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It's All Politics
10:34 am
Fri December 6, 2013

How Two Similar States Ended Up Worlds Apart In Politics

In this June 2008 photo, the bridge spanning the Mississippi River between Winona, Minn., and the Wisconsin side of the river is closed to traffic.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 11:21 am

Like a lot of neighbors who were once close, Minnesota and Wisconsin have drifted apart over time. Their politics and policy directions are now about as disparate as can be.

That's surprising, not just because the two states share a common climate and culture, but because neither party can claim a big majority of the vote in either state.

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Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013
10:25 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Songwriter Clegg On Mandela, South Africans' 'Bridge'

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ASIMBONANGA")

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're hearing a song that was popular in South Africa in the 1980s, popular even though it was banned. The song was called "Asimbonanga," which means "We Have Not Seen Him." He was Nelson Mandela, who by then had been in prison for more than two decades. This morning we reached the writer of that song, Johnny Clegg, in South Africa.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Eyes Turn To The Fed As Unemployment Rate Falls To 5-Year Low

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 11:41 am

(This post was updated at 10:15 a.m. ET)

The nation's unemployment rate dropped to 7 percent — the lowest mark in five years — and employers added 203,000 jobs to payrolls last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

The latest data could build anticipation that the Federal Reserve might taper its stimulus program.

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The Salt
9:08 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Meat And Booze With A Side Of Still Life: American Painters On Food

tk

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 5:29 pm

In the age of celebrity chef fetishism and competitive ingredient sourcing, it can be hard to remember that there was a time when restaurants didn't exist in America.

Before the Civil War, most people ate at home, consuming mostly what they could forage, barter, butcher or grow in the backyard. But just because food choices were simpler back then doesn't mean our relationship to what we ate was any less complicated.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Fri December 6, 2013

LISTEN: Two Mandela Speeches That Made History

South African National Congress President Nelson Mandela delivers an address in 1990.
Trevor Samson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 12:46 pm

There were two speeches Nelson Mandela delivered that changed the course of history and cemented his legacy as one of the most revered leaders of our time.

The first happened in 1964, when Mandela was put on trial for sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the state. The second is the speech Mandela gave in 1994 when he was inaugurated as president.

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NPR Story
8:22 am
Fri December 6, 2013

DJ Sessions: Eclectic Jazz From New Hampshire

Acoustic double-neck guitarist Ian Ethan Case (Sid Ceaser)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:01 am

For the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions, we speak with Julie Lavender, a jazz musician and host of the pubic radio show “Dream Farm Radio,” which brings jazz musicians to perform at her renovated barn in Hollis, New Hampshire.

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NPR Story
8:22 am
Fri December 6, 2013

'Tough' Volcker Rule Coming Next Week

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew is pictured speaking to reporters, July 21, 2013. (Kostas Tsironis/AP)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:03 am

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew says a “tough” new Volcker Rule is coming next week, as regulators continue the work of regulating financial markets. The new rule would restrict what Lew called “risky bets” by banks.

Financial reform was the topic of Lew’s speech this morning at the Pew Charitable Trusts. He acknowledged that completing the rules that are part of the landmark 2010 Frank Dodd law “have taken longer than we hoped,” but said the U.S. economy is safer today because of the regulations passed after the financial crisis.

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NPR Story
8:22 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Two Universities Struggle To Contain Meningitis Outbreaks

Princeton University is trying to curb an outbreak of bacterial meningitis. The university will offer students a vaccine that hasn't been approved in the U.S., but has been approved in Europe and Australia. (Wikimedia)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:00 am

Two campuses, on opposite coasts, are struggling to contain outbreaks of bacterial meningitis.

Princeton and the University of California, Santa Barbara, are trying to keep their students safe from the potentially fatal sickness.

On Monday, UCSB confirmed that a fourth student is sick. Recently Aaron Loy, a lacrosse player for UCSB, had to have parts of both feet amputated.

Early next week, students at Princeton will be able to get a vaccine, Bexsero, which has been approved in Europe and Australia, but is not fully approved in the U.S.

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Africa
7:48 am
Fri December 6, 2013

For Much Of His Life, Mandela Was A Controversial Figure

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Nelson Mandela is universally admired today, but was a controversial figure for much of his life. To reconstruct what that controversy was about, we turn to Bill Keller. He's a New York Times columnist and former executive editor who once covered South Africa and wrote a youth biography of Mandela. He's on the line.

Mr. Keller, welcome back to the program.

BILL KELLER: Thank you. Nice to be here.

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