News

Pages

State of Things
8:00 am
Wed July 25, 2012

Tracking the Elderly

How do older adults maintain healthy, sustainable lives? How does the community they live in come into play? These questions reach into the spheres of urban planning, development policy, and public policy. Kendra Heatwole-Shank explored these ideas and more by keeping track of some seniors with the help of GPS technology.

Read more
State of Things
8:00 am
Wed July 25, 2012

Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness

www.alexandrafuller.org

Alexandra Fuller's first book, "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight" (Random House/2001) was an international bestseller. It chronicled her childhood in colonial Africa as her family moved from impoverished farm to impoverished farm, landing in Rhodesia in time for the country’s war of independence.

Read more
Politics & Government
6:55 am
Wed July 25, 2012

Perdue Signs Bill to Help Military Spouses

Governor Bev Perdue has signed a bill helping military spouses find an easier path to work.

Read more
Arts & Culture
6:10 am
Wed July 25, 2012

DPAC Ticket Sales #2 in the World

The Durham Performing Arts Center finished the first half of 2012 in grand style.   New numbers put DPAC ticket sales higher than New York’s Radio City Music Hall and the Nokia Theatre in LA. 

Leoneda Inge:  One of the shows that likely put DPAC over the top was you guess it “Wicked.”

Wicked:  I hope you’re happy! I hope you’re happy now!

Read more
Environment
6:00 am
Wed July 25, 2012

UNC Working to Save Native Species in Galapagos

Native species on the Galapagos Islands like sea lions and "Darwin's finches" are under threat from tourism and climate change. UNC researchers are working to find ways to save these species. The UNC Center for Galapagos Studies
The UNC Center for Galapagos Studies

The Galapagos is a chain of 13 large islands about six hundred miles from the coast of Ecuador. It was there, in 1835, that the British scientist Charles Darwin began thinking about how animals change over time. Since then, scientists have called the Galapagos a living laboratory,  a place to study evolution and natural selection. Now, with 180,000 tourists visiting each year, experts say the living lab is in danger, and University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill scientists are stepping up to help.

Read more
Politics & Government
9:16 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Transit Money Coming To NC

North Carolina will get about $14 million of the nearly $800 million the federal government is giving out to update transit systems across the country. The grants are part of the US Department of Transportation's "State of Good Repair and Bus Livability" effort.

DOT Secretary Ray Lahood says the grants will have a transformative effect.

Read more
Military
9:02 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Bragg Hazing Trial Begins Today

A sergeant accused of hazing a private who then committed suicide goes on trial today at Fort Bragg. Sergeant Adam Holcomb of Youngstown, Ohio, is one of eight soldiers charged in the death of 19-year-old Private Danny Chen, of New York. Military officials say Chen shot himself last year in Afghanistan after weeks of physical and emotional abuse. He was allegedly targeted because he was Chinese-American.

Read more
State of Things
8:00 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Intimate Wars

www.intimatewars.com

An experience early in Merle Hoffman’s career as a counselor solidified her life’s mission.  She was asked to speak to and comfort a woman who was struggling with the decision to have an abortion. Holding that woman’s hand on that difficult day started Hoffman on the path of advocating for the reproductive rights of women everywhere.

Read more
State of Things
8:00 am
Tue July 24, 2012

Stand Up That Mountain

Jay Leutze was a non-practicing lawyer writing a novel, working for the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and minding his own business in his home in western North Carolina when he got a phone call from an impassioned and outraged 14 year old named Ashley. She and her aunt and uncle, Ollie and Curly, were sure that the new scar on a nearby mountain was a violation of the state's Ridge Act.

Read more
State of Things
8:00 am
Tue July 24, 2012

So Rich, So Poor

More than 20 million people in the United States are living in extreme poverty at this moment.

That means that the income for a family of 4 is half below the poverty line, or $11,000. Six million people’s incomes consist only of food stamps. These are shocking numbers, and Peter Edelman says most people are not familiar with the bleak reality of why extreme poverty exists. Edelman is the author of “So Rich, So Poor: Why it’s so Hard to End Poverty in America”

Read more

Pages