State of Things
10:47 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Wake Forest Debate

Many voters are looking forward to the Presidential debates this election year, but competitive debaters might say that the civil discourse of our times has given up on formal argumentation. True debate depends on a certain openness and on the possibility that minds can change on the strength of a well-crafted argument. Wake Forest University has an award-winning debate team and their members are already preparing for the upcoming season.

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State of Things
10:34 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Sayonara to Hello

www.stevemania.com/

In 2011, magician Steve Marshall was living in Japan. That year, a deadly earthquake and tsunami struck and Marshall found it hard to get work in the aftermath of those disasters. He decided to take a magic tour across the United States to raise some cash.

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State of Things
10:26 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Doug Largent Trio

Doug Largent has had a long career as a professional musician playing the bass. But in 2009, he decided to pursue his real dream: learning to play the organ. Soon after, he formed a jazz trio and they have a new CD called “Right in the Pocket” coming out. Host Frank Stasio talks to the Doug Largent Trio about their music, and they play live in the studio.

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Business & Economy
6:00 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Some Growth For Greensboro Economy

Across the state elected officials, business leaders and job seekers continue to monitor unemployment rates, local economic growth and job opportunities. In Greensboro the Chamber of Commerce touted some good news this week, hoping to spark a little optimism. Jeff Tiberii reports there are signs of improvement, but also lingering problems in the workforce.

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Education
5:40 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Youth Radio Institute: Akib Khan

Akib Khan

On Fridays we've been listening to a series produced by young people involved in WUNC's first ever Summer Youth Radio Institute. This week 15-year-old Akib Khan tells the story of his sister, who decided to start wearing the hijab, the traditional Islamic headscarf, when the family immigrated to the United States from Bangladesh. As our youth reporter tells us it's a decision that was met with some skepticism.

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Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR. Since joining NPR in 1992, Palca has covered a range of science topics — everything from biomedical research to astronomy. He is currently focused on the eponymous series, "Joe's Big Idea." Stories in the series explore the minds and motivations of scientists and inventors.

Palca began his journalism career in television in 1982, working as a health producer for the CBS affiliate in Washington, DC. In 1986, he left television for a seven-year stint as a print journalist, first as the Washington news editor for Nature, and then as a senior correspondent forScience Magazine.

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