News

photo of john bolton speaking at a podium
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Former President Jimmy Carter called John Bolton a “war-like” figure who has advocated for attacks against Iraq, Iran and a pre-emptive strike against North Korea. He considers Donald Trump’s choice for national security adviser “a disaster for our country.”

 

photo of the entrance to the 12 x 12 exhibit, detailing the artists and their work
Courtesy of SECCA

Music is the first thing visitors experience at the 12X12 exhibition at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem. They hear one note played over and over again. This singular sound sets the tone for “12X12: 12 Artists from the 12th State,” an exhibition that brings together a group of artists from various backgrounds and artistic practices with one thing in common: North Carolina.

photo of three men playing horns for a huge crowd
Courtesy of the Louis Armstrong House Museum

During the Cold War, the U.S. Department of State sent jazz musicians around the world to sell the American way of life. This initiative took place in the 1950s, during segregation and the beginning of the civil rights movement. Jazz was gaining popularity on the international stage partly because of a Voice of America program hosted by Willis Conover, and partly because jazz musicians, like Louis Armstrong, played international tours.

crab pots
Darren Pullen / Flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/2frpk5

Commercial fishermen retrieved 3,500 lost crab pots from coastal waters this winter. Storms and boating can cause buoys to separate from these wire cages, which makes the traps hard to find.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – WUNC today announces their selection to participate in Guns & America, a two-year, national reporting collaborative of 10 public media stations, funded by a $5.3 million grant from The Kendeda Fund. The collaboration includes the launch of the first-of-its-kind Audion Fellowship, a program that will train and empower a diverse corps of innovative, cross-platform journalists to cover difficult and divisive topics and lead the public media system.

To Jayla Hagans, a student organizer in Raleigh, school resource officers represent a big shift in school discipline that has disproportionately impacted students of color.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

This August, students at four elementary schools in rural Stanly County will return from summer vacation to fresh pencils, notebooks, and signs announcing the presence of armed officers on campus.

School founders Philip Hanes, left, and John Elhle, with wives, Rosemary Harris and Charlotte Hanes.
Courtesy of UNCSA

John Ehle, an award-winning writer who helped develop what is now the UNC School of the Arts, has died. He was 92.

photo of ava duvernay signing posters for fans
Alex J. Berliner / ABImages

With the new Disney release “A Wrinkle In Time,” Ava DuVernay became the first African-American woman to direct a film with a budget over $100 million. She notes the accomplishment but calls it bittersweet, because it has taken Hollywood until 2018 to support women of color in these roles. 

Nick Lowe
William Ellis

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

Over the past few weeks we've been featuring artists from Yep Roc Records. The label, headquartered in Hillsborough, NC, continues to celebrate its 20th anniversary. We're commemorating by highlighting some of their artists.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

The Green Party has become North Carolina's fourth official political party thanks to a new law offering more options to qualify, giving more candidate choices to some voters this fall.

A barbed wire fence stock image
Pxhere / Public Domain

Staffing and safety issues inside North Carolina prisons are at a perilous point. In 2017, five corrections officers were killed in violent incidents at Bertie and Pasquotank Correctional Institutions. And according to new reports, the deaths are a symptom of a bigger problem.

a Remington model 870 shotgun
Keith Srakocic, File / AP

Remington, the storied gun maker that began turning out flintlock rifles when there were only 19 states in the Union, has filed for bankruptcy reorganization amid years of slumping sales and legal and financial pressure over the Sandy Hook school massacre.

In papers filed Sunday in federal bankruptcy court in Delaware, Remington outlined a plan to turn over control to its creditors and continue operating with up to $100 million from lenders. It remains unclear what will happen to its 3,500 or so employees as it tries to put its finances in order.

Instructor Jill Caudill, right, demonstrates tig plate welding during a class at Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown on Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

The sounds of high-pitched drills fill the welding department of Guilford Technical Community College on a recent morning. Sparks fly and sweat drips from the faces of students as they work to fuse metal pieces together for a class project.

Vidant Health has a new app that allows North Carolinians to see a doctor whenever they want. The Vidant Now app allows a user to connect instantly with a physician for about $50 per consultation.

Farmworkers, Unions, Student Action with Farmworkers, UNCTV
SAF and UNCTV

A documentary about the little-known woman who co-founded the first farmworkers unions is being shown tonight in Raleigh. Many people have heard of Cesar Chavez. But right next to him was Dolores Huerta, fighting for racial and labor justice. Here is activist Angela Davis from the documentary called “Dolores.”

photo of Levelle Moton and a referee in action
Courtesy of LeVelle Moton

College basketball is part of North Carolina’s lifeblood, and team allegiances are not taken lightly. Yet the head coach of North Carolina Central University’s men’s basketball team is deeply respected by both those who wear the Eagles jersey and those who compete against it.

