News

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Lawmakers have retreated to their home districts following a frenetic short session.

Becki Gray, of the John Locke Foundation, and Rob Schofield, with NC Policy Watch, join WUNC Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and discuss the budget, proposed constitutional amendments, as well as what legislators did not address.

Editor's Note: This Week In NC Politics will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

This year's session at the General Assembly felt, at times, like a blur.

WRAL Capitol Bureau Chief Laura Leslie joins the podcast to discuss the pace of the Legislature, some of the most significant measures, and how policy may influence the already underway election season.

Leslie, who worked at WUNC from 2004 until 2011, also weighs in on the departure of a key legislative staffer and shares what she misses most about public radio.

Editor's Note: The WUNCPolitics Podcast will take a break for the rest of July and will be back in early August.

Eat Your Feelings: How Hunger Becomes ‘Hanger’

Jul 6, 2018
Petras Gagilas/Flickr Creative Commons

Plenty of people blame feeling angry on being hungry and this year the Oxford English Dictionary added the word “hangry” as a colloquial blend of the two. The term reflects a common experience, but one that had not been well understood.

Jean Leon Gerome / Public Domain

Blackbeard’s stolen vessel, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, ran aground off the North Carolina coastline three hundred years ago this summer.

a picture of someone signing a picture of the band
courtesy of Gracie Curran

Gracie Curran grew up in the church. Her mom was the church choir director and most of the music in their house was gospel. While her friends enjoyed pop sensations like Britney Spears, Curran says she never really connected to popular music until she heard Etta James. James’s voice and lyrics spoke to her.

A picture of the band Wye Oak.
Shervin Lainez / Merge Records

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time, Eric Hodge chats with Wye Oak's Jenn Wasner about the title track from their latest record, 'The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs.'

She says the song has different meanings for different people, and that duality fueled her creative process.

Listen to the episode here:

wild horses along Outer Banks
Thomas Wheeler / AltAdjust.com

The Corolla Wild Horse Fund is urging tourists not to feed the 100 or so horses wandering near the beaches of Currituck County.

A drawing of a naked person running.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Streaking is a stunt that has stood the test of time. People have been streaking at least since the 1700's, some saying it started with Quakers running through the streets to show the "naked truth of the Gospel." These days, it's sporting events where we are most likely to see someone naked running across the field.  In the latest episode of the Criminal Podcast, host Phoebe Judge takes a look at the legal history of streaking.  

The Criminal podcast is recorded at WUNC.

Public transit systems, including GoTriangle, will see a funding cut from the state.
Courtesy of GoTriangle

Public transportation systems around the state will see funding cuts largely due to lower motor fuels tax revenue.

Rowan-Salisbury Schools

North Carolina has a new law to give a school district more flexibility if it has a lot of struggling schools - and the law applies only to Rowan-Salisbury Schools.

Robot from French technology summit
École polytechnique - J.Barande / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/UBfMcH

Despite the enduring narrative in pop culture of an impending apocalyptic robot-takeover, humans decided a while back to keep moving forward with plans to imbue intelligence into machines. 

Good Bowls

Many people are familiar with TOMS shoe company, which donates a pair of shoes for every one purchased. Now, a researcher in the Triangle is trying a similar business model with frozen meals.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have returned home following a hectic, six-week session during which they approved a state spending plan, continued an ongoing clash with the Governor, and for the most part, avoided any major controversy.

A reenactment at the Alamance Battleground on May 17, 2008.
Anthony Crider / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alamance_Battleground.jpg#filelinks

Supporters of the Alamance Battleground State Historic Site are in a race against time to buy the adjacent, privately-owned land before someone else does.

abstract art of a world map
Art by Nicholas Raymond / http://freestock.ca/flags_maps_g80-world_map__abstract_acrylic_p2970.html

In the middle of a landmass in the Northern Hemisphere bordered by oceans, people call themselves Americans. According to both their own laws and broader international ones, they are members of a group known as a nation-state – in this case the United States of America.

