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Food
1:05 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Don't Stuff The Turkey And Other Tips From 'America's Test Kitchen'

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 5:24 pm

If there's one Thanksgiving mistake Jack Bishop sees more than any other, it's people rushing to carve their birds. Bishop is editorial director of the public TV series America's Test Kitchen. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "Turkey needs to rest before you carve it ... and a lot fewer juices will end up on the carving board."

Bishop and Bridget Lancaster, also of America's Test Kitchen, share their tips for buying, seasoning and cooking a turkey, and describe some of their favorite side dishes.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

U.S. Flies B-52s Through China's Proclaimed Airspace

Jet diplomacy: A B-52. According to reports, two flew through an area that China now claims is within its air defense zone.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 7:13 pm

"A pair of American B-52 bombers flew over a disputed island chain in the East China Sea" on Monday, according to The Wall Street Journal, "in a direct challenge to China and its establishment of an expanded air-defense zone."

Citing "U.S. officials" as its sources, the Journal adds that Chinese authorities were not told in advance of the planes' flights.

Update at 7 p.m. ET: A Risk For Accidents

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Parallels
12:55 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Once A U.S. Favorite, Hamid Karzai Now Source Of Frustration

Afghan President Hamid Karzai attends the Loya Jirga, or grand assembly, in Kabul on Sunday. The assembly approved a deal that would allow the U.S. to keep troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014. But Karzai has not yet agreed to sign the deal.
Rahmat Gul AP

Back in 2001, the U.S. strongly backed Hamid Karzai as the best man to rebuild Afghanistan after the Taliban had been driven out of power.

Karzai had a solid base among the dominant Pashtun ethnic group. With his fluent English, he seemed at ease with U.S. and other Western leaders. And he appeared reasonable and moderate, in stark contrast to the Taliban's extremism.

Yet today, the Afghan president is a source of endless frustration for the Americans.

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Jury Orders Newegg To Pay $2.3 Million In 'Patent Troll' Case

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 5:47 pm

The online retailer Newegg has lost a patent case centering on Web encryption, after a Texas jury rejected its argument that a claim from the company TQP Development was invalid. The jury ordered Newegg to pay $2.3 million — less than half the damages TQP had sought.

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The Salt
12:31 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Al Gore Goes Vegan, Following In Footsteps Of Bill Clinton

Former Vice President Al Gore has reportedly gone vegan.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:13 pm

The decision to give up entire food groups can be a radical attempt to reform an unhealthy diet, as former President Bill Clinton demonstrated when he revealed in 2011 that he'd gone vegan, after heart bypass surgery.

But more often in this day and age, eschewing animal products is political.

And so that's why we were interested to read that former Vice President Al Gore, one of the world's most famous environmentalists, had — like his former boss — gone vegan, too.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Supreme Court Will Hear New Challenge To Health Law

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear cases brought by companies who say they have religious objections to the Affordable Care Act's requirement that they offer employees health insurance that includes contraception benefits.

In a statement released late Tuesday morning, justices say they have consolidated four related cases and will hear one hour of oral arguments. That will happen next year, likely in late March.

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Parallels
12:17 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Filipino Priest Suffers With His Flock Amid Typhoon's Ruins

A makeshift headstone in the mass grave outside of San Joaquin Parish in the province of Leyte, Philippines. The Catholic parish has lost almost two-thirds of its congregation after Typhoon Haiyan swept through the area.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 8:58 am

Three young men dig a grave in a churchyard in San Joaquin Parish, a collection of about a dozen barrios outside Tacloban, the Philippine provincial capital ravaged by Typhoon Haiyan two weeks ago.

They roll an unidentified body wrapped only in blue plastic sheeting up to the grave on a squeaky trolley.

They drag the body into the pit, which is too small for it. The soft, sandy soil falls from their shovels, and in a minute, the crumpled blue figure disappears under the earth.

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Illinois Judge Allows Same-Sex Couple To Wed Before Law Takes Effect

Vernita Gray (left) and her partner Patricia Ewert had a civil union in Chicago's Millennium Park in June 2011. A judge ruled Monday that they should be allowed to legally marry now because of Gray's health.
Timmy Samuel Lambda Legal

Seven months before Illinois' same-sex marriage law goes into effect, a judge ruled Monday that two Chicago women can marry immediately because one of them has terminal cancer.

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Planet Money
12:07 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

3 Ways Obamacare Is Changing How A Hospital Cares For Patients

John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 10:04 am

The Affordable Care Act is transforming more than health insurance. In hospitals around the country, the legislation could transform the way doctors and nurses actually care for patients.

Part of the law is designed to rein in the nation's exploding health care costs by creating hundreds of little experiments that test new ways for hospitals to save money.

One example: At Summa Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio, doctors are preparing for a new way of doing business.

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Economy
11:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Secretary Of Labor Says Raising Minimum Wage Will Grow Economy

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez has only been in office for a few months, but he's already making waves. He's pushing for a higher minimum wage and immigration reform. Perez speaks with host Michel Martin about his goals for the U.S. labor force.

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