Politics & Government

Political news

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

Governor Pat McCrory made his re-election bid official this week as candidate filing began.

And Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump will be in Raleigh tonight to convince North Carolinians to send him to the White House.

Meanwhile, the country's 355th mass shooting this year prompts renewed debate about the political influence of the NRA. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with political junkie Ken Rudin about the latest.

A map of North Carolina's Interstate highways.
Algorerhythms / Wikipedia

Congress has has approved a five-year highway bill that would designate two planned routes from the Triangle to coastal ports as future interstate highways. They include a corridor from Raleigh to Norfolk, Virginia, and from Garner to Morehead City, then continuing to the Wilmington area.

Canada plans to bring in 10,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year and an additional 15,000 by the end of February.
Russell Watkins / Flickr Creative Commons

In stark contrast to the United States, Canada is preparing to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees beginning December 10. The plan will bring 10,000 refugees to the country by the end of the calendar year and 15,000 more by the end of February 2016.

All of the refugees will be screened in a two-step process by the United Nations and Canadian authorities before resettlement. 

Carmen Rodriguez, third from left, was one of six protesters who blocked traffic in front of governor's executive mansion
Jorge Valencia

When Carmen Rodriguez was 16, she was a high-achieving high school student in Mexico’s Oaxaca state. Her father, who owned a small construction company, provided for her and her siblings. She didn’t need to leave.

Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC)
United States Government

U.S. Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC) broke ranks with his Republican colleagues to vote against a proposal that would restrict the country's intake of Syrian and Iraqi refugees.

In a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan, Jones said he would not vote for a measure that provides any funding for the program that allows those refugees to resettle in the United States.

State Senator Tom Apodaca
Dave DeWitt

Another powerful member of the North Carolina Senate will retire next year. Republican Tom Apodaca of Henderson County will not seek an eighth term in the General Assembly.

N.C. Political Roundup

Nov 24, 2015
Rep. Walter Jones (R-NC)
United States Government

The United States House of Representatives passed a bill last week to restrict Syrian and Iraqi refugees admission to the United States until more stringent security measures are in place.

Rep. Walter Jones (R - N.C. 3rd District) was one of two GOP members to vote against the bill, saying it was too hastily passed and requires further discussion. 

An image of Republican Renee Ellmers
Public Domain

North Carolina has 13 members in the United States House of Representatives. Ten are currently Republicans and next week each is expected to file paperwork to run for another term. However, the road to re-election looks different for some members of the GOP.

Image of Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie
kenrudinpolitics.com

In the wake of the Paris attacks, the U.S. House passed a bill to ban all refugees from Syria until stringent background checks are conducted.

And the two leading candidates for North Carolina governor, Republican incumbent Pat McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper, both say the state needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until the federal government provides assurances about security concerns. The debate raises new questions about the government's surveillance methods and privacy matters.

In the South, African-American and Latino coalitions are coming together to support civil rights and immigration rights.
Fibonacci Blue / Flickr Creative Commons

In the last several decades state legislatures across the South have considered measures to limit the rights and privileges of immigrant populations. In response, new coalitions have formed between traditional civil rights groups and nascent immigrant rights organizations.

These new groups have leveraged political power to affect change in states like Mississippi and Alabama.

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