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The Two-Way
8:17 am
Thu June 26, 2014

'We Welcome' Syrian Airstrikes On ISIS, Iraqi Leader Maliki Says

Iraqis who have fled as the Sunni extremist group ISIS has spread in northern Iraq enter a camp for displaced people between the Iraqi city of Mosul and the Kurdish city of Irbil on Thursday. Iraq's leader says he welcomes Syria's attacks on ISIS.
Hussein Malla AP

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 7:07 pm

With both Iraq and Syria facing threats from the extremist group ISIS, a recent attack by Syrian warplanes along the countries' border was a welcome development, says Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. He says that he didn't ask for the airstrikes — but he doesn't have a problem with them, either.

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The Two-Way
7:23 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Reports Of New Fighting Rattle Ukraine's Truce As Kerry Urges Russia To Help

A man who lives in Ukraine's Donetsk region shows part of a shell that exploded in the yard of his house Wednesday, after a reported mortar attack by Ukrainian government forces Tuesday. The area is under a tense cease-fire that will expire Friday.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:50 pm

An exchange of mortar fire has been reported in eastern Ukraine, where government troops and pro-Russian separatist forces had been observing an uneasy cease-fire in the past week. The news comes as Secretary of State John Kerry says Russia could face sanctions if it doesn't help end the violence.

Russian state news media are reporting explosions near the airport in the eastern Ukrainian city of Kramatorsk, where the armed groups reportedly absorbed and returned mortar fire. Similar clashes were reported earlier this week.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Book News: Ana Maria Matute, Who Wrote Of War-Torn Spain, Dies

Spanish novelist Ana Maria Matute is pictured in 2010 in Barcelona, Spain, after winning the Cervantes Prize.
Manu Fernandez AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
12:03 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Report Questions U.S. Policy On Overseas Drone Strikes

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, in 2010. A new report questions the U.S. policy of using armed drones abroad to carry out attacks on suspected terrorists.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 3:18 am

U.S. strategy that relies on armed drones to kill terrorism suspects overseas "rests on questionable assumptions and risks increasing instability and escalating costs," according to a year-long study by a group of prominent military, intelligence and foreign policy experts.

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The Two-Way
8:49 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

North Korea Threatens War Over New Seth Rogen Comedy

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 8:39 am

While it's hard to imagine Seth Rogen and James Franco being the proximate cause of World War III, the stars of Pineapple Express have prompted the latest round of blustery threats from North Korea.

Pyongyang has promised "merciless" retaliation if the duo's latest comedy, The Interview, is released as scheduled in October.

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The Two-Way
6:43 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

SOS Note, Prison ID Reportedly Found In Chinese-Made Pants

An alleged cry for help from a Chinese worker, found in a pair of pants.
Amnesty UK Twitter

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:34 pm

When Karen Wisinska finally got around to trying on a pair of pants she bought three years ago in her native Northern Ireland, what she says she found in a pocket was a handwritten "cry for help" from a Chinese prison sweatshop.

The BBC says she posted pictures of a prison identification card wrapped in a note headlined in English "SOS! SOS! SOS!" on Facebook and got a rough translation that shocked and sickened her. She then sent the items to Amnesty International.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Beijing Blasts U.S. Plan To Name Road By Embassy After Dissident

An undated photo provided by Voice of America shows Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. He was jailed in 2008 for promoting human rights. An amendment in Congress proposes renaming the street in front of the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C., in his honor.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 8:24 pm

Beijing is fuming over a provision slipped into a State Department budget to change the name of the street fronting the Chinese Embassy in Washington to "Liu Xiaobo Plaza," in honor of the jailed dissident and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

The amendment, proposed by Virginia Republican Rep. Frank Wolf, would change the name of the street currently known as International Place. Wolf says it would send "a clear and powerful message that the United States remains vigilant and resolute in its commitment to safeguard human rights around the globe."

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

U.S. Vs. Germany In The World Cup: What To Look For

U.S. midfielder Jermaine Jones warms up during a training session at Recife's Pernambuco Arena Wednesday, one day before the Americans face Germany in a decisive Group G soccer match. The game begins at noon, ET.
Patrik Stollarz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 8:28 am

Anticipation is building for the U.S. Men's National Team's showdown with Germany on Thursday. The Americans need a win or a tie to decide their own fate; a loss would mean they need help to advance to the round of 16.

The game will start at noon ET — when the other Group G match, between Portugal and Ghana, also starts. You can follow the game or just comment on the action here at The Two-Way. For now, we've rounded up analysis and predictions.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Federal Judges Reverse Gay-Marriage Bans In Utah, Indiana

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert addresses a crowd during a rally at the Western Republican Leadership Conference in Sandy, Utah, in April. Herbert reiterated his support of the state's same-sex marriage ban, which was struck down Wednesday by a federal panel.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 4:11 pm

This post updated at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Utah and Indiana are the latest states to see their bans on same-sex marriage struck down by a federal court, following rulings in both states Wednesday that found the prohibition unconstitutional.

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