Science & Technology

Science news

What would Styrofoam be like if it were made out of steel? Afsaneh Rabiei at North Carolina State University has been working for years to develop and perfect metal foams, the product of a manufacturing process that embeds hollow metal spheres in solid metal.

The resulting material is light, strong, heat, and radiation-resistant, and, when incorporated in a bulletproof vest, for example, capable of shattering bullets on impact without injuring the person wearing it.

A Candid Camera for Wildlife

May 7, 2016

Preparing for a Stellar Show

May 7, 2016

Recalculating the Global Influence of GPS

May 7, 2016

Shedding Pounds, Then Keeping Them Off

May 7, 2016

Shedding Pounds, Then Keeping Them Off

May 6, 2016

A Candid Camera for Wildlife

May 6, 2016

Laser-scanning our culture to preserve it

May 5, 2016
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Climate-induced apocalypse forthcoming or not, our Earth endures constant environmental stress. Our landscapes erode, our buildings and roads wear down and crumble. Sometimes humans exacerbate the stress; sometimes the structures simply surrender to time.

@camtraplive / Twitter

In 1913, National Geographic published the first photographs taken with an automatic camera trap.

Wildlife photographer George Shiras rigged a string to his camera shutter and used bait to coax animals into pulling it, arguably resulting in the first animal selfies ever.

Today, the technology has come a long way, and more scientists are using it to study the behavior and diversity of species all over the world, and it has opened a new frontier in citizen science.

NASA

Doug Wheelock has spent more than 178 days in space. He has been on six space walks, and describes the experience as trying to do a “ballet dance on fingertips,” where the slightest movement goes a long way.

In his almost two decades with NASA, he has spent six months as the Crew Support Astronaut for the International Space Station, served as liaison with Russia’s Cosmonaut Training Center, and trained both Russian and American astronauts for space trips. 

In this memoir, a science lab portrayed as 'homey' and respectful

May 2, 2016
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Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

Much of the language used to teach scientific principles or describe exciting scientific discoveries is anything but exciting. Scientific language, as a rule, is precise, but it can also be boring, elitist, and all but impenetrable to the average listener or reader.

Geobiologist Hope Jahren wants to change all that.  

Plugging Into DNA for Digital Data Storage

Apr 30, 2016

Mapping Out the Future of Genomics

Apr 30, 2016

How much do we really know about the Zika virus?

Apr 30, 2016

In April, the CDC announced that there’s finally enough evidence to draw a definitive connection between Zika virus and microcephaly, the condition where infants are born with unusually small heads and brain damage. But many questions remain, such as how the virus passes from mother to child.

Mapping Out the Future of Genomics

Apr 29, 2016

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