Science & Technology

Science news

Jupiter Surprises In Its Closeup

May 27, 2017

Can You Fidget Away Your Anxiety?

May 27, 2017

Why Are Whales Whale-Sized?

May 27, 2017
Scott Beale / Flickr/ Creative Commons

It is tough out there for biotech companies. The rewards can be big, but the time frames are long and the risks are high. Research Triangle Park-based G1 Therapeutics is the latest hope for the area’s biotech scene.

Getting Inside The Head Of A Muskox

May 20, 2017

Weighing A Stockpile Of Computer Threats

May 20, 2017

Your Airline Will See You Now

May 20, 2017
Courtesy CERN

In a cavern 100 meters below the surface of the earth, physicists are constructing the universe – theoretically at least. Physicist Kate Shaw is a researcher studying CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. She works specifically on the 7,000 ton ATLAS detector that is investigating fundamental particles. 

i
NASA

NASA’s spacesuit closet is looking a little bare these days, according to an audit released last month by the agency’s Office of Inspector General.

Sea Spray’s Tie To The Sky

May 13, 2017

The star-nosed mole may take the prize for the most extreme adaptation. Its eponymous nose, which looks like a fleshy pink starfish sticking out of its face, is the most sensitive organ of any mammal's on Earth.

k
<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/keyboard-ok-keys-leave-input-943748/">TBIT</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

For privacy wonks and internet companies alike, April was a bellwether month: President Donald Trump signed Senate Joint Resolution 34 into law, rolling back internet privacy rules issued last December by the Federal Communications Commission.

From oral history, a 14,000-year-old archaeological discovery

May 7, 2017
S
Keith Holmes/Hakai Institute

In their oral history, the Heiltsuk people describe how the area around Triquet Island, on the western coast of their territory in British Columbia, remained open land during the ice age.

“People flocked there for survival because everywhere else was being covered by ice, and all the ocean was freezing and all of the food resources were dwindling,” says Heiltsuk Nation member William Housty.

And late last year, archaeologists excavating an ancient Heiltsuk village on Triquet Island uncovered the physical evidence: a few flakes of charcoal from a long-ago hearth.

e
NASA/JPL-Caltech

New research from NASA’s Cassini mission has all eyes on Enceladus, Saturn’s sixth-largest moon. The research, recently published in Science magazine, indicates that plumes of vapor escaping from cracks in the moon’s icy shell are full of molecular hydrogen, the fuel for microbial life.

The House That Snot Built

May 6, 2017

Borne To Be Wild

May 6, 2017
S
Courtesy of Hydronalix

Last year, rescue workers began using a vessel called Emily to pull stranded refugees from rough waters near the Greek island of Lesbos. Part buoy and part life raft, Emily helped more than 240 asylum seekers to safety in its first 10 days of use.

Pages