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Shortly before last year's election, presidential candidate Donald Trump made a commitment for how he would start off if elected.

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"Marcus Gavius Apicius purchased me on a day hot enough to fry sausage on the market stones."

So begins the tale of Thrasius, the fictional narrator of Feast of Sorrow. Released this week, the novel is based on the real life of ancient Roman noble Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is thought to have inspired and contributed to the world's oldest surviving cookbook, a ten-volume collection titled Apicius.

President Obama signed offshore drilling bans for Arctic and Atlantic areas just before he left office, but President Trump's new executive order could cancel that.

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First-quarter economic growth numbers are out this morning, indicating that GDP underwent the slowest pace of growth in three years. We'll explore what the data points reveal about consumer and business activity. Next, we'll look at the local South LA economy 25 years after the infamous LA riots, which followed the acquittal of several white police officers who were caught on video beating the unarmed black motorist Rodney King. Today, some residents are enjoying a housing boom, but for many, economic conditions haven't improved since 1992.

What makes a high-quality learning program effective not just for the child but the whole family? What else, besides a well-run pre-K, is essential to help families break out of intergenerational poverty?

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And as we were listening to the secretary just now, Joel Wit was listening, too. He's a former U.S. diplomat who once negotiated with North Korea. He's on the line from New York. Good morning.

JOEL WIT: Good morning.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Here is a proposition that may seem self-evident to many people: As societies become more modern, religion loses its grip. People separate their religion from their institutions and from parts of their lives.

Sociologists have a name for this idea. They call it the "secularization thesis." Now, research suggests the story is more complicated.

In 1822, Thomas Jefferson suggested an early version of it, predicting that Unitarianism "will, ere long, be the religion of the majority from north to south."

When President Donald Trump selected retired Marine Gen. James Mattis for defense secretary, it was a rare choice. No recently retired general had been selected for the top Pentagon job since George Marshall, some 66 years earlier.

Gerald Chinchar, a Navy veteran who loves TV Westerns, isn't quite at the end of his life, but the end is probably not far away. The 77-year-old's medications fill a dresser drawer, and congestive heart failure puts him at high risk of emergency room visits and long hospital stays. He fell twice last year, shattering his hip and femur, and now gets around his San Diego home in a wheelchair.

Above all, Chinchar hopes to avoid another long stint in the hospital. He still likes to go watch his grandchildren's sporting events and play blackjack at the casino.

Friday, for the first time since 1983, a sitting president will address the National Rifle Association at the group's annual convention — when President Trump, along with a who's who of gun rights advocates, is scheduled to talk at the NRA Leadership Forum in Atlanta, Ga.

The GDP first estimate for the first quarter is out Friday. President Trump has promised growth of 4 or even 5 percent; his treasury secretary just promised major economic growth in defense of the president’s supply-side tax proposal. But what, realistically, is the first quarter GDP likely to show? Economists are puzzling over a contradiction between what they call “hard” and “soft” data. Reports on consumer and business spending, industrial output — the “hard data — have been pretty mediocre so far this year.

In 1949, Thomas Forkner Sr. was in the real estate business when he helped Joe Rogers Sr. buy a house.

Rogers was working for the Toddle House restaurant chain and he convinced Forkner to join him in starting their own restaurant.

The two opened the first 24-hour Waffle House on Labor Day in 1955 in the Atlanta suburb of Avondale Estates.

By the time they sold the business in the late 1970s, the chain had grown to 400 restaurants.

The Atlanta-based company that owns the chain now has more than 1,500 locations.

The final member of President Trump's Cabinet — secretary of labor — was confirmed by the Senate Thursday in a bipartisan vote of 60-38.

Alexander Acosta, 48, will be the Cabinet's first Latino member. Acosta is dean of the Florida International University College of Law in Miami.

Acosta was assistant attorney general in the U.S. Justice Department's Civil Rights Division under President George W. Bush, who later appointed him U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida.

Fox News has been under fire in the past year for sexual harassment. First Fox chair Roger Ailes, then the network's favorite pundit, Bill O'Reilly, were forced to leave after multiple women complained of unwanted advances—and the blocked advancement they experienced when they didn't put out.

The former Mormon who created a hacktivist website

12 hours ago
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

On Marketplace Tech, we’re taking a deeper look at "hacktivism," activist hackers who use their digital toolkit to push a social agenda. But in their mission to make information more transparent or accessible to all, some hacktivists take a lot of personal risks when they go up against the status quo.

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Bruce Johnson

In our series on "hacktivism," we take a deeper look at how hackers use their digital toolkit to push for a particular agenda. We looked at the debate over Sci Hub, a site that allowed scientific research papers, previously behind a paywall, to be shared with everyone. We heard from John Bohannon, a contributing correspondent for Science Magazine. Below is an edited transcript of his conversation with Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson.

How hacktivism intersects with the law

14 hours ago
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

We’re taking a deeper look at the idea of hacktivism, and how activists use technology to push forward a social or political agenda.

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Marketplace

It's been a busy past few days in the tech world, so we're going to kick off the show by playing "Silicon Tally" — the game where were try to stump people with numbers from the week's tech news. Our guest this Friday: Melissa Kirsch, editor in chief of Lifehacker. Afterwards, we'll look at virtual reality's strong presence at the annual Tribeca Film Festival, and then chat with researcher Molly Sauter about the laws governing cyber crime.

Founder of hacker group LulzSec explains the chaos of hacktivism

14 hours ago
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

The infamous hacking group LulzSec, which aligned itself with Anonymous, was responsible for hacking some high-profile sites and companies like Sony and PBS.  The founder of LulzSec, Hector Monsegur, known by his hacker handle Sabu, now works for Rhino Security Labs, a company that helps businesses assess cybersecurity threats so they can plan to combat them. He talked to Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson for our series on hacktivism. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Is ‘hacktivism’ a force for good … or chaos?

14 hours ago
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Bruce Johnson and Danielle Stephens

We’re taking a deeper look at "hacktivism": how hackers use their digital toolkit to push for a social agenda. There are multiple definitions out in the ether for what hacktivism means. And the definition of "activist" often depends on perspective. One of the first well-known hacktivists from the group Cult of the Dead Cow, Oxblood Ruffin, defined hacktivism as “using technology to improve human rights.

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