Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world including the mobilization of massive circumcision drives in Kenya; how Botswana, with one of the highest rates of HIV in the world, has managed to provide free, life-saving drugs to almost all who need them; and why Brazil's once model HIV/AIDS program is seen in decline.

Prior to moving into this assignment in 2012, Beaubien spent four years a NPR foreign correspondent covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. From his base in Mexico City, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, hurricanes in Haiti, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

Politics & Government
9:15 am
Thu August 30, 2012

NC Delegates Await Romney's Big Speech At RNC

In Tampa, Republicans are eagerly awaiting Mitt Romney's big speech tonight. Attendees at the Republican National Convention were enthused by Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan's speech last night and North Carolina's delegates were no exception. Helen Eckman from Beaufort County says she likes Ryan's promise that if he and Mitt Romney are elected, they'll limit federal spending.  She wants Romney to adopt much of the budget Ryan proposed in the U.S. House.

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Politics & Government
8:00 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Independents Wary Of Conventions

North Carolina has one of the fastest growing groups of independent voters in the country. About one quarter of the state's registered voters are unaffiliated. And those unaffiliated voters are expected to play a big role in determining the outcome of the presidential race. About a year ago, a group of unaffiliated voters formed a new non-partisan organization called North Carolina Independents. Jessica Jones met with three of its members to see what they think of this week's Republican National Convention.

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Health
7:20 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Duke Faculty Train Rwanda Health Providers

Doctors and nurses from Duke University are training medical professionals in Rwanda, and helping the African nation build a sustainable health care system. Duke is among several American academic institutions participating in the U.S.-government-funded program.

Catherine Gilliss is Dean of Duke's Nursing School. She says the objective is to train nurses in Rwanda to deliver more sophisticated care.

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David Aquila ("Quil") Lawrence is an award-winning correspondent for NPR News, covering the millions of Americans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as they transition to life back at home.

Previously, Lawrence served as NPR's Bureau Chief in Kabul. He joined NPR in 2009 as Baghdad Bureau Chief – capping off ten years of reporting in Iraq and all the bordering countries. That experience made the foundation for his first book Invisible Nation: How the Kurds' Quest for Statehood is Shaping Iraq and the Middle East, published in 2008.

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

A former NPR Moscow bureau chief, Michele Kelemen now covers the State Department and Washington's diplomatic corps. Her reports can be heard on all NPR News programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

In her latest beat, Kelemen has been traveling with Secretary of State John Kerry and Hillary Clinton before him, tracking the Obama administration's broad foreign policy agenda from Asia to the Middle East. She also followed President Bush's Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and was part of the NPR team that won the 2007 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of the war in Iraq.

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

Business & Economy
4:45 pm
Wed August 29, 2012

Controversy Over Proposed Chicken Plant In Nash County

Some Nash County residents are fighting to stop a chicken processing plant from coming to their area.

Gurnal Scott: Sanderson Farms already has a presence in Kinston.  Now it wants to bring a large poultry plant to Nash County. The Carolinas Gateway Partnership -- an economic development group -- is helping Sanderson. Partnership C-E-O John Gessaman says the company wants to go beyond its employment promise

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Beijing Correspondent Louisa Lim is currently attending the University of Michigan as a Knight-Wallace Fellow. She will return to her regular role in 2014.

Based in Beijing, NPR foreign correspondent Louisa Lim finds China a hugely diverse, vibrant, fascinating place. "Everywhere you look and everyone you talk to has a fascinating story," she notes, adding that she's "spoiled with choices" of stories to cover. In her reports, Lim takes "NPR listeners to places they never knew existed. I want to give them an idea of how China is changing and what that might mean for them."

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