NPR Music

The Record
8:03 am
Mon June 3, 2013

How To Cover A Dance Track

Umphrey McGee playing Stubbs in Austin, Texas, the night the band covered Daft Punk's "Get Lucky."
Abby Matthews

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:56 pm

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Music Interviews
4:11 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Eleanor Friedberger Unashamed Of Her Favorite Sounds

Eleanor Friedberger's new solo album is Personal Record.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

Eleanor Friedberger was born in 1976, a little too late to have experienced much of that decade's music firsthand. But the singer-songwriter says she quickly made up for lost time.

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Music Interviews
5:22 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Quadron: For Love Of The Slow Jam

Quadron is the duo of Robin Hannibal and Coco O. Their new album is called Avalanche.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:33 am

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat June 1, 2013

City And Colour: A Musician Unplugs To Make A Connection

Dallas Green, once a member of the post-hardcore group Alexisonfire, now makes much quieter music as City and Colour. His fourth solo album is The Hurry and the Harm.
Dustin Rabin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 3:21 pm

City and Colour is the stage name of Canadian singer-songwriter Dallas Green. Once upon a time, he was a member of the post-hardcore band Alexisonfire, which self-identified as "the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife fight." But Green had a different side to him, too.

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The Record
8:03 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Five Musicians Who Make Borrowing Sound Original

Valerie June's first album, Pushin' Against A Stone, will be out in August.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:35 am

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The Record
8:02 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Homemade Music Before YouTube, Fruity Loops Or Bandcamp

Interior of Enjoy the Experience.
Courtesy of Sinecure Books

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:57 am

A tween homeschooled by her veterinarian parents who wants to be a singer. A husband-wife duo taken with psychedelia, swinging, no-budget horror movies and the teachings of guru Sai Baba. A New Jersey truck driver who hoped Waylon Jennings would sing his songs. A Dallas musician who looks like a cross between Miles Davis and your high school chemistry professor. A scrawny Minnesotan Ph.D. student with a Barry White-deep baritone.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:18 pm
Wed May 29, 2013

100 Years After The Riot, The 'Rite' Remains

Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the San Francisco Symphony.
Bill Swerbenski San Francisco Symphony

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:51 am

One hundred years ago, a landmark of modern music was unveiled before a Paris audience. And that audience famously and mercilessly greeted it with boos, jeers and hisses. It was the premiere of the Ballets Russes' The Rite of Spring.

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The Record
10:54 am
Wed May 29, 2013

What It Means When 'Hip' Albums Top The Charts

Daft Punk's album Random Access Memories sold 339,000 copies in its first week in stores, the second highest total for any new album in 2013.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:50 pm

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Arts & Culture
4:44 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Coming Home: The Woody Guthrie Center Opens In Tulsa

Outside the Woody Guthrie Center, there's a large mural of Guthrie holding his guitar bearing the phrase, "This Machine Kills Fascists."
Brett Deering WireImage

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Woody Guthrie's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. The singer-songwriter left Oklahoma and traveled the nation, composing some of the best-known songs of his time and ours. But to many in the state, his progressive political views did not fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to a full restoration as Oklahoma opens his archives.

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Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Quincy Jones: The Man Behind The Music

Legendary music producer Quincy Jones.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:33 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 5, 2001.

Quincy Jones is one of those people to whom the word "legendary" is often attached. So it was no surprise when, on May 18, the 80-year-old Jones was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame.

Jones grew up poor on the south side of Chicago during the Depression, but moved to Seattle when he was 10. It was there, as a teenager, that Jones befriended and began collaborating with Ray Charles — a friendship that would remain strong until Charles' death in 2004.

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