NPR News & Stories From WUNC

For the first time, scientists have videotaped sharks traveling a 500-mile-long "shark highway" in the Pacific, and they plan to turn it into a protected wildlife corridor in the ocean.

Tuesday's primaries feature Democratic ideological and stylistic battles that could have a major impact on how competitive the party is in the fall general election. Top contests also feature Democratic women competing — sometimes against each other.

The "Stacey vs. Stacey" face-off in Georgia has drawn national attention as Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans run for governor on competing arguments over the best way to compete against Republicans — by just firing up the base or also trying to sway moderates.

China's "professional" pick-up artists

1 hour ago

Qi Dongwei, a 32-year-old mechanical engineer, recalls having an excruciating crush on a classmate back in college. He said he would spend time with her before and after class.

“Our hands had brushed up against each other’s by accident, but I never attempted to hold her hand, not even after chasing her for two years,” Qi said.

He has not had much luck with women since, and the pressure is on.

Fifty years after his LOVE painting made Robert Indiana a sensation, the artist has died at the age of 89.

Indiana's two-row rendering of the word, with its tilted "O," became one of the most recognizable works of modern art in the world. The famous design emerged from deep influences in Indiana's life, from his early exposure to religion to his father's career.

U.S. household debt hit a record $13.2 trillion in the first quarter of 2018, but Americans seem to be handling it okay. Consumer debt levels are stabilizing, according to The New York Fed’s quarterly household debt report. But rising interest rates seem to be squeezing household finances in at least one area: credit card debt.

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The Supreme Court just made class-action lawsuits harder to join

3 hours ago

The Supreme Court has ruled that employees who agreed to settle disputes with the boss through individual arbitration can't later join big class-action lawsuits. 

(U.S. Edition) European politicians will get to grill Facebook CEO later today about the Cambridge Analytica scandal, over a month after U.S. Congress members questioned him. We'll discuss what to expect from his upcoming testimony. Afterwards, we'll talk about why a rising share of American households seem to be having trouble paying off their credit card debt. Plus: As part of our "Divided Decade" series, which looks at the financial crisis 10 years later, we asked 2008 college grads to share lessons about the job market with class of 2018. (05/22/2018)

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Will Sony’s strategy shift shine?

4 hours ago

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Oil prices are heading back toward $80 a barrel thanks to a range of geopolitical and supply factors. In India, fuel costs are a sensitive issue. We’ll explain how the country’s oil minister is working on a way to pressure prices there. Then, Sony announced a big shift in strategy, but will it pay off? It's set to become the world's no. 1 music publisher now that it's purchased EMI Music Publishing for $2.3 billion. Afterward, while the economic decline in Zimbabwe has been well documented, the impact on the country’s industry hasn’t.

At least 10 deaths in the southern Indian state of Kerala are being blamed on an outbreak of the Nipah virus – a disease thought to be transmitted by bats and other animals.

Kerala Health Minister K.K. Shylaja told reporters Tuesday that two other people are in critical condition from Nipah, which has a mortality rate ranging from 40 to 70 percent. There is no vaccine for the disease, which was first seen in Southeast Asia in 1998.

Why privacy settings can't keep your location secret

5 hours ago

Phone carriers collect a minute-by-minute record of everywhere you go. If you use GPS on your phone, that may be obvious. But carriers are also selling that information to companies that don’t do much to keep it secure. One of those companies, Securus Technologies, was hacked this month. Securus gets its information from a company called LocationSmart.

The class of 2008 offers advice to the class of 2018

5 hours ago

Ten years after they graduated during the Great Recession from the University of Central Arkansas, several alumni returned to campus for a roundtable with graduates from the class of 2018. The returnees, now in their 30s, talked about making far less in their first jobs than they’d anticipated. Some moved around a lot early on in their careers – which studies suggest is a better way to boost wages – whereas others stayed put and chose to be more risk-averse during the economic downturn. The most common advice heard at the roundtable: take what you can get in your first job.

Royal Wedding Reception Featured Beer Pong

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Israel's air force commander says recent airstrikes against Iranian targets in Syria were carried out by the F-35 stealth fighter – the first time the newly fielded warplane has been used in an "operational attack."

"The F-35 squadron has become an operational squadron," Maj. Gen. Amikam Norkin said Tuesday, according to Haaretz.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is stirring panic in immigrant communities by moving to limit who can get asylum in the United States. Perhaps no one is more alarmed than one Salvadoran woman living in the Carolinas.

She is known only by her initials in immigration court papers, so her lawyers call her Ms. A.B. She fled to the U.S. four years ago, after enduring more than a decade of domestic abuse in her home country, and requested asylum here.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Routine DNA Screening Moves Into Primary Care

7 hours ago

If you have a genetic mutation that increases your risk for a treatable medical condition, would you want to know? For many people the answer is yes. But typically such information has not been a part of routine primary care.

For patients at Geisinger Health System, that could soon change. Starting in the next month or so, the Pennsylvania-based system will offer DNA sequencing to 1,000 patients, with the goal of eventually extending the offer to all 3 million Geisinger patients.

President Trump meets at the White House Tuesday with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. The two men are partners in an effort to strip North Korea of its nuclear weapons.

The meeting is a chance for Trump and Moon to strategize before a planned summit next month in Singapore with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

That meeting has been called into question, after North Korea suggested it's not willing to give up its nuclear weapons. For now, the U.S. and South Korea are proceeding on the assumption the meeting will take place.

It's a financial nightmare for public school teachers across the country: Federal grants they received to work in low-income schools were converted to thousands of dollars in loans that they now must pay back.

As Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt has moved to roll back a sweeping array of Obama-era regulations he's relentlessly cited his goal of providing "regulatory certainty."

In his first address to career employees last year he told the gathered room at the EPA, "Regulators exist to give certainty to those that they regulate. Those that we regulate ought to know what we expect of them, so that they can plan and allocate resources to comply."

President Trump has signed new economic sanctions against Venezuela a day after the country's socialist president, Nicolás Maduro, won elections that have been widely condemned as fraudulent.

The U.S. order would clamp down on the South American country's ability to liquidate assets, but the Trump administration fell short of imposing threatened new oil sanctions.

Trump said the executive order would prevent Venezuela's government from conducting "fire sales" of its assets.

"[This] money belongs to the Venezuelan people," he said.

Former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama have signed a multiyear deal to form their own production company and provide content to Netflix.

Netflix said in a statement that the Obamas would "produce a diverse mix of content – including docu-series, documentaries and features" under their imprint, Higher Ground Productions.

Archbishop of Adelaide Philip Wilson has been found guilty of concealing child sex abuse by a fellow priest that he first learned of in the 1970s.

A California startup that sought revolutionize audio headphones, promising personalized devices that would produce sound "indistinguishable from reality," has found that raising interest among investors was easier than delivering the goods.

Ossic raised more than $3.2 million in crowdfunding for its Ossic X, which it touted as the "first 3D audio headphones calibrated to you."

German parents are getting busted for taking their kids on vacation when they should be in school.

Police have launched investigations into more than 20 families who were caught playing hooky ahead of a three-day weekend that started on May 19, German newspaper Der Spiegel reported.

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