The State of Things

State of Things
10:37 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Enlightened Choices

Kim Wade-Benzoni (www.fuqua.duke.edu/)

As adults, we are expected to behave maturely, but scientists find that often the reverse is true. People prefer their own gain over that of others and prefer instant gratification instead of delayed reward. However, a new study shows that with the right prompting, people can be led to forgo their selfish desires in favor of leaving an altruistic legacy.

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State of Things
10:23 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Los Restos de la Revolución

Kevin Kunishi's

In 1979, a socialist movement in Nicaragua led by a group called the Sandinistas overthrew dictator Anastasio Somoza. They set about creating a socialist government for Nicaragua, but during the Cold War era, the U.S. intervened and the CIA supplied and trained a counter-insurgency called the Contras. What proceeded was a decade-long civil war.

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State of Things
10:15 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Silent Spring Turns 50

Rachel Carson's

Fifty years ago, the book "Silent Spring" launched the environmental movement and changed the way we think about man-made chemicals. Its impact has been long lasting and the writing of author Rachel Carson still influences people to this day. Host Frank Stasio talks about Carson and the legacy of "Silent Spring" with Linda Lear, biographer, historian and author of "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature" (Holt/1998).

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State of Things
11:34 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Storytelling Festival

Donald Davis, professional storyteller

In the age of digital technology, storytelling is alive and well. In fact, many professional storytellers travel, working the festival circuit. Donald Davis is on the road 42 weekends this year, entertaining audiences with tales about identity, spirituality and everyday life.

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State of Things
10:59 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Wage Theft

Kim Bobo's

Wage theft has been called "America's silent crime wave." It’s when businesses steal from their employees through a variety of unconscionable methods. Twenty-six percent of low wage workers don't get paid the minimum wage they are entitled to by law. Seventy-six percent of the country's work force doesn't get paid for the over time they work.

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State of Things
11:50 am
Tue September 25, 2012

National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims

More than 85 people were murdered in the Triangle and Triad regions of North Carolina last year.  You may have heard about the crimes in the news, but you probably don’t know much more than that. The National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children aims to raise awareness about these losses of life.

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State of Things
11:22 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Ryan Adams: Losering, A Story of Whiskeytown

Book cover,

There’s a lot of nostalgia for the 1990s these days. The economy was on the upswing. The music industry, the publishing industry, and the newspaper industry were all in better shape than they are now. And for a time there, it looked like the Triangle region of North Carolina might be the next big thing in popular music.

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State of Things
11:57 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Meet Laura Mersini-Houghton

www.physics.unc.edu

The origins of the universe are being uncovered in Chapel Hill, NC thanks to Laura Mersini-Houghton, a cosmologist and theoretical physicist at the University of North Carolina. Her work delves even deeper into how our world came to be than the Big Bang theory.

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State of Things
11:35 am
Fri September 21, 2012

A Wilderness of Error

www.wildernessoferror.com

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Errol Morris has turned his lens on flaws in America’s justice system before. His 1988 documentary “The Thin Blue Line” was pivotal in getting a wrongly convicted Texas man out of prison. Now, Morris is the author of a new book called “A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald”

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State of Things
11:29 am
Fri September 21, 2012

Carolina Chocolate Drops

www.carolinachocolatedrops.com

The Carolina Chocolate Drops famously reclaimed traditional mountain music for African-Americans. Their efforts were celebrated from Nashville to Hollywood and by the folks who give out the Grammy Awards. That legacy took on some poignancy this past year when their mentor, master fiddler Joe Thompson, passed away.

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