Science & Technology

Science & Technology
4:52 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Google Names Cary The Leading NC City For Online Business

Google named Cary the state's 2013 eCity for the strength of its online small business community.
Credit Google

Google has announced its first eCity awards, recognizing one city in every state for the strength of its online business community. In North Carolina, Google gave that distinction to Cary for the high percentage of small businesses that leverage the Internet to connect with customers. Being an eCity won’t earn Cary cash prizes or awards, but it does earn the mayor a congratulatory phone call from Google and some hefty bragging rights.

Read more
Science & Technology
2:00 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Is The Carolina Dog Native To North America? New Science Says: Maybe

Pittsboro resident Marielle Hare owns a dog, Oona, that she believes might have traces of Carolina Dog in her. She is interested in testing its DNA.
Credit Marielle Hare

The first Carolina dog that I. Lehr Brisbin took home with him smeared fecal matter all over the back seat of his car. He found her at a pound in Augusta, Georgia in the 1970s, and despite strong discouragement from the pound’s staff (they said she bit everyone who touched her), he managed to wrangle her into a carry crate in his back seat, where “she immediately had a diarrhea attack,” Brisbin recalls. But he was far from discouraged.  Brisbin wanted to take her home because he thought there was something strange and special about her. She resembled some wild dogs he’d seen in the woods along the Savannah River. And Brisbin was starting to put together an exciting hypothesis about why there were wild dogs in the South Carolina lowland that looked and acted different from most others.

At the time, I. Lehr Brisbin was a biologist studying wildlife at the Savannah River Ecology Lab, a field research station of the University of Georgia in Aiken, South Carolina. His research often took him into the 300 square mile wilderness of the Savannah River Ecology site. That’s where he first noticed the wild dogs.  They had long, pointy snouts, ears that permanently stood up and tails that curled back on themselves.  And their behavior, he noticed, was unusual, too. They dug small pits in the ground with their snouts. They hunted in packs and signaled to each other by flashing the white undersides of their tails. They moved as a pack, like wolves.  They were more like Australian Dingoes than European-bred dogs brought to America by colonists.  Brisbin hypothesized that the wild South Carolina dogs descended from canines that belonged to Native Americans, that the dogs’ ancestors had crossed the land bridge between Asia and North America with humans around 12,000 years ago.

Read more
Science & Technology
5:32 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Study Finds US Nuclear Reactors Susceptible To Terrorist Attacks

The Brunswick Nuclear Plant was ranked one of the most vulnerable nuclear reactors to a terrorist attack.
Credit Doc Searls via Wikimedia

A new study commissioned by the Defense Department says every nuclear reactor in America is ill-prepared for a terrorist attack. North Carolina's Brunswick Nuclear Plant was ranked among the most vulnerable to attack, because of it's proximity to the Atlantic Ocean.

Kim Crawford is a spokesperson for Duke Energy, which manages four nuclear sites in North Carolina, including Brunswick. She says their plants are safe.

Read more
Science & Technology
4:38 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

N.C. Scientist Helps Discover New Carnivore In The Andes

The olinguito is the first new species of carnivore discovered in the western hemisphere in 35 years.
Credit NC Museum of Natural Sciences

A North Carolina scientist is part of a team that's made a big find: the first carnivore to be discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.  

The new animal is called the olinguito (pronounced oh-lin-GHEE-toe). But for the longest time, olinguitos were thought to be olingos, small raccoon-like carnivores that live in the Andes Mountains.

Read more
Science & Technology
1:57 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

N.C. State And NSA To Open Data Research Lab In Raleigh

The NSA is creating a partnership with N.C. State.
Credit nsa.gov

N.C. State is partnering with the National Security Agency to launch a data-collecting research lab. 

The school announced this morning it won a $60 million contract to create the facility on the university's Centennial Campus.  Terri Lomax is vice chancellor for research, innovation and economic development at N.C. State.  She says the lab is meant to answer questions about how to better collect, sort and store massive amounts of computer data.

Read more
Science & Technology
2:00 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Cree Unveils $99 LED Street Light For Neighborhoods

Cree's XSPR street light.
Credit Cree

Durham-based lighting company Cree recently unveiled its latest LED creation: a low-cost, energy-saving residential street light they claim can save cities millions on their electric bills. While LED street lights have been around for years, most are created specifically for roads and interstates, not neighborhoods. Cree’s new light—the XSPR street light— is designed with residential areas in mind, and it also wears a lower price tag.

Read more
The State of Things
11:36 am
Mon August 12, 2013

The Mysterious Relationship Between Brain And Body

A picture of the human brain
Credit creative commons / creative commons

Scientist Staci Bilbo helps decipher the mind body relationship

Scientists generally understand that healthy bodies and healthy minds are related, but the interaction between the two isn’t as clear.

Read more
Science & Technology
6:56 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Expanding The NC Broadband Highway

Credit www.planetofsuccess.com/blog/

A North Carolina public broadband network is touting a grant it's using to expand its bandwidth and reach into rural communities. 

The group MCNC is celebrating the $144 million grant from the Golden Leaf Foundation Monday.  Gov. Pat McCrory is expected to attend the event. 

Read more
The State of Things
12:00 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Flight Of The Oystercatcher

Two Oystercatchers on Oregon Inlet, NC
Credit Jeff Lewis / http://www.flickr.com/photos/natureimages/

  

The oystercatcher is the clown of the bird world. It has pink legs, a long orange bill and bright yellow eyes. And the eastern population of the oystercatcher is in danger. There are only about 11,000 in existence, and scientists are doing everything they can to make sure they stick around. Lindsay Addison is a coastal biologist for Audobon, North Carolina. She’s involved in a project to track the migratory patterns of these beach birds. Host Frank Stasio talks to her about the project.

Read more
The State of Things
11:54 am
Wed July 31, 2013

What Makes Teens Do What They Do?

“What are they Thinking: The Straight facts about the risk taking, social networking, still developing teen brain” by Aaron M. White and Scott Swartzwelder
Credit W.W. Norton & Company, Inc

Scientist Aaron White discuses a new book he co-authored, 'What are they Thinking: The Straight facts about the risk taking, social networking, still developing teen brain'

    

While the verdict has long been out that adolescents are irrational and impulsive, recent research has shown that hormones are not the primary culprit for this behavior; the brain is also at fault.

Read more

Pages