NPR Music

Deceptive Cadence
12:58 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Great Danes: Three Symphonic Albums By Danish Composers

A 1931 portrait of Danish composer Carl Nielsen by Sigurd Swane. Nielsen's symphonies are still undervalued.
Alfredo Dagli Orti The Art Arc

Denmark may be small — smaller than West Virginia — but its musical impact is disproportionately big. Since the late 19th century, some of the best symphonists have hailed from the Scandinavian country, and though they may not be household names in the U.S., their works have influence far beyond their homeland.

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The Record
4:33 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Are These The Next Crossover Country Stars?

Sam Hunt has written hits for both Kenny Chesney and Keith Urban. His debut album, Montevallo, is out on Oct. 27.
Chase Lauer Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 8:41 am

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Microphone Check
8:02 am
Tue October 21, 2014

T.I.: 'We Make Music That Come From The Heart'

T.I. at NPR's New York City bureau.
Polina Yamshchikov for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 10:36 am

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Tiny Desk Concerts
4:41 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Anthony D'Amato: Tiny Desk Concert

Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 5:44 pm

Anthony D'Amato sings and writes in the tradition of Bruce Springsteen or Josh Ritter: His songs sound friendly musically, but they also tackle the difficult and the twisted. Like those great songwriters, D'Amato's work is universal without devolving into moping. There's also a spirit to these songs, as it's easy to imagine a crowd spontaneously backing these his powerful choruses.

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Music Articles
4:02 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Jessie Ware On Learning To Trust Herself

"I didn't know that it was going to be my career," Jessie Ware says. Her new album is titled Tough Love.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:41 am

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The Record
6:05 am
Sun October 19, 2014

The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Future Hall Of Famers? Green Day's Tre Cool (from left), Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt in New York City in 1994.
Ken Schles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 16, 2014 11:27 am

As a music geek, I often find myself in conversations, either online or over cocktails, about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Indeed, I've been nerding out about the Hall since last Thursday, when the institution announced its shortlist for induction into the Hall Class of 2015. And when I find myself in polite but argumentative company debating the Rock Hall, I have an approach I use.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:34 am
Sun October 19, 2014

After 200 Years, A Schubert Song Still Resonates

Scottish-American soprano Mary Garden (1874-1967) portrayed Goethe's character Gretchen, known as Marguerite in Charles Gounod's opera Faust.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Mon November 3, 2014 7:32 pm

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Tiny Desk Concerts
6:34 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Ásgeir: Tiny Desk Concert

Susan Hale Thomas NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 5:04 pm

When he was 20, Ásgeir Trausti Einarsson released an album in Iceland, sung in Icelandic, with many of the words written by his father. Dýrð í dauðaþögn became the biggest-selling debut in Icelandic music history.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:33 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Postlude To A Kiss: Scriabin's Raging 'Poem Of Ecstasy'

Alexander Scriabin originally set out to write a piece called "Orgiastic Poem," centered on physical ecstasy, but later decided to alter the title to something more ambiguous.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 11:03 am

I love composer anniversaries because they afford us opportunities to look at musicians anew, and 2015 will mark the centenary of the death of Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. It's quite possible that you've never heard of Scriabin, but take comfort in the fact that even his biographer said, "No one was more famous during their lifetime, and few were more quickly ignored after death."

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Deceptive Cadence
4:05 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Twenty Years Later, 'Klinghoffer' Still Draws Protests

Several hundred protesters picket the opening night of the Metropolitan Opera season at Lincoln Center, Sept. 22, 2014. "You will be made to destroy that set," Jeffrey Wiesenfeld said.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:26 pm

The Metropolitan Opera in New York is bracing for one of the more controversial productions in its history. Since its first performance more than 20 years ago, some critics have charged that composer John Adams' The Death of Klinghoffer is anti-Israel, and even anti-Semitic. But the opera's supporters dispute that. They argue that Klinghoffer is a dramatic masterpiece that deserves to make its Met debut on Monday.

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