State Politics

Political news from around NC (and beyond).

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

This week in state politics, a look at the budget.

Jeff Tiberii talks with Becki Gray of the John Locke Foundation and Rob Schofield of the N.C. Justice Center on the $22.9 billion spending plan passed by the North Carolina Senate.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about the Senate budget with Loretta Boniti of Spectrum News.

The Senate passed a spending proposal, but not before some late-night wrangling and more than a few surprises.

The final spending bill wasn't passed until 3 a.m., well after many journalists thought.

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Updated at 12:53 p.m., June 21, 2017

North Carolina state senators are expected to give final approval to a $23 billion dollar state budget Wednesday afternoon.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

The White House is reeling after the president fired James Comey as FBI director earlier this week. The Trump administration said Comey tarnished the FBI’s reputation by mishandling its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails. However, many Democrats suspect a cover-up and are calling for a special prosecutor into the investigation of Trump’s campaign aides’ ties to Russia.

North Carolina state government gets most of its revenue from individual taxpayers
Gov. Roy Cooper's office

The Republican-led North Carolina Senate passed its budget proposal along party lines early Friday morning.

The $22.9 billion dollar plan would spend more than $500 million less than a plan offered by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper.

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The North Carolina Senate released their $22.9 billion spending plan earlier this week. The budget has significant implications for the state’s education system. It shifts how teacher raises are allocated and proposes a $600 million increase in education spending.

Photo: Senate Leader Phil Berger, a Republican from Rockingham County
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

State Senators rolled out a $22.9 billion spending plan Tuesday afternoon at the General Assembly. This spending proposal represents an increase of 2.5 percent over the current budget and is a significant step in the protracted budget process.

State Senator Phil Berger
Dave DeWitt

The new fiscal year begins July 1, and lawmakers could get a two-year budget plan in place by then if all goes as scheduled.

A picture of an empty wallet.
401(K) 2012 / Creative Commons

Some North Carolina state senators are trying to phase out traditional public employee pensions and government retiree health coverage to prevent the state's shortfall for those financial obligations from worsening.

Senate Republicans revived debate Wednesday over the future of employee retirement benefits by discussing their bill in committee.

Spring 2017 Elon University Poll
Elon University

A new political poll from Elon University found that more North Carolina voters support Governor Roy Cooper than not after his first 100 days in office.

Mark Binker
WRAL TV

Mark Binker, a widely respected journalist and experienced member of the North Carolina Capitol Press Corps, died unexpectedly Saturday morning. He was 43.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

This week in state politics, a conversation about crossover week, a decade's old legislative tradition in which a self-mandated deadline requires bills to advance from one chamber to another, or die.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics podcast, a conversation with Jessica Huseman, senior reporting fellow at ProPublica.

NC Legislative building
NC General Assembly

The General Assembly has completed the override of the governor's veto of a measure reducing the state Court of Appeals from 15 judges to 12.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

 

Governor Roy Cooper’s political battle continues with the Republican-led General Assembly. The state House and Senate voted this week to override Cooper’s veto of a bill to consolidate the state elections and ethics boards.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Updated 11:50 a.m., 4/28/2017

Thursday's crossover deadline came and went with a bang. Debate got heated when House Minority Leader Darren Jackson (D-Wake) objected to a final vote on House Bill 113. The measure allows for private citizens to take their local governments and police departments to court for failing to comply with immigration law enforcement.

It was clear Jackson believed Republicans violated a bi-partisan agreement on which bills would get a final vote just ahead of the deadline--Jackson said HB 113 was not one of them. Nonetheless, Jackson backed down when it was clear he was being outmaneuvered by the GOP leadership. The bill survived crossover and moved on to the Senate.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

At the General Assembly it's "crossover week." That means lawmakers in Raleigh are scurrying about and busier than usual as they try to advance dozens of bills before a self-mandated cutoff for legislation to cross over from one chamber to the other.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNC Politics Podcast, a conversation with long-time political reporter Mark Binker.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a conversation about the projected effects of tax cuts, a constitutional challenge to the General Assembly, judicial restructuring and a failed craft beer proposal.

Blue Ridge Community College hopes to offer a degree in craft beer brewing starting this fall.
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr, Creative Commons

Lawmakers are abandoning efforts to increase the self-distribution limit for craft brewers.

school bus
Shinichi Sugiyama / Flickr, Creative Commons

A bi-partisan bill would make it easier for charter schools in North Carolina to get disadvantaged students to class.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

A statewide non-profit and 10 North Carolina citizens are suing the Republican-led Legislature over a special session held last year to pass laws that eroded the governor's power.

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

This week in state politics, a conversation about a number of high-profile, yet long-shot proposals at the General Assembly.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

Policymakers in Raleigh filed some symbolic proposals this week that are not expected to advance. One seeks to ban same-sex marriage, while another would require the University of North Carolina and N.C. State to leave the ACC Conference for its boycott over House Bill 2.

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about go-nowhere bills, crossover and other proposals at the state legislature with Western Carolina University Political Science Professor Chris Cooper.

photo of North Carolina State Capitol Building
Nathanial Johnson / Flickr

Two weeks after the repeal of House Bill 2, several new proposals are working their way through the General Assembly. A group of House Republicans filed a bill that aims to ban same-sex marriage in North Carolina. The bill claims the U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage is “null and void in the state of North Carolina.”

exterior of the NC State Legislature
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

Following last week's compromise on a repeal of House Bill 2, lawmakers turned their attention to a number of other notable issues including tax cuts, environmental regulations, executive authority, board of governor's elections, state courts and school calendars. 

WUNCPolitics Podcast
WUNC

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast, a conversation about state, national and international politics with Dan Boylan, former reporter for the NC Insider.

Max Cooper Photography

Thirty years ago Chapel Hill Town Council member Joe Herzenberg made history when he became the first openly gay elected official in the South. Today there are 13 openly-LGBTQ individuals serving in elected office in North Carolina. The social and political climate in the state has evolved dramatically in three decades, but many argue that the heated debate around House Bill 2 shows that LGBTQ issues are still politically divisive.

Durty Bull Brewing Company just north of downtown Durham
Jeff Tiberii / WUNC

The king of beers is, well, still the king of beers. But the hundreds of small breweries, including many in North Carolina, are quickly gaining steam.

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