Anton Moussaev, center, stands with family and friends after his naturalization ceremony in 2017.
Courtey of Anton Moussaev

It's Anton Moussaev's birthday. Well, he was born in the Soviet Union in March 37 years ago, but he officially became an American on July 4, 2017 at a naturalization ceremony at Old Salem. So, he said that's his "second birthday."

By Haas, David, creator [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The federal government said it will finally pay a debt it has owed the state since Franklin D. Roosevelt was president.

The nonprofit breast cancer organization will now only have North Carolina offices in Charlotte and the Triangle.

National Fire Prevention Association

Independence Day celebrations raise concerns about fireworks-related injuries. Nationwide, emergency rooms treated almost 13,000 such injuries last year, according to the non-profit National Fire Protection Association.

photo of a scarred football helmet
HOUSE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE DEMOCRATS / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Football has remained one of America’s favorite forms of entertainment for years. Even as its ratings fall, the National Football League is estimated to have made $14 billion in 2017 alone. But science is finally catching up to the sport, and it suggests the big hits that delight fans do not come without a price. 

State Board of Education Chairman Bill Cobey (center-right) listens while State Superintendent Mark Johnson gives his monthly address to the board.
Jess Clark / WUNC

Tension between State Superintendent Mark Johnson and the State Board of Education has not improved since the Supreme Court handed down its ruling in a case between the two. If anything, the tension is rising.

A man walks out of the Art Institute at the American Tobacco Campus in downtown Durham on Monday, July 2, 2018.
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

The Art Institute campuses in Durham and Charlotte are expected to close sometime this year, according to a memo sent to employees Monday and obtained by the News & Observer. The decision, as well as the expected closing of South University in High Point, could affect approximately 3,000 students.

Cedar Fork Elementary in Wake County would have to add three more kindergarten classrooms under the class-size change scheduled to go into effect in the fall.
Jess Clark / WUNC

Aspiring teachers are more likely to mistake emotions for anger in the face of a black person than a white person, according to a new study published in the journal "Contemporary Education." It also found that participants were more likely to view the behavior of black boys as hostile.

David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library / Duke University Archives

Last August, Duke University removed a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the entrance to the Duke University Chapel. The removal came amidst country-wide protests over Confederate symbols, and soon after the violent clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia. Since then, Duke has embarked on a project to interrogate its history and identify some of the unsung heroes of the school.

Fred Nijhout poses with crossed arms in front of abstract
Megan Mendenhall / Duke Photography

Frederik Nijhout grew up in post-World War II Holland, and his childhood was full of stories from the war, including his father's imprisonment by the Germans and his daring escape with forged travel documents. As a child, he moved to Guatemala and later to Curaçao where he was captivated by the diverse and colorful nature.

When students think of summer, most think of sleeping in, no homework or going to the pool. But Guilford County Schools officials want students to add another thing to that list: reading. 

The United States is becoming more diverse.
Vintage 2017 Population Estimates / Census

By 2025, projections show North Carolina will have 23 counties in which non-Hispanic whites are not the majority race, sometimes referred to as a majority minority population.

FT. BRAGG STORIES: 'It's Like A Mad Rush'

Jul 1, 2018
Fireworks explode on the Fourth of July at Fort Bragg's Main Post Parade Field.
Pyro Shows

The Fourth of July is a big deal at Fort Bragg, where the annual concert and fireworks display regularly draw a crowd of 40,000.

Danny Sheckles is a pyrotechnician with Pyro Shows, a Tennessee-based company that produces firework displays at Fort Bragg and throughout the southeast.

Hiram Reynolds of Fayetteville, N.C. served in the U.S. military for 12 years. He joined other protesters in downtown Raleigh on Saturday, June 30, 2018 to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policies.
Rebecca Martinez / WUNC

Thousands of people gathered across North Carolina this weekend to protest the Trump administration's immigration policies. 

A hog farm in Lyons, Georgia.
Jeff Vanuga, USDA NRCS

A federal jury is punishing the world's largest pork producer with a $25 million verdict after jurors decided that two neighbors of a hog farm suffered unreasonable nuisances from flies, buzzards and rumbling trucks tied to an industrial-scale hog grower.

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