should be tried in military court.

Military leaders fiercely oppose moving that authority outside the chain of command, arguing that commanders are responsible for the health and welfare of their soldiers. Removing their authority would undermine their ability to lead, they say.

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Music Interviews
4:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Hüsker Dü's Timekeeper Finds A Lost Paradise

Grant Hart has had an enigmatic career since his days drumming with the influential punk trio Hüsker Dü.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 5:58 pm

In the 1980's, few bands bridged the gap between hardcore punk and what would become alternative rock quite like Minnesota's Hüsker Dü.

The personalities in the trio, however, were not as harmonious, and their partnership dissolved before the decade's end. Guitarist Bob Mould went on to a successful recording career. Bassist Greg Norton dropped out of music and became a chef. And that leaves ... drummer Grant Hart.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Michigan Governor Doesn't Want Bailout For Detroit

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (left) and Detroit's emergency manager Kevyn Orr address Detroit's bankruptcy filing at a news conference on Friday.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he's not expecting the federal government to offer a bailout for bankrupt Detroit and doesn't think it would be a good idea anyway.

Speaking on CBS' Face the Nation on Sunday, Snyder said of a Washington bailout of the Motor City: "I don't expect one."

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

The 100th Tour De France Wraps Up With A Win For The British

Race leader Chris Froome of Great Britain finishes Stage 20 of the 2013 Tour de France. The penultimate stage of the Tour put Froome ahead by 5 minutes and practically guarantees he finishes Sunday in Paris in the yellow jersey.
John Berry Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:04 am

The City of Light is, in fact, lighting up for an evening showdown on the final day of the Tour de France. In a break with tradition, the 21-stage cycling race is starting later than usual from Versailles and ending 83 miles later in Paris with 10 laps of a circuit up and down the Champs-Elysees.

Yet the winners of the 100th Tour de France were pretty much set on Saturday at the end of the 20th stage. For the second year in a row, a Brit is taking the coveted yellow jersey grand prize.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

British Bask In Summer Of Sporting Triumphs

Something to cheer about: Scotland's Andy Murray (second from left) speaks with Britain's Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron (center) after winning the men's title at Wimbledon.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The stars are finally aligning for British sport.

Earlier this month, Andy Murray broke a seven-decade lockout for the British, picking up the men's title at Wimbledon in straight sets against six-time Grand Slam winner Novak Djokovic.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Pope's Visit To Brazil Seen As 'Triumphant Homecoming'

A Brazilian flag flies on Saturday near the podium which will receive Pope Francis on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 7:25 pm

When Pope Francis arrives in Brazil on Monday, he'll begin a trip of firsts.

He's the first Latin American pope, and it will be his first trip abroad as pontiff. And he'll be visiting a country with more Catholics than any other.

Francis, who is gaining a reputation for his simple ways, is expected, The Miami Herald writes, to:

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