This long holiday shopping weekend is expected to out pace last year. And that includes online shopping.  Scot Wingo likes to track what is called – Cyber Monday – how much money online shoppers spend during the holiday weekend.  Wingo is C-E-O of Channel Advisor. The Morrisville-based company works with over three-thousand online retailers on how to be more efficient and make more money.

Wingo expects double digit online shopping growth:

Spaulding family seal

About 700 members of the Spaulding family will descend on Raleigh, NC next week for the clan’s 18th bi-annual reunion. The Spauldings can trace their roots to Duplin County where Benjamin Spaulding, a freed slave, married Edith Delphi Jacobs, a Lumbee Indian, in the early 19th century. The Spauldings have ties to the founding and success of dozens of the state’s institutions like North Carolina Mutual Life insurance company, Mechanics & Farmers Bank and Lincoln Hospital.

Waste 2 Watts To Power Medical Devices

Jul 2, 2010

In the past, global health work tended to be limited to doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. But engineering plays a role in health care around the world. From infrastructure projects, to supporting medical equipment, engineers are becoming an essential part of the global health landscape.

FHI worker Joseph Galloway detects holes in condoms by filling them with water.
Rose Hoban

When people think of global health, they might picture heroic doctors or selfless nurses. But many others work behind the scenes in global health, doing work that’s much less sexy, but equally essential.  Some of those people work here in the Triangle in a lab that tests life-preserving and life-saving products shipped around the world. Central to their work is testing condoms for safety and effectiveness.  In the next installment of our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home, Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

Cross-Cultural Research Provides Links to Durham

Jun 30, 2010
Study Coordinator Randy Rogers at Juneteenth Festival with research associates Kim Gibson and Alexandria Horne
Rose Hoban

Drug treatments for HIV have given new hope to patients with the virus. But the Holy Grail for researchers is finding a way to prevent HIV from being transmitted in the first place. Scientists are testing vaccines, drugs, gels that kill the virus – all without success. The only way to prevent HIV transmission – still – is to convince people to change their behavior. And that’s not easy.  A group of people in Durham are trying to find better methods for HIV prevention – and they’re using techniques refined by researchers working in other cultures.

Dr Phyllis Crain and one of the residence counselors talks with a boy outside a cottage at Crossnore.
Rose Hoban

When you say the word ‘orphanage’ what comes to mind for many people, are gloomy places of abuse and neglect, where kids are warehoused after losing family. For years, the assumption has been that foster families provide better care for kids in need than any institution could. But new research from overseas is challenging those beliefs – findings that kids in orphanages can do as well or better as kids taken into families. Now, that research is being embraced in the U S. And it’s starting to influence the policy dialogue about what to do with kids who need care outside their homes. 

Taste Of Place

Jun 23, 2010

Certain places are known for their indigenous foods. Vidalia, Ga. grows sweet onions. The banks of the Indian River in Florida produce outstanding citrus fruits. In some cases, governments go as far as to designate these special places with geographical indications. But what makes some geographical indications associated with certain foods and drink profitable for the farmers and producers in that area? N.C.

Chaka Khan! Chaka Khan! It’s a name that just rolls off your tongue.  The famous R & B and “funk” superstar has a voice that has mesmerized fans for decades with its range and flexibility.  And who can forget the feathers and the hair!   Chaka Khan takes the stage in Durham this weekend.

Eric Hodge hosts a one-hour digest of the Energy Series stories that aired April 12-23, 2010 .

App State Profesor Dennis Scanlin and wind turbine
Dennis Scanlin

North Carolina could get most of the energy it needs as a state from renewable sources including solar and wind. That's according to a report published earlier this year by the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. But when it comes to producing wind energy that goes back into the grid, North Carolina is behind other states. In fact, there is only one utility-grade wind turbine in all of North Carolina. Jessica Jones reports for our series, North Carolina Voices:  Tomorrow's Energy.

A solar panel, renewable energy

Over the last three years, North Carolina has seen exponential growth in the use of solar power- from a few panels on homeowners' roofs to heat hot water to large installations that produce energy and send it right back into the grid. Small business owners working in the industry believe what they're doing is good for the state and for the environment. But right now, their prospects are limited. Jessica Jones reports for our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow's Energy.

Consert CEO Jack Roberts
Jack Roberts

New businesses to help save the planet are popping up everyday.  As a result, your ability to do environmental good may be closer to your finger tips than you think.  Already, there are pockets of households and businesses in North Carolina that are able to control their heaters and air conditioners online or from their smart phones.  They're living on a Smart Grid - that's becoming smarter and smarter every day.

As part of our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow's Energy, reporter Leoneda Inge has the story of one smart grid pilot project in Fayetteville.

Behind the Reporting: 'Tomorrow’s Energy'

Apr 20, 2010

If you’ve been tuned in to Morning Edition this past week or so, you’ve been hearing a series of reports about energy from WUNC’s reporters. The series, “North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow’s Energy,” addresses where North Carolinians currently get their power and where we’ll get it in the future. A lot of work goes into those six or seven-minute radio reports, which means a lot also gets left out. The melody of a coal-fired power plant and the sculptural beauty of a wind turbine are among the details of the reporting that didn’t make it on the air. On today’s show, we’ll talk with WUNC reporters Dave DeWitt, Leoneda Inge, Jessica Jones and Laura Leslie about what they took away from their reporting and what else is left to say about powering North Carolina’s future.

Durham Sustainability Manager Tobin Freid
Tobin Freid

North Carolina has topped many lists in the past few years.  It's one of the fastest growing states and ranks high for its business climate.  But in energy efficiency, NC is wading somewhere in the middle of the pack nationwide.

Universities like UNC Chapel Hill, Duke, and NC State are among the largest electricity users in the state. Some produce their own power, some buy their electricity from utility companies. And all have student bodies that are vocal in their anxiety over global warming.

As part of our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow’s Energy, Dave DeWitt looks at how campuses are transforming to meet their future energy challenges.