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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Tupelo Man Who Sent Ricin Letters To Obama Gets 25-Year Sentence

James Everett Dutschke, seen here as investigators searched his house last spring, was convicted of sending letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:12 pm

After late wrangling that included a threat to withdraw his guilty plea, J. Everett Dutschke accepted a 25-year prison sentence Monday, a year after he was arrested for sending poison-laced letters to President Obama and others.

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The Two-Way
7:20 am
Tue May 20, 2014

In China, Anger At U.S. Hacking Charges — And Claims Of Hypocrisy

The building housing China's Unit 61398, a division of the army linked to hacking operations, is seen in Shanghai last year. The U.S. says the group worked to steal trade secrets from American companies.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:07 pm

China says U.S. charges against five Chinese military officials for allegedly hacking into American computers amount to hypocrisy, citing U.S. surveillance and wiretapping. The country's foreign ministry summoned the American ambassador Monday night to complain about the charges.

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The Two-Way
7:59 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Thai Army Declares Martial Law But Says It's No Coup

Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Thai Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha (front) during a military parade in January. The army has declared martial law amid months of political unrest.
Apichart Weerawong AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:28 pm

Thailand's army has declared martial law less than two weeks after Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was thrown out of office by the country's Constitutional Court.

The Associated Press reports:

"The army said in a statement that it had taken the action to 'keep peace and order,' and soldiers entered several private television stations that are sympathetic to protesters.

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The Two-Way
7:13 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Credit Suisse Pleads Guilty To Helping U.S. Tax Evaders

Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department on Monday. Holder announced that Credit Suisse had agreed to pay $2.6 billion in a criminal settlement. With him are IRS Commissioner John Koskinen (left) and Deputy Attorney General James Cole.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:03 pm

Credit Suisse AG has pleaded guilty to helping wealthy Americans evade taxes in offshore havens, and the Swiss bank has agreed to pay U.S. authorities $2.6 billion in penalties, the Justice Department has announced.

Attorney General Eric Holder told a news conference in Washington on Monday that the Swiss bank had "engaged in an extensive and wide-ranging conspiracy ... to help tax cheats dodge U.S. taxes."

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The Two-Way
6:08 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

U.S. Coast Guard Calls Off Atlantic Search For 4 British Sailors

The missing yacht Cheeki Rafiki disappeared on Saturday with four experienced offshore sailors aboard.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:21 pm

The first person to sail single-handedly and nonstop around the world has joined others in urging the U.S. Coast Guard to resume a search for four missing British yachtsman who disappeared aboard a 40-foot sailboat in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean last week.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

U.S., Nigeria Reach Deal On Intelligence Sharing

The United States and Nigeria have reached a deal to share intelligence in the country's effort to find the more than 200 girls kidnapped by the militant group Boko Haram.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that the U.S. will now share "all source" intelligence with Nigeria. In simple terms, it means it will share intelligence analysis but withhold raw intelligence.

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Selfie, Unfriend, Hashtag: From Your Teen's Phone To The Dictionary

Selfie is one of the 150-plus new words added to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:38 pm

In school, many of us were sent to dictionaries to look up words we didn't know.

Now, dictionaries are coming to us, filling themselves up with terms that may already feel overly familiar.

More than 150 new words and definitions have been added to the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, the publisher announced Monday. The list includes selfie, hashtag, big data and unfriend.

"So many of these new words show the impact of online connectivity to our lives and livelihood," Peter Sokolowski, a Merriam-Webster editor, said in a statement.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

NASA Chief Dismisses Concern Over Russia Quitting Space Station

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks during a news conference in Berlin on Monday. Bolden said no single country was indispensable to the International Space Station's success.
Michael Sohn AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:04 pm

NASA's Administrator Charles Bolden says that Russia's plan to end cooperation on the International Space Station after 2020 will not have an impact on the success of the orbital platform.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Victories In Oregon, Utah For Same-Sex-Marriage Proponents

Julia Fraser (from left), Jessica Rohrbacher, Ken Brashier and Andrew Wallace await a ruling in the marriage equality case, so they can go into the building and get their marriage licenses.
Steve Dykes AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:19 pm

This post was updated at 6:30 p.m. ET.

Federal judges in two states have ruled in favor of same-sex marriage, with a decision in Oregon overturning a ban on the practice and another in Utah ordering officials to recognize more than 1,000 marriages that had been thrown into legal limbo.

In Oregon, opponents of gay marriage had asked a superior court to stay the judge's decision to give them a chance to argue their case against repealing the ban, but the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected their emergency motion earlier today.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Occupy Wall Street Activist Gets 90 Days For Assaulting Officer

Sarah Wellington stands in front of the courthouse after the sentencing of Cecily McMillan in New York, on Monday. McMillan, an Occupy Wall Street activist convicted of assaulting a police officer, was sentenced to 90 days in jail.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 3:55 pm

An Occupy Wall Street activist convicted of assaulting a police officer who was arresting her during a March 2012 protest has been sentenced to three months in jail.

"A civilized society must not allow an assault to be committed under the guise of civil disobedience," said Justice Ronald Zweibel. However, "The court finds that a lengthy sentence would not serve the interests of justice in this case," he said.

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