News

Energy companies are predicting that the need for power will grow in North Carolina in the coming years. With climate legislation likely, they are turning back to an energy source that has been put on the back burner for several decade: nuclear.

In February, President Obama announced 8 billion dollars in loan guarantees for a Georgia utility company hoping to build new nuclear reactors. Progress Energy and Duke Energy both have plans to also build new nuclear to serve customers in North Carolina.

Don de Leaumont Plays Live In Studio

Nov 20, 2009
Don de Leaumont
dononthewb.com

Singer-songwriter Don de Leaumont’s music is part storytelling, part folksy warmth and insight. In October, he released his fifth solo album, called “Planes, Trains, Crickets and Central Air.” Now a resident of Atlanta, Georgia, Don returns to his longtime home of Chapel Hill for a gig at The Cave.

He joins host Frank Stasio in the studio to play some tunes and discuss how he broke his heavy metal addiction.

Picture of Russian Duo: Terry Boyarsky & Oleg Kruglyakov
russianduo.com

The balalaika is a traditional Russian instrument with three strings and a triangular body. Oleg Kruglyakov, a native of Omsk City, Siberia, has been playing the balalaika since he was seven years old. Now, he's devoted to educating other cultures about Russian folk music and testing the limits of his instrument by teaming up with pianist Terry Boyarsky.

Cassilhaus
Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly

A love of collecting photography led Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly to include an art gallery in their dream home. Then the couple decided that they wanted to do more than just display art. They wanted to build an in-home studio space for artists to create in. Cassilhaus, the name of Frank and Ellen's dwelling, fulfilled their dream. Now, invited artists from all over the world come to their home to write, paint, sculpt, dance or just generate ideas for upcoming projects.

Jewish-American Identity & Food

Mar 26, 2009

A lot of what we cook defines us. Say "barbecue and sweet tea" and people hear, "the South." The same is true for immigrants. As hyphenated Americans we are what we eat. This will be the subject of an upcoming lecture by Nora Rubel, an assistant professor of religion and classics at the University of Rochester in New York. Rubel earned her graduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and returns next week talk about "The Settlement Cookbook and the Transformation of Jewish-American Identity." But first she joins guest host Laura Leslie with a preview.

In the late 1800s, North Carolina's favorite mountain retreat was home to a progressive African-American community that founded the Young Men's Institute. It remains the country's oldest free-standing African-American community center.

Joe Thompson At 90

Dec 9, 2008
David Persoff

Legendary North Carolina fiddler Joe Thompson turns 90-years-old today. He is widely recognized as being the last living link to a time when African American String Bands played for square dances nearly every weekend around here. Thompson's toured the world with his music and is still playing, but now mostly, at home with friends and neighbors.

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Holy Smoke

Nov 12, 2008

Most traditions have plenty of people, history and folklore to back them up. Carolina barbecue is no different. A new book called, "Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue" explores the Tar Heel tradition - past and present.

Jazz artist Branford Marsalis
courtesy of the artist

Saxophone master and Durham resident Branford Marsalis has never shied away from a challenge when it comes to tackling music.  The jazz legend's latest undertaking incorporates his sax into the classical music traditions of South America in a show called "Marsalis Brasilianos: Villa Lobos, Milhaud and the New Worlds of Brazilian Modernism."  

Smithfield Foods and the United Food and Commercial Workers settled a federal racketeering lawsuit this week. Now the nearly five thousand workers at the plant in Tar Heel will have another chance to vote on union representation.

Love And Gasoline

Sep 19, 2008

Love may make the world go around, but sometimes it may need a little gasoline to keep it going. North Carolina Public Radio asked listeners how the year's dramatic rise in gasoline prices has affected their personal lives.

