Politics & Government

Political news

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

With the Republican National Convention in Cleveland now over, the national political spotlight turns to the Democrats, who will nominate their candidate in Philadelphia next week. After that, it's onto the final three-month stretch of this ultra-marathon race. North Carolina is again a swing state and expected to be a regular part of the political terrain through November.

The Republican Party has gathered in Cleveland to officially declare Donald J. Trump as the 2016 presidential nominee.

While Trump supporters hope to "Make America Great Again," many GOP establishment politicians opted not to attend the festivities. And Ted Cruz’s refusal to endorse Trump draws criticism from the crowd.

Volunteers from Project Refugee Smile watch Turkish residents take to the street during the coup.
Farris Barakat

It’s been an eventful few days for Raleigh native Farris Barakat. He’s in southern Turkey, working with Project Refugee Smiles, a volunteer group that provides dental care to Syrians in refugee camps.

The WUNCPolitics Podcast returns, just in time to say goodbye to one of our own.

Managing Editor For News Dave DeWitt is joined by Capitol Bureau Chief Jeff Tiberii and Capitol Reporter Jorge Valencia to talk immigration, Donald Trump and the North Carolina GOP.

Workers at a Piedmont Improvement Project site.
NCDOT / NCDOT

The state is expanding track capacity on the rail line connecting Raleigh and Charlotte. It's part of the Piedmont Improvement Project, which received $520 million dollars in federal funding.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

Donald Trump announces Mike Pence will be his running mate in his bid for the White House.

Trump delayed the decision last night in the wake of the attack in Nice, France. He revealed his choice of the Indiana governor on Twitter earlier today. His decision comes as the Republican party gears up for its convention in Cleveland.

And on the Democratic side of the ticket, Bernie Sanders steps aside and endorses Hillary Clinton as the presidential nominee. Meanwhile, legal challenges to North Carolina's voter ID requirements continue in the courts.

a man taking a photo of another man for an ID card.
Jorge Valencia / WUNC

Like many immigrants, Luis Parra left his home in Mexico looking for prosperity. When he got to the United States 20 years ago, he worked in landscaping, and then in construction.

"Now I do interior trim, which is more detail, more precise. I really like it," he said.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

​North Carolina's House Bill 2 and the state budget dominated the headlines during this year's legislative short session. But the bills that got less attention could also have a huge impact across the state.

One of them places regulations on the footage caught by police body cameras, and declares those tapes are not public records. That same bill also establishes the first statewide needle exchange program.

Phil Berger Jr.
Phil Berger for Judge Campaign

A familiar name in state politics could have a prime spot on this fall's ballot because of a proposal passed by state lawmakers.

Phil Berger Jr. is the son of Senate Pro Tem Phil Berger (R-Rockingham), one of the most powerful officials in North Carolina. The younger Berger is a former district attorney who again is seeking public office after losing a bid for the state's 6th Congressional District seat in 2014.

N.C. General Assembly, State Legislature
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Lawmakers adjourned for the year early Saturday morning following a short session at the General Assembly marked with limited acrimony, plenty of debate over House Bill 2 and the departure of several long-serving members.

State Senator Tom Apodaca
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

The General Assembly adjourned late Friday and lawmakers headed home.

They passed a $22.3 billion budget before they left, giving state employees a small raise and setting aside more money for the rainy day fund. They also made a small tweak to House Bill 2, the so-called bathroom bill.

Composite photo of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.
U.S. Embassy and Gage Skidmore / flickr

Updated July 6 at 7:06 a.m.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump fired up supporters at two separate rallies in North Carolina Tuesday, as both presumptive presidential candidates sought to gain a lead in the battleground state.

photo of NC Legislature
creative commons

State lawmakers completed a chaotic final day of the legislative session in Raleigh on Friday, giving final approval to a $22.34 billion dollar state budget before sending it on to the Governor.

Image of bathroom sign
The LEAF Project / Flickr Creative Commons

North Carolina lawmakers tweaked the controversial law known as House Bill 2 in the last hours of the state’s legislative session on Friday night, restoring the right to sue in state court for discriminatory firings.

It’s first new WUNCPolitics podcast of the fiscal year. As the budget is passed, we look at what’s most significant and what’s under the radar. Also, the behind-the-scenes wrangling over changes to HB2.

Managing Editor For News Dave DeWitt is joined by Capitol Bureau Jeff Tiberii, Capitol Reporter Jorge Valencia, and Jess Clark, Fletcher Fellow for Education Policy Reporting.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

The United States Supreme Court issued decisions this week in several high profile cases related to abortion restrictions and immigration regulations.

The high court also agreed to hear North Carolina's redistricting suit. Their decisions could affect voters in November.

Photo: North Carolina's Old State Capitol building.
Soggy6 / Flickr

Lawmakers convened in Raleigh nearly a month ago for a short session to address the state's budget. But legislators have proposed measures on other items including bills on coal ash, light rail and sanctuary cities.

Also this week, Senator Fletcher Hartsell, a Republican from Concord, was indicted on charges of illegal campaign expenditures. The long-serving member in the Senate says he will not resign.

coal ash
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Republican lawmakers and Governor Pat McCrory have reached a compromise over coal ash avoiding another round in the courts.

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrest.
Wikimedia Commons

Editor's note: This story has been updated with the most recent action from the state Legislature.  

Republican lawmakers in the state Senate have passed a provision that would allow the state to withhold school and road funding from cities, towns and counties that don't comply with state immigration laws. The change would also prohibit local governments from issuing their own identification cards to people who are in the country without papers.

North Carolina State Legislature
Dave Crosby / Flickr

Editor's note: This story has been updated with the most recent action from the state Legislature.

State Senators approved a budget Tuesday night following more than an hour of review and debate.

Photo: The North Carolina General Assembly's Legislative Building
Jorge Valencia

Republican leaders at the General Assembly are working to wrap up the short session.

Today the Senate is considering a flurry of bills, including some of the most controversial legi slation of the session. One proposal could change the way police officers do their work and another could reorganize the Asheville City Council.

Durham, Durham Rescue Mission, Golden Belt Historic District
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Despite opposition, it’s looking more like the Golden Belt Local Historic District will include a controversial block of property owned by the Durham Rescue Mission.

Durham’s Planning Commission and the Historic Preservation Commission support protecting the last of the old mill houses near the historic Golden Belt manufacturing factories.

A body camera on a North Charleston police officer.
Ryan Johnson / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in the North Carolina House have voted in favor of a bill that would keep police body camera video out of the public record. Under the provision, the footage wouldn't be personnel records either.

Roy Cooper and Pat McCrory
File photo / WUNC

Incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory and his challenger Democrat Roy Cooper appeared together on stage for the first time in their heated race for the Governorship.

PHOTOS: Hillary Clinton Campaigns In Raleigh

Jun 22, 2016
Hillary Clinton speaks in Raleigh
Elizabeth Baier / WUNC

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton made her first campaign stop in North Carolina since the end of the primary season.

She told several thousand supporters at the Exposition Center at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh that if elected, she would launch a job creation plan during her first hundred days in office.

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