Tommy Rieman in his office at Charlotte Bridge Home, with the action figure that bears his likeness.
Carol Jackson

Under different circumstances, Tommy Rieman could have been charged with a DUI when he got drunk and drove into a tree. But because he's a veteran he was enrolled in the state's first Veterans Treatment Court, a program designed to give support rather than punishment.

This chapter of Rieman's story starts in Iraq, 2003.

"Before the war started we were in Iraq, calling in air strikes you know?" he remembers. "I was 21, 22 years old. You're on top of the world."

A picture of a couple at a bench.
pedrosimoes / Flickr

This fall, all UNC-Chapel Hill students, faculty and staff will have learned the same definitions for "consent", "sexual assault" and "harassment". It's part of a new, mandatory, online training.

Christi Hurt works in Student Affairs and directs the Carolina Women's Center. She says the goal is to define terms simplify communication. Hurt says this lays the foundation for student groups and dorm life to spur discussion.

President Obama's choice to be the next attorney general grew up in a state where her parents fought for the right to vote.

Loretta Lynch is a North Carolina native who hails from a long line of preachers. Her academic talent propelled her into some of the country's elite institutions.

Now Lynch is trying to win Senate confirmation as the top U.S. law enforcement officer, as the first black woman in line to hold that job.

Lynch was born 55 years ago, in Greensboro, N.C., where sit-ins and protests provided a soundtrack to her youth.

Bob Jones, leader of the N.C. KKK, April 1965
Bruce Roberts / The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin

At one time North Carolina had more Ku Klux Klan members than all other the states combined, even though the state was seen as more racial progressive than others in the South.

The PBS documentary series American Experience explores this idea with its latest episode, Klansville U.S.A.

Callie Wiser is the film's director. She talked with Phoebe Judge about the rise and fall of the KKK in North Carolina:

Interview highlights:

crime scene tape
Ian Britton / Flickr/Creative Commons

Delays at North Carolina's State Crime Lab are a longstanding issue. Now, some local law enforcement agencies are seeking quicker assistance elsewhere.

Steve Williams heads Greensboro's Forensic Services division. He says that because rapes and homicides take precedence, the review of evidence for other crimes can take a very long time under the state system.

"It could take years to get a lot of the property crimes even looked at," Williams said.

City of Fayetteville Police Department

There’s an organization in Holly Springs that trains law enforcement officers across the country to better serve their communities.

The International Academy of Public Safety or IAPS, began training police and sheriff’s departments five years ago.  Today, more than 12,000 law enforcement officers in ten states have participated in their program. More than 3,000 of them are in North Carolina.

Chris Hoina is an expert trainer at IAPS.  He says one of their biggest success stories is in Jefferson Parrish, Louisiana.

Bladenboro, N.C.
Gary Dincher / Flickr Creative Commons


In August, 17-year-old Lennon Lacy was found dead in the small town of Bladenboro, N.C, hanging by his neck from a swing set.

Local police say Lacy killed himself, but Lacy's family says suspicious circumstances have raised questions about whether Lacy's death was a suicide or a lynching.

Durham Police at Jesus Huerta protest in December 2013
Laura Lee


Across the nation, protestors have taken to the street to call for reforms in police action. The protests come in the wake of  two grand juries declining to indict police officers who killed Eric Garner and Michael Brown.

From the coast to the mountains, activists in North Carolina have joined the movement calling for greater police accountability.

A picture of a yellow NCDOT truck.

Yellow Department of Transportation trucks have been used to disguise roving patrolmen. The North Carolina Highway Patrol used them for a pilot program in which troopers patrolled for people who illegally text while driving.

Lieutenant Jeff Gordon says it's hard for roadside troopers to see whether motorists are texting, and people are quick to stop if they see a police cruiser.

“So you need to be creative in ways of trying to get people to abide by the law. I wouldn't classify it as tricking people because it is a law, and laws need to be enforced.”

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that police officers don't necessarily violate a person's constitutional rights when they stop a car based on a mistaken understanding of the law. The ruling prompted a lone dissent from Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who warned that the court's decision could exacerbate public suspicion of police in some communities.