Slavery http://wunc.org en How Black Authors Write About U.S. Law And Race http://wunc.org/post/how-black-authors-write-about-us-law-and-race <p></p><p>From enslavement to the one-drop rule to the three-fifths compromise, United States law has defined African-American identity. Duke University professor<a href="http://law.duke.edu/fac/holloway/"> Karla Holloway </a>is exploring&nbsp;how black fiction connect racial identity and the creation of law for African Americans.&nbsp;</p><p> Thu, 23 Jan 2014 17:05:30 +0000 Nicole Campbell & Frank Stasio 29374 at http://wunc.org How Black Authors Write About U.S. Law And Race Buncombe County Puts Slave Records Online http://wunc.org/post/buncombe-county-puts-slave-records-online <p></p><p>During the Great Depression, the New Deal funded a project to collect the narratives of former slaves.&nbsp; Sarah Gudger came forward to give an account of her life as a slave in Buncombe County.&nbsp; Her testimony was the same brutal story that is familiar to many of us.&nbsp; She described a “hard life” of nothing but “work, work, work,” under the threat of abuse.&nbsp; Wed, 17 Apr 2013 16:13:13 +0000 Shawn Wen & Isaac-Davy Aronson 13835 at http://wunc.org Buncombe County Puts Slave Records Online Help Me to Find My People http://wunc.org/post/help-me-find-my-people <p>African-American kinship often starts with slavery, an institution built on human trafficking – the buying and selling of people as if they were commodities.&nbsp; The tearing apart of family was part of the violence of slavery and the constant threat of separation from your family was another kind of violence all its own. Historian Heather Williams studies the effects and after effects of slavery.</p><p></p><p> Wed, 01 Aug 2012 15:51:00 +0000 Frank Stasio & Susan Davis 4177 at http://wunc.org Help Me to Find My People