Science & Technology

Science news

How Games Move Us

Sep 16, 2016

How to Make a Golden Record

Sep 16, 2016
North Carolina researchers uncovered this statue of Aphrodite while digging in the ancient city of Petra in Jordan.
Tom Parker / NC State University

Teams from North Carolina State University and East Carolina University were on a dig in the ancient city of Petra in Jordan this summer, looking for ceramics, coins, bones and other evidence of how the Nabatean people lived their lives there in the first four centuries A.D. 

N.C. State history professor Tom Parker said during an excavation of a second-century villa, the trench supervisor noticed what looked like two "butts" beginning to emerge from the sand.

Ask The Ethicist

Sep 14, 2016
Ethics
Wikimedia / Wikimedia

What should you do if you know a friend is cheating on their spouse? Should you tell a friend who applied to your firm the real, but confidential, reason she did not get hired? 

Finding solutions to the ethical dilemmas of everyday life are the work of New York Times ethicist, Kwame Anthony Appiah. Appiah is a professor of philosophy and law at NYU. 

If other animals can regenerate their limbs, why can’t humans?

Sep 12, 2016
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Pogrebnoj-Alexandroff/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en">CC-BY-SA 3.0</a>. Image cropped.

Have you ever watched a fish swim and thought that all of the long, tiny bones in its pectoral fin looked a bit — just a little bit — like fingers? Or seen a salamander that’s regrown its tail after a close call with a predator, and wondered why we can’t regenerate our limbs? As scientists learn more about the genes that shape animal musculoskeletal systems, they’re uncovering clues about how our own limbs developed — and may someday regenerate.

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Wikimedia Commons

More than 300 million tourists visited US national parks in 2015, a 5 percent increase from the previous year. The National Park Service celebrated its 100th birthday last month, and recently President Barack Obama added to the list of protected parks and monuments.

But with increased popularity comes controversy and management problems.

At the Grand Canyon, for example, more visitors has resulted in more interest in development around the park — and more difficulty balancing preservation and tourism.

How much math should kids learn in school?

Sep 10, 2016
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Pixapopz. Image cropped.

Did you use a polynomial equation today? When was the last time you calculated the volume of a sphere?

While human achievements in mathematics continue to reach new levels of complexity, many of us who aren’t mathematicians at heart (or engineers by trade) may struggle to remember the last time we used calculus.

It’s a fact not lost on American educators, who amid rising math failure rates are debating how math can better meet the real-life needs of students. Should we change the way math is taught in schools, or eliminate some courses entirely?

US officials are rushing to develop a Zika vaccine by 2017

Sep 10, 2016
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Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC. Image cropped.

The Rio Olympics have come and gone, but the spread of Zika virus internationally remains a threat for the United States. The CDC is actively monitoring two clusters of the virus in Florida. Government officials expect that Zika will eventually spread. Meanwhile, vaccine candidates are being rushed through clinical trials, but won't be available at least until the spring of 2017. 

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says that for now, it’s important to contain Zika and to raise public awareness about its effects.

How realistic are the hacks in 'Mr. Robot'?

Sep 10, 2016
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Courtesy Universal Cable Productions.

Fans of the show "Mr. Robot" know that cybersecurity programmer Elliot Alderson is no character to mess with. As a member of the cyber-vigilante group "fsociety," Elliot is dedicated to bringing down E Corp, the company responsible for his father’s death, through technological sleights of hand. Elliot’s hacks have made use of Raspberry Pi computers, DeepSounds discs, and DDoS attacks, and recently even targeted the FBI.

John McCord, UNC Coastal Studies Institute - Battle of the Atlantic expedition.

Maritime archeologists are hoping to shed light on a little-known World War II battlefield off the North Carolina Coast.

In July of 1942, a German U-boat sank the freighter SS Bluefields in the waters near Cape Hatteras. The US Navy returned fire and sank the German sub with 45 crewmen on board.

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

It's been a common dilemma since the dawn of the industrial age, machines taking jobs away from people.

We call it automation. And while you likely won’t hear this spoken aloud amid all the semi-factual rhetoric of an election season, most experts say that many more jobs have been lost in the last 25 years to automation than to trade policy.

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Carlo Allegri/Reuters

The election season has now been going on for more than a year, and while the candidates make lots of speeches about taxes, job creation or international trade, there’s one topic you don't hear about much on the campaign trail: science.

It certainly didn't play a role in the primaries, but might there be more of a science focus in the general election? Maybe even some science questions during the three scheduled debates?

There's a new focus on giving Olympic architecture a second life

Aug 28, 2016
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André Motta/Brasil2016.gov.br&nbsp;

Reduce, reuse, and recycle aren’t the first words you think of upon seeing the shiny, just-finished stadiums that form the backdrop for each Olympic Games. But after the crowds have gone, every host city is left to face the problem of its vast, emptied Olympic complexes.

Do you need an 80,000-seat bird's nest? (Asking for Beijing.)

Decoding the Hacks of ‘Mr. Robot’

Aug 26, 2016

A Hand, a Fin, a Gene

Aug 26, 2016

Decoding the Hacks of ‘Mr. Robot’

Aug 26, 2016

A Hand, a Fin, a Gene

Aug 26, 2016

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