Jan Boxill grew up playing football with her 11 siblings at a time when girls weren’t even allowed to march in the band because it was too strenuous. She went on to help found her college basketball team, and later became a college coach. For more than 20 years Jan served as the Public Address Announcer for Women’s Basketball at UNC and was even an announcer at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Alvin and Omelia Garner
Leoneda Inge

On this day - June 23, 40 years ago, the first interracial couple in Orange County was married. Alvin and Omelia Garner got their marriage license a year after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws forbidding such unions. To mark this year’s anniversary, the Garners decided to celebrate in style and have the wedding they never had.

Church of Living God2,  2007 photograph by John Rosenthal
John Rosenthal

John Rosenthal is renowned for his black and white photographs of New York City in the 1970s. The photos archived parts of the city that were vanishing and eventually disappeared: a dusty model of a ship in a bottle in the window of a social club in Little Italy, for example, or seltzer bottles stacked in wood crates.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 29, 2008

As Wake county grows, more and more major transit arteries are slowing to a crawl. Some say the answer is more roads. Others say it’s fewer cars. And Triangle commuters are literally stuck in the middle.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 28, 2008

As a part of our ongoing coverage of Growth and Sustainability -- this week on Morning Edition we're featuring a North Carolina Voices series on Transportation. One form of transit stands out for it’s energy efficiency, health benefits and fun – that’s people-powered transportation. But in the Triangle, that can be tough. It’s a place that’s been built primarily for cars -- and many bikers says it’s just too dangerous to consider getting to work on two wheels or feet.

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

Raleigh is growing. That statement is not news to anyone who's tried to get across town at rush hour. More people often does mean more traffic and longer commutes. As a part of our on-going coverage of growth and sustainability -- today we begin a North Carolina Voices series that looks at how the Triangle area will meet the transportation needs of a rapidly growing population. We begin with Eric Hodge's conversation with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.

The fight between Smithfield and the United Food and Commercial Workers over unionizing the Tar Heel hog processing plant has entered a new phase. A federal judge in Virginia has allowed a lawsuit filed by Smithfield to go forward.

The suit accuses the UFCW of a coordinated public smear campaign.  It uses the RICO statutes that were created to fight organized crime. The lawsuit is the latest step in a confrontation that has slowly been moving out of the plant itself and into the kitchens and living rooms of consumers.

NC Voices: Health Of Elders

Oct 16, 2007

People are living longer now than ever before in human history. By the year 2030, more than one-in-five people in the United States will be over the age of 65. The dream is to stay healthy into a ripe old age and die peacefully in your sleep. But the reality is likely to be quite different. Many people go through a long physical and mental decline before they die. As we wrap up our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 5

Oct 16, 2007

As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we’ve been reporting on the remarkable rise of Type 2 diabetes. That rise is due mostly to obesity; Emily Hanford traveled to two schools in eastern North Carolina to try to find out why it's such a problem -- and what's being done about it.

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Oct 15, 2007

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 4

Oct 15, 2007

Type-2 diabetes may be the plague of this century. Just 20 years ago, about 30 million people in the world had the disease. Today, it’s more than five times that many. It’s a frightening prospect for health, and the health care system. Here in North Carolina, diabetes is already a direct or contributing cause in one out of every five hospitalizations. That’s billions of dollars of every year. Experts say health care providers need more effective ways to treat diabetics so they don’t end up in the hospital. A group of clinics in eastern North Carolina is trying to do it with a new model for treating chronic disease.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 3

Oct 12, 2007

This week we're focusing on health care and the rise of diabetes in northeastern North Carolina. Yesterday we met Miranda Cofield, a 50 year old woman who recently lost her health insurance. She's African American, and she's poor. These factors put her at high risk of developing complications from diabetes. Statistically, Sterling Hamilton does not face the same risks.

NC Voices: Greener Hospitals

Oct 11, 2007

This week we’re examining the health care system and asking whether it actually promotes good health. Today, we look at health care facilities themselves. From toxic chemicals and medical waste, to round-the-clock energy and water use, the way hospitals are built and maintained can have serious effects on the patients inside and on the environment beyond. So as the population ages and hospital construction booms, the health care industry is examining the central creed of medicine "to do no harm" and applying it the environment too.

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