A protest sign against the Atlantic Coast Pipeline on Francine Stephenson's property in Johnston County.
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Crews are already cutting trees in Northampton and Robeson counties to make way for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, the 600-mile-long delivery system that will carry natural gas from West Virginia, across Virginia, and through North Carolina. The pipeline will cut an eight-county, 200-mile-long path across the Tar Heel State with supporters and opponents all along the route.

Thousands of people march down Fayetteville Street in downtown Raleigh on Saturday, March 24, 2018 in support of gun control.
Alex Kolyer / For WUNC

High school students and allies seeking stronger gun control laws in North Carolina following last month's Florida school shooting are walking through downtown Raleigh in solidarity with a similar weekend rally in Washington.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

For the first time since 2016, North Carolina has a state board of elections. The nine-member panel was seated on Wednesday.

Also this week, questions emerged about money that the 2014 Thom Tillis U.S. Senate campaign spent on Cambridge Analytica. And, a proposals for new gun regulations was rolled out by Democrats, who called the issue non-partisan.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, discuss some of this week's stories with WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii.

 

FT. BRAGG STORIES: 'The Fireball Went Over'

Mar 23, 2018
Portrait of Richard Clapp
Courtesy Richard Clapp

"I was only in the military six months when the disaster happened," recalled Richard Clapp. He was 19 years old on March 23, 1994, fresh out of basic training and jump school. He'd been at Fort Bragg just three weeks. That afternoon he stood on Green Ramp waiting to make his first official jump with the 82nd Airborne.

photo of brian hogan on the front steps of his home
Kathy Kmonicek / AP Photo

According to a report by The Associated Press, the Cherokee Department of Social Services has been systematically and illegally removing children from their homes for years. The actions may have started more than a decade ago and affect at least 100 families.

photo of the 1963 loyola basketball team with coaches. some of the team are white and some are african american.
Loyola University Archives / http://www.lib.luc.edu/specialcollections/items/show/225

When Mark Mehler and Charles Paikert first met to watch their favorite college basketball teams duke it out, they had no idea it would become a tradition. But year after year the two continued to meet at the same local bar, often times cheering for opposing teams. Journalism was their trade, but college hoops was their passion.

photo of elayna jean playing guitar and signing at a microphone
John Guerin

Many of the songs Cosmic Punk performs are rooted in angsty, teenage feelings. Elayna Jean, the band’s guitarist and vocalist, says that is because she wrote a lot of those songs while she was still in high school.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

Bob Orr is a former justice on the North Carolina Supreme Court. These days, he is an advocate for college athletes, remains passionate about constitutional law, and has been reading about Reconstruction-era history.

Orr, a one-time gubernatorial candidate, discusses those topics, as well as firearms and the likelihood of a 'blue wave' on the latest edition of the WUNCPolitics Podcast.

Prescription pills
Wikpedia

The North Carolina Department of Insurance is encouraging everyone to do some spring cleaning in their medicine cabinets. Operation Medicine Drop is looking for unused pills, especially pain killers, to be delivered to secure collection sites.

JULIENNE ALEXANDER / CRIMINAL

In the early 1970s, a horrific crime shook the city of Casper, Wyoming. People there still talk about the brutal attack of Amy Burridge, 11, and her half-sister, Becky Thompson, 18. What happened to two sisters on an isolated bridge on a cold September night is the subject of this week's episode of the Criminal podcast.

Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis shake hands after the debate at UNC-TV Wednesday night.
Mike Oniffrey / UNC-TV

Facebook’s stock plummeted at the news that 50 million user accounts had been breached and used to create profiles of prospective voters. Since then the company behind the breach, Cambridge Analytica, has been suspended from Facebook. The damage in North Carolina has already been done.

photo of a group of people posing for a picture
Courtesy of SNCC Digital Gateway.

Duke University has teamed up with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Legacy Project to connect today’s young organizers with activists of the civil rights era. The project is called “SNCC Digital Gateway,” and its aim is to pass on informational wealth from the organizers of SNCC to the young people of today, to help inform their activism. Instead of solely taking information from the SNCC activists, researchers treated the activists as partners and fellow scholars in their collaboration on this project.

photo of a man holding a card that says 'asheville is climate city'
Courtesy of The Collider

This month Asheville hosted the first ClimateCon, a conference to explore innovations and business solutions to combat the effects of climate change. The nine-day conference included a business of climate forum, a summit for emerging climate leaders, and community-wide events.

downtown Raleigh skyline
NCDOTcommunications / Flickr, Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/bbmA6K

Four North Carolina metropolitan areas ranked in the top 35 fastest-growing large areas in the country in 2017.

Together, these areas – Raleigh, Wilmington, Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, and Burlington – added nearly 90,000 people in just one year. Raleigh and Charlotte saw the vast majority of that growth with 80,000 new residents, but Wilmington and Burlington cracked the top 35 because of their year-over-year percentage population growth.

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