Science & Technology

Science news

US officials are rushing to develop a Zika vaccine by 2017

Sep 10, 2016
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Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC. Image cropped.

The Rio Olympics have come and gone, but the spread of Zika virus internationally remains a threat for the United States. The CDC is actively monitoring two clusters of the virus in Florida. Government officials expect that Zika will eventually spread. Meanwhile, vaccine candidates are being rushed through clinical trials, but won't be available at least until the spring of 2017. 

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says that for now, it’s important to contain Zika and to raise public awareness about its effects.

How realistic are the hacks in 'Mr. Robot'?

Sep 10, 2016
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Courtesy Universal Cable Productions.

Fans of the show "Mr. Robot" know that cybersecurity programmer Elliot Alderson is no character to mess with. As a member of the cyber-vigilante group "fsociety," Elliot is dedicated to bringing down E Corp, the company responsible for his father’s death, through technological sleights of hand. Elliot’s hacks have made use of Raspberry Pi computers, DeepSounds discs, and DDoS attacks, and recently even targeted the FBI.

John McCord, UNC Coastal Studies Institute - Battle of the Atlantic expedition.

Maritime archeologists are hoping to shed light on a little-known World War II battlefield off the North Carolina Coast.

In July of 1942, a German U-boat sank the freighter SS Bluefields in the waters near Cape Hatteras. The US Navy returned fire and sank the German sub with 45 crewmen on board.

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

It's been a common dilemma since the dawn of the industrial age, machines taking jobs away from people.

We call it automation. And while you likely won’t hear this spoken aloud amid all the semi-factual rhetoric of an election season, most experts say that many more jobs have been lost in the last 25 years to automation than to trade policy.

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Carlo Allegri/Reuters

The election season has now been going on for more than a year, and while the candidates make lots of speeches about taxes, job creation or international trade, there’s one topic you don't hear about much on the campaign trail: science.

It certainly didn't play a role in the primaries, but might there be more of a science focus in the general election? Maybe even some science questions during the three scheduled debates?

There's a new focus on giving Olympic architecture a second life

Aug 28, 2016
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André Motta/Brasil2016.gov.br 

Reduce, reuse, and recycle aren’t the first words you think of upon seeing the shiny, just-finished stadiums that form the backdrop for each Olympic Games. But after the crowds have gone, every host city is left to face the problem of its vast, emptied Olympic complexes.

Do you need an 80,000-seat bird's nest? (Asking for Beijing.)

Decoding the Hacks of ‘Mr. Robot’

Aug 26, 2016

A Hand, a Fin, a Gene

Aug 26, 2016

Decoding the Hacks of ‘Mr. Robot’

Aug 26, 2016

A Hand, a Fin, a Gene

Aug 26, 2016
"The Physics of Life" by Adrian Bejan
Adrian Bejan

What is life and its meaning?

That question has perplexed philosophers and other theoretical scientists for centuries.

They have sought both spiritual and intellectual guidance to come up with intricate conclusions for what it means to be alive.

But mechanical engineer Adrian Bejan says there is a much simpler conclusion: physics.

This is the controversial plan underway to save the endangered vaquita

Aug 22, 2016

The vaquita is one of the smallest, and rarest, cetacean species. The diminutive porpoise is native to the northern part of the Gulf of California. Scientists estimate that only 60 individuals remain in the wild. What’s driving down the population? Nets cast by poachers searching for an endangered fish — the totoaba. 

Recently, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said the government was considering classifying voting systems part of the nation’s “critical infrastructure,” a designation currently held by systems such as the electric grid and banking networks.

The announcement comes on the heels of reports of a vast infiltration of Democratic Party servers. 

The physics behind the world’s fastest swim strokes

Aug 21, 2016

To propel themselves through the water, swimmers use different strokes to control drag and lift. But which stroke is the fastest? Some experts have pinpointed the fish kick — a version of the dolphin kick — as the speediest swimming style.

Why? As swim coach and engineer Rick Madge explains, it's all about fluid dynamics.

The Race to Build a Smaller Rocket

Aug 19, 2016

NC State Awarded Grant For New Plant Sciences Initiative

Aug 19, 2016
Artist rendering of the new plant sciences building
NC State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

The Golden LEAF Foundation has awarded a $45 million grant to NC State to help the university build a new plant sciences building. Along with other contributions, the grant gets the university closer to the $160 million cost of construction.

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PuckerButt Pepper Company

The first time Ed Currie tasted the Carolina Reaper, a fire-engine red chili pepper the size of a golf ball, “it knocked me to my knees,” he says. “I was very surprised.”

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Tbachner/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Orang-utan_bukit_lawang_2006.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>

The human tendency to be right-handed is obvious — especially if you’re a lefty and have to deal with right-handed desks and scissors, not to mention spiral notebooks.

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