News

North Carolina Public Radio has launched a new radio station. WUNC Music can now be found online and on your phone at wuncmusic.org and on HD2 in the Triangle area.  

Morning Edition Host Eric Hodge spoke with WUNC Program Director David Brower about the new station.

ECU Scientists Track Spread Of Zombie Crabs

Aug 4, 2016
Cliff Hollis, ECU News Services

North Carolina's mud crabs are falling victim to an invasive parasite that researchers say turns them into walking zombies.

April Blakeslee is an assistant professor of biology at East Carolina University. She said the parasitic barnacle called Loxothylacus panopaei, or simply Loxo, can commandeer the reproductive systems of the crabs and alter their behavior.

Tim Kaine in Greensboro, N.C.
Chuck Burton / ASSOCIATED PRESS

At a rally in Greensboro Wednesday afternoon, Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine said voters cannot trust Donald Trump, criticized House Bill 2 and stressed the importance of this swing state in November.

Image of bottled water provided by Duke Energy to families affected by the coal ash spill.
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

State toxicologist Ken Rudo testified that Governor Pat McCrory participated via phone in a meeting to draft letters to well owners downplaying the risk of coal ash contamination in their drinking water.

Photo of Mike Pence and Pat McCrory
Evan Vucci / AP

With a little more than three months until the 2016 elections, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is facing strong backlash—even from some fellow Republicans—​against his latest verbal onslaught, in which he attacked the parents of a fallen soldier.

The controversy comes as Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton opens a sizable post-convention lead in most polls. Will this latest controversy affect Trump's chances in North Carolina? And what effect could it have on Gov. Pat McCrory, who has campaigned with Trump in the state?

More than two decades ago Father Greg Boyle (middle) founded 'Homeboy Industries,' the largest gang-internvention program in the country. Here he is on Thanksgiving day in 2012 at Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles.
Homeboy Industries

Note: This segment originally aired February 2, 2016.

In 1986, Jesuit priest Father Greg Boyle was appointed to a poor parish in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.

Abandoned farmhouse western North Carolina
Julia Franks

Eight years ago, Julia Franks and her husband bought a farm in western North Carolina. At the time, the 1800s farmhouse on the land was still standing and when they walked in the doors, they were greeted by dozens of odd artifacts, including animal bones, locks of hair, insect hives, and even a jar with a fingernail in it. Franks is a high school literature teacher and lover of writing, so it was hard for her to not let her imagination run wild.

The old well at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.
Tim Schleicher / flickr, Creative Commons

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has filed its latest response to the NCAA in an ongoing case over academic fraud involving athletes.

Durham Police Department

Nearly 150 communities across North Carolina will take part in the 33rd annual National Night Out.

The annual celebration aims to build relationships between police and citizens through an evening of entertainment and conversation. Organizers estimate more than 37 million people will participate nationwide.

A map of an arrow pointing from Raleigh, NC to Pharr, TX.
Climate Central / Climate Central

Duke Energy Carolinas customers used a summertime record amount of energy last week. The only time the company saw a higher use was during the polar vortex in February 2015.

The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

North Carolina’s so-called bathroom bill, House Bill 2, was challenged in court Monday. U.S. district judge Thomas Schroeder heard arguments on a temporary injunction motion. He did not make a ruling on the measure.

And on Friday, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down North Carolina’s controversial voter identification law on grounds of racial discrimination.

Don Yelton
Daily Show

In its decision to overturn North Carolina's voter identification law last week, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals cited numerous legal precedents and hundreds of pages of testimony.

In addition, the decision also cited a comedy show.

Photo of P.T. Deutermann
Cynthia Brann

For more than 20 years, P.T. Deutermann has channeled his experiences in the military into fiction writing. He has written 19 novels that have been inspired by his time as a Navy captain and an arms-control specialist in the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Photo of Mamie Neugent
David Spear

​In the late 1980s and early 90s, North Carolina photographer David Spear spent several years documenting the lives of his neighbors, the Neugents.

The family owned a tobacco farm in Rockingham County, and his photos depicted their attempts to keep their tobacco farm alive at a time when many others were dying. He described the Neugents as "fabulous people" who "raise hell, and they don't try to hide it."

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

Officials with the North Carolina State Board of Elections are scrambling to undo three years of work on the state's voter identification law ahead of the November election.

Prominent Coastal Geologist Quits Science Advisory Panel

Aug 1, 2016
Stan Riggs
Courtesy of East Carolina University

A prominent member of a science advisory panel of the Coastal Resources Commission has resigned.

Stan Riggs says he's no longer willing to fight what he calls an "uphill battle" against state leaders who are making poor long-term decisions about the coast.

iPhone screen with Pokemon GO on it.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Pokémon Go players in Rocky Mount may soon see their game-playing reality altered. City officials have asked the game's developer to remove more than 100 public sites from the game.

Talking With Taj Mahal: American Songster Radio Podcast Episode 3

Aug 1, 2016

In episode 3 of the podcast series American Songster Radio, host Dom Flemons calls on blues legend Taj Mahal for a conversation about their mutual love of the banjo and its complicated history. 

"All the pictures and caricatures of those black-faced minstrels really seemed to be degrading. But the instrument itself - there was something about it. It would rattle in my bones," Taj Mahal says of his early connections with instrument. 

A picture of an 'I Voted' sticker.
Vox Efx / Flickr

A federal appeals court has found that North Carolina's voter identification law was enacted "with discriminatory intent" and must be blocked.

An opinion issued Friday by a three-judge panel of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond reverses a lower-court's ruling that had upheld the law.

After Months Of Study, NC Zoo Elephants Form A Herd

Jul 29, 2016
NC Zoo

Five of the African elephants at the North Carolina Zoo have formed a herd, according to zoo officials.

This comes after staffers spent months studying the behavior of each elephant and observing how they interact with each other.

An image of an adult holding a child
Pexels / Creative Commons

 Note: This segment originally aired on Wednesday, April 27, 2016.

More than 179,000 children in North Carolina have had a parent incarcerated, according to a new report. As a result, these children are more likely to face emotional trauma and financial instability.

The report recommends improving a child's relationship with the incarcerated parent and the community as a way to lessen these burdens.

Ellis Dyson and the Shambles

  Note: This segment originally aired on Friday, February 19, 2016.

For Ellis Dyson, there is something alluring about the music from the 1920s. He sees it as dirty, raw and mysterious.

With the help of fellow musicians at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dyson has blended the sounds of Dixieland jazz with themes of standard folk ballads to create a "whiskey folk" ensemble.

Host Frank Stasio talks with Dyson about the band's origins and influences as a young group channeling another era.

Colette Heiser

CJ Suitt is a young black poet living in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. And he has a simple and frightening question, "Would I be shot if I called the police?"

CJ uses his poetry to combat stereotypes and to build bridges of understanding. But he admits, in the wake of yet another series of high profile killings of black men by the police, something has changed. CJ no longer feels safe walking at night.

Coat-tail riding has begun, as candidates for statewide races fully embrace Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, and a social media gaffe highlights the growing role of non-traditional campaigning.

UK International Trade Secretary Liam Fox
flickr.com/photos/number10gov/27817229713

LGBT advocates are criticizing the United Kingdom's decision to open a new trade office in the Triangle.

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