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The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Sarin Attack On Syrian Civilians Is A 'War Crime,' U.N. Says

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who received the report on Syria's chemical weapons over the weekend from professor Ake Sellstrom, expressed his "profound shock and regret" at its findings.
Paulo Filgueiras UN Photo

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:09 am

Chemical weapons were used in Syria "on a relatively large scale" on Aug. 21, says U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who issued a report by U.N. inspectors Monday. The attack killed civilians, "including many children," and constitutes a "war crime," Ban wrote. He expressed his "profound shock and regret" at the findings.

Ban received the report over the weekend from professor Ake Sellstrom of Sweden, who headed the inspection team in the incident that took place near Damascus. The secretary-general briefed the Security Council on the report earlier Monday.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Washington Navy Yard, Site Of Shooting, Has Long History

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth arrive at the Washington Navy Yard on June 9, 1939, to join President Franklin Roosevelt on a cruise down the Potomac River to Mount Vernon, Va.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:10 am

The sprawling Washington Navy Yard, scene of a deadly shooting Monday, is the Navy's oldest shore establishment and has long been considered the "ceremonial gateway" to the nation's capital.

The yard went into operation at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it employs thousands of people and is regarded as the "quarterdeck of the Navy" for its role as headquarters for the Naval District Washington.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

South Korean Soldiers Kill Man Trying To Cross To North

South Korean soldiers patrol along a military fence near the demilitarized zone dividing the two Koreas in the border city of Paju in April.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 3:29 pm

Thousands of North Korean defectors have made their way to the South, but it rarely goes in the opposite direction. So, news that South Korean troops at the border shot and killed a man trying to swim north across the Imjin River is unusual.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Former U.N. Inspector: Syria Plan 'Optimistic,' Requires Troops

Secretary of State John Kerry discusses the U.S.-Russia plan to eliminate Syria's chemical weapons with top British diplomat William Hague (left) and French diplomat Laurent Fabius, on Monday. Former weapons inspector David Kay says the plan includes "unrealistic" deadlines.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:26 am

The U.S.-Russia plan to rid Syria of chemical weapons by next summer faces many hurdles and includes "unrealistic" deadlines, says former U.N. weapons inspector David Kay, who worked on efforts to detail chemical weapons in Iraq.

Kay says the plan will require an international military presence — "boots on the ground" — to make sure the weapons don't fall into the wrong hands.

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Attack At The Navy Yard: Gunman And 12 Victims Killed

Workers emerge from a building after a deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday. There are multiple injuries and deaths, and one gunman is dead. Police say they are searching for two other "potential" shooters.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:31 pm

(We're constantly updating the top of this post and adding to it below as well.)

The nation's capital went on high alert Monday after a shooting attack at the city's U.S. Navy Yard left at least 12 victims and one gunman dead and injured 8 others.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Homeless Man With 'Great Heart' Finds $42,000, Turns It In

A homeless man turned in a backpack stuffed with cash and travelers checks to Boston police. A passport that was with the bag helped police find the person it belonged to.
Boston Police

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:30 am

"A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a 'great heart,' " The Boston Herald reports.

The Herald adds that:

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Mon September 16, 2013

How To Watch As The Costa Concordia Is (Hopefully) Righted

The view Monday from shore as work began to pull the Costa Concordia upright. The box-like structure on the ship's port side is one of the refloating caissons that will stabilize the ship.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:38 am

  • NPR's Sylvia Poggioli on the salvaging of the Costa Concordia

The effort to shift the luxury cruise ship Consta Concordia into an upright position has begun, and several news outlets are streaming their coverage of what's said to be the biggest such operation of its kind ever.

Reuters is one good option. It has embedded its video feed in its live blogging of the operation.

The BBC's webcast, meanwhile, has the advantage of allowing you to mute the sound.

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Book News: Man Booker Prize To Be Opened To Americans

British authors such as Hilary Mantel will soon have some competition from across the pond, according to organizers of the Man Booker Prize.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:11 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Mon September 16, 2013

More Rain Expected As Helicopters Search For Stranded Flood Victims

Miranda Woodard and Joey Schendel salvage and clean property after days of flooding in Hygiene, Colo. Mountain towns that had been cut off for days by massive flooding slowly reopened Monday, to reveal cabins toppled, homes ripped from their foundations and everything covered in a thick layer of muck.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 6:02 pm

This post was last updated at 6 p.m. ET.

Helicopters were back in the air on Monday over the 15 counties across Colorado's Front Range where historic flooding has killed at least seven people, left hundreds more stranded and unaccounted for, and forced nearly 12,000 to evacuate their homes.

In a news conference, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said 21 helicopters were conducting "search and rescue missions," and other teams were trying to assess the damage to transportation infrastructure.

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