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Already this year, more than 6,000 people have illegally walked across the U.S. border into Quebec. Nearly half of them crossed last month. One of the most popular illegal border crossing areas is in Vermont just west of Lake Champlain, along a rural road in the woods.

Vermont Public Radio’s Kathleen Masterson (@kathmasterson) went to the border crossing spot, and has this report.

Selling rhino horn internationally has been illegal for 40 years. But it’s now legal to sell rhino horn within the borders of South Africa, the country with 80 percent of the world’s rhinos. A court there removed a moratorium on the domestic rhino horn trade earlier this year.

As NPR’s Peter Granitz (@pgranitz) reports from the capital, Pretoria, one rhino farmer in South Africa hopes to auction some of his stockpiled rhino horn — and the sale is not without controversy.

Grayson, Kentucky, cafeteria manager Jason Smith didn’t have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith’s dream came true.

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People in West African countries speak hundreds of languages — more than 520 are spoken in Nigeria alone. A lingua franca is a necessity for day-to-day life.

That's where Pidgin comes in. Millions of people speak this informal language, a constantly evolving mix of English and local languages, as a way to overcome language barriers in the region. 

Brent Deppe is taking me on a tour of the farm supply business, called Key Cooperative, that he helps to manage in Grinnell, Iowa. We step though the back door of one warehouse, and our view of the sky is blocked by a gigantic round storage tank, painted white.

"This is the liquid nitrogen tank," Deppe explains. "It's a million-and-a-half gallon tank."

Nitrogen is the essential ingredient for growing corn and most other crops. Farmers around here spread it on their fields by the truckload.

German police stopped a vehicle Saturday night, only to find the father and son inside allegedly hauling a heap of ecstasy. The roughly 5,000 pills packed in a handful of bags had a street value of nearly $46,000, according to authorities in Osnabrück.

A big catch, to be sure — but that's not the weird part. When they took a closer look, they saw a familiar face staring back.

Muslim men in India will no longer be able to terminate their marriages in a matter of moments, after a split decision by the country's Supreme Court overruled the practice of "triple talaq."

Previously, Muslim men (and only men) could irrevocably end their marriages by repeating "talaq," the Arabic word for "divorce," three times. Women's rights advocates in India have fought to end the practice.

Now, three of five judges on the Supreme Court have ruled the practice violates the country's constitutional guarantees of equality.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

It was not until his late 20s that Vincent Doyle discovered that his dead godfather, a priest based central Ireland, was in fact his biological father. And Doyle, a Catholic himself, says that startling discovery inspired in him an abiding mission: to offer support to other children of Roman Catholic priests, who are bound by a vow of celibacy — and to ensure the church supports them, too.

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What if I told you there was a way to use technology to save an estimated $100 billion to $300 billion dollars a year in health care spending in the U.S.? That's the estimated cost incurred because people don't take the medications they're prescribed.

To get a sense of how severe the opioid crisis is in the U.S., you can look at the number of fatal overdoses — more than 33,000 in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That means, on average, 91 people are dying after overdosing on opioids each day. And for every fatal overdose, there are believed to be roughly 30 nonfatal overdoses.

On May 25, 1978, a package exploded at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., injuring a security guard. It was the first of a series of 16 bombings that would occur over the next 17 years, killing three people and injuring many others. The suspect in the case, a shadowy figure who frequently used the U.S. mail to send his homemade explosives, became known as the "Unabomber."

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

President Trump is returning to a red-meat topic for his political base — building a border wall and cracking down on illegal immigration.

Before Trump rallies the faithful in Phoenix (and possibly also faces down protesters) at a campaign rally there Tuesday, he will check out a Predator drone and other equipment used by Customs and Border Protection to track and stop people from entering the country illegally.

President Trump returns Tuesday night to the same Phoenix convention center where he spoke during the campaign last year, laying out a 10-point plan to fight illegal immigration.

He's also visiting a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility in Yuma, Ariz., a few miles from the Southwest border.

Now seven months into his presidency, Trump has pushed for dramatic changes to the nation's immigration system. But he's also been stymied by Congress and by the courts.

A commuter train outside Philadelphia smashed into a parked train car, hurting 42 passengers early Tuesday, but an official said none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The collision happened just after midnight at the 69th Street Terminal Center in Upper Darby, Pa., about 10 miles west of Philadelphia, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority spokeswoman Heather Redfern told Reuters.

The Norristown High Speed Line train was pulling into the station when it hit a second, unoccupied train car. The operator was among those injured, she said.

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President Donald Trump will unveil his strategy for Afghanistan on Monday, putting his mark on America's longest war in his first formal address to the nation since becoming commander in chief. 

Having repeatedly pledged to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan after 16 frustrating years of conflict, Trump looks set to ease his opposition and heed calls from his top generals for the United States to stay the course in his evening speech.

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Last night, at Fort Myer military base just across the river from Washington, D.C., President Trump laid out what he called a path forward in Afghanistan.

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Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says he's "under no illusions" that President Trump will heed a late hour plea to postpone a campaign rally planned in his city for Tuesday night.

"We don't want to cancel the presidential visit overall, but a delay would be the appropriate action by the White House," Stanton said at a news conference Monday afternoon.

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet says Navy divers have found remains of some of the 10 sailors aboard the USS John S. McCain who were missing after the guided-missile destroyer collided with a merchant vessel in waters off Singapore earlier this week.

Adm. Scott Swift said the remains were found in compartments on the ship that were "significantly damaged" in Monday's collision, which left a gaping hole in the ship's port side.

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OASIS: (Singing) Backbeat, the word is on the street that the fire in your heart is out.

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President Trump is in Phoenix, Arizona for a rally where he'll try to score points on immigration and his plans for a border wall. But it turns out hiring border guards is getting harder. On today's show, we'll take a look at some of the reasons for their decline . Afterwards, we'll discuss how consumers have responded to advances in smartphones, and then talk about what could lie on the agenda for Jackson Hole, a meeting between central bankers and policy experts that begins today.

How Did The Chicken Safely Cross The Road?

9 hours ago

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Today the president is in Phoenix, holding a political rally and visiting a town on the border with Mexico. While this administration has pledged to hire 5,000 more border patrol agents, so far that has not improved longstanding recruitment and retention challenges for the agency.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Five years ago, before he was a candidate for president, Donald Trump was pretty sure he knew what to do about Afghanistan. It was a losing proposition, "a complete waste" in terms of "blood and treasure."

"Why are we continuing to train these Afghanis who then shoot our soldiers in the back?" he asked on Twitter in 2012. "Afghanistan is a complete waste. Time to come home!"

More recently, candidate Trump was less certain about exactly when the U.S. should exit the struggle that he had railed against continuing.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Our troops will fight to win. We will fight to win.

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