News

WUNC Takes Home Five Murrow Awards

Apr 25, 2017

The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) has awarded WUNC five Edward R. Murrow Awards, including the regional award in overall excellence.

Phil Freelon, Architect, ALS
Jeffrey Camarati / Courtesy of PNC

Phil Freelon is one of the most acclaimed African-American architects of his generation. While his work is known nationwide, he's called the Triangle home for many years. It’s where the NC State graduate raised his family and built his firm.

Now, business and civic leaders and friends are mostly just celebrating Freelon, after he was diagnosed with ALS last year.

Morning on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore
Outer Banks Real Estate / Flickr Creative Commons

Businesses on the Outer Banks are preparing for an annual influx of international students who spend their summers working along the barrier islands. 

a photo of an aedes aegypi mosquito
James Gathany / Flickr Creative Commons

Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and Duke University have received a $3 million grant to conduct Zika research.

Housing
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A new report ranks Raleigh 22nd among 50 U.S. cities in terms of housing affordability for teachers. Charlotte ranked 30th. The analysis compared average rent in each city to local teacher salaries.

Courtesy Cliff Missen

People with few means but big hearts stepped in to help Cliff Missen as he transitioned in and out of foster care as a child. When he turned 18, Missen made a vow to pay it forward and live a life in ​service of the poor. He made good on that promise when he brought well-drilling technology to rural villages in Liberia and an information technology program to Joss, Nigeria.

The nightly call-in program Indivisible wraps up its 100 Day run on WUNC on Thursday April 27th.   In addition to insightful interviews with lawmakers and opinion leaders, Indivisible gave listeners the chance to engage.  Every night the program's hosts opened up the phones and encouraged Americans to talk to one another.  

sign with bus
Photo Courtesy of Tina Haver Currin, by Josh Steadman

Drivers in the area may notice an outcropping of signs that say "Welcome to Raleigh, Y'all." The yard signs and murals give the greeting in 17 languages. The creators say it's a welcome message to people of different cultures.

Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority

The Raleigh-Durham International Airport will begin renovations on its central parking garage on April 24 and will continue through the end of the year. Airport officials recommend travelers arrive two hours early this summer.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNC Politics Podcast, a conversation with long-time political reporter Mark Binker.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a conversation about the projected effects of tax cuts, a constitutional challenge to the General Assembly, judicial restructuring and a failed craft beer proposal.

By Source - Fair use March for Science

Tens of thousands of scientists are expected to descend on Washington, D.C., this Saturday for the March for Science. Partner marches are set up in more than 500 cities around the world to bring together scientists and science supporters. Threats to budget cuts at the National Institutes of Health, and the Trump administration’s position on scientific research have galvanized the march movement.

children reading
U.S. Navy / Wikimedia Commons

In North Carolina, more kids are aging out of the foster care system without permanent families. That number has been on the rise for more than a decade, but it spiked again last year.

Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing

In his latest novel, “The Moon and The Other” (Simon & Schuster/2017), science fiction writer John Kessel envisions a collection of people living on the moon in the middle of the 22nd century. The story follows four main characters as they navigate the social structures of each colony, including the “Society of Cousins,” where men receive societal privileges but are denied the right to vote.

 

Courtesy North Carolina Opera

Georges Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” is an opera that pits the dynamics of a love triangle against the union of brotherhood. The opera, set in historic Sri Lanka, then Ceylon, features one of the most famous duets in opera history. The North Carolina Opera presents their interpretation of “The Pearl Fishers,” an opera that was only popularized long after Bizet’s death.

Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Louisiana governor Huey P. Long is a legendary character in his state's history. This week's Criminal Podcast looks at the mysterious death of Governor Long, a controversial character with a big persona.

A picture of High Point Market.
High Point Market Authority

When House Bill 2, also known as the “bathroom bill,” passed last year, it caused some businesses in the state to lose customers and revenue. Now, officials with the biannual High Point Market hope they’ll see an increase in attendees this year.

social media icons
Blogtrepreneur / Flickr, Creative Commons

It’s now a crime for sailors or Marines to post nude photos of service members without their consent.

The measure is the Navy’s latest response to a scandal involving a private Facebook group used by male Marines and veterans.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Since at least the 1990s, partisan politics haven’t had a place in most school board races in North Carolina. Historically, just a small minority of state’s 112 school boards have been elected on a partisan basis. But that may be changing. In the last five years, the state legislature has more than doubled the number of school boards elected on party lines.

Friday night at the Carolina Theatre in Durham, the Cat's Cradle presents the North Carolina premiere of the concert film "Thank You, Friends." The movie's name comes from a Big Star song from Third (the band's third album). The movie documents an on-going, star-studded tribute to the band.

The 2017 election laid bare stark divisions between urban and rural areas of the United States, and North Carolina was no exception. While highly-regarded research universities and the creation of Research Triangle Park helped turn the state’s economy around in the 1950s, they also created an economic and political wedge that continues to grow to this day.

Nina Honeycutt and Elizabeth Anderson

 Social workers are often embedded with populations who are ignored and marginalized. A group of social work students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wanted to break down the divide and find a way to introduce some of these individuals to the wider community. They collected personal testimonies from 18 individuals from all walks of life with the hope that these narratives will increase awareness and compassion for those who are often silenced. 

Sufis Doucet

For Durham-based architect Phil Freelon, 2016 was a year of triumphs and setbacks. Freelon was the lead architect for the National Museum of African American History & Culture and celebrated the museum’s opening in Washington D.C. last fall. But months before the opening, Freelon was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Dom (left) and Jerron backstage at a Tribute to LeadBelly at Carnegie Hall in February 2016
Vania Kindard

The young folk musician Jerron Paxton defies easy categorization.  He grew up in a west coast metropolis, but his family and community adhered to customs from the rural south. And, like a number of people in Los Angeles with Louisiana roots, he inherited a combination of African-American, American Indian, and Jewish heritage. Paxton plays acoustic music that reflects these origins, with a focus on solo fiddle, guitar, and banjo. He also has a passion for telling his family’s story: 

Michael O'Brien

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time, Eric Hodge sits down with Jody Stephens of Big Star to discuss the band's classic song 'September Gurls.'

Blue Ridge Community College hopes to offer a degree in craft beer brewing starting this fall.
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr, Creative Commons

Lawmakers are abandoning efforts to increase the self-distribution limit for craft brewers.

school bus
Shinichi Sugiyama / Flickr, Creative Commons

A bi-partisan bill would make it easier for charter schools in North Carolina to get disadvantaged students to class.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

A statewide non-profit and 10 North Carolina citizens are suing the Republican-led Legislature over a special session held last year to pass laws that eroded the governor's power.

Joe Wolf / Flickr Creative Commons

Dystopian films take viewers to cities in the sky and barren, post-apocalyptic landscapes. They explore futuristic universes while also tapping into the darker side of the human condition. 

In this episode of "Movies on the Radio," listeners discuss their favorite dystopian films. Host Frank Stasio talks with experts Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about how dystopian art emerges from societal reaction to politics and government.

Laura Boyes will host a screening of the 1930 Film "King of Jazz" at Friday, April 21 at 8 p.m. at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. 

And on May 5, you can catch Marsha Gordon at a special screening of The Big Red One at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. 

sick person thermometer
Claus Rebler / Flickr, Creative Commons

A new phone app that tracks the spread of illnesses in school age children is gaining popularity in the Triad.

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