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Members of the Minnesota based band, Trampled by Turtles
Trampled by Turtles

Trampled By Turtles hails from way up north in Duluth, Minnesota. The band got its start in 2003 bringing a unique spin to Americana instrumentation with lyrics inspired by a sense of reverence for the countryside just outside their town.

The band is playing in Raleigh at the Red Hat Amphitheater Saturday as part of the Band Together event that helps raise money for various non-profits around the Triangle.

Morning Edition Host Eric Hodge spoke with the band's fiddle player and singer Ryan Young:

RDU, Paris, Delta Air Lines
Leoneda Inge

The new non-stop Delta Air Lines flight to Paris, France from Raleigh-Durham International Airport took off without a hitch Thursday night.

Community and business leaders celebrated along with Delta staff.  They say the Paris flight is a sign North Carolina’s economy has rebounded since the recession, and is growing.

The Delta Air Lines, RDU, Paris party consumed at least four gates. There were balloons, sweets from Cary’s La Farm Bakery and lots of pictures.  But the real action was at gate C-15 as passengers prepared to board their flight to Paris.

A SolarBee
Medora Corporation

The Department of Environmental Quality has pulled the plug on SolarBees.

DEQ says it's removing the devices from Jordan Lake. SolarBees have been churning water at several spots on the lake in an attempt to reduce algae blooms, but a report from DEQ says there has been no improvement in water quality. 

The agency is reevaluating other measures that would limit runoff from the surrounding area, but developers are pushing back. 

An image of Duke anthropology professor J. Lorand Matory
J. Lorand Matory

Ethnic identity can be shaped by cultural practices and heritage. But in his new book, Stigma and Culture: Last-Place Anxiety in Black America (The University of Chicago Press/2015)

Nedda Ibrahim

More than 100,000 Iraqi refugees have resettled in the United States in the past decade. But for the most part their stories are underreported and their life experiences are invisible to the wider American public. An art exhibit on view at William Peace University this weekend tries to change that by shining light on the work of 10 refugee artists whose work represents the rich and storied history of Iraqi art, and the diverse experiences of Iraqi refugees settled in the Americas.

Rev. William Barber
NAACP / http://www.naacpnc.org/president

The North Carolina NAACP says Harnett County Sheriff's Office targets poor, rural residents. Now, the organization is calling on the U.S. Department of Justice for a thorough investigation.

The DOJ is already looking into the killing of a man by a deputy intending to search a home without a warrant, and the possible mishandling of another murder investigation.

NC House Democrats Seek to Expand State LGBT Protections

May 11, 2016
rainbow flag
Ted via Flickr/Creative Commons

Democrats in the North Carolina House have filed a bill to expand state protections to include sexual orientation, gender identity, veteran status and familial status.

Greensboro Representative Chris Sgro is one of the sponsors of House Bill 1078, dubbed the “Equality for All Act”.  He called it the most comprehensive set of non-discrimination protections ever introduced in the General Assembly.

A red wolf
Joan Lopez via Flickr/Creative Commons

An endangered red wolf pup has been born at the North Carolina Zoo.

The sole pup is the sixth litter of red wolves born at the zoo, but the first since 2010.

The Old Ceremony
Daniel Coston / http://www.theoldceremony.com/

WUNC's Back Porch Music on the Lawn series kicks off another season of free concerts at American Tobacco in Durham with Thursday night's show featuring The Old Ceremony and The Backsliders. The concert is at 6 p.m. and is family and pet-friendly.

Craig Duffy / Flickr

From "The Godfather" series to "Pulp Fiction," some of the greatest films of all time are about crimes and the people who commit them.

Movie lovers are drawn to fascinating characters like Scarface and Hannibal Lecter. Hollywood has driven good people to love bad characters for generations.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about listeners' favorite crime films in the next edition of "Movies on the Radio."

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