Health

Health
7:00 am
Fri July 2, 2010

Waste 2 Watts To Power Medical Devices

The Cell Saver

Rose Hoban reports on some young people who hope to contribute to the future of global health.

In the past, global health work tended to be limited to doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. But engineering plays a role in health care around the world. From infrastructure projects, to supporting medical equipment, engineers are becoming an essential part of the global health landscape.

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Health
7:00 am
Thu July 1, 2010

Durham Workers Test Condoms for Worldwide Distribution

FHI worker Joseph Galloway detects holes in condoms by filling them with water.
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

When people think of global health, they might picture heroic doctors or selfless nurses. But many others work behind the scenes in global health, doing work that’s much less sexy, but equally essential.  Some of those people work here in the Triangle in a lab that tests life-preserving and life-saving products shipped around the world. Central to their work is testing condoms for safety and effectiveness.  In the next installment of our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home, Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

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Health
7:00 am
Wed June 30, 2010

Cross-Cultural Research Provides Links to Durham

Study Coordinator Randy Rogers at Juneteenth Festival with research associates Kim Gibson and Alexandria Horne
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban explores how cross-cultural research can inform the process of working with people in North Carolina.

Drug treatments for HIV have given new hope to patients with the virus. But the Holy Grail for researchers is finding a way to prevent HIV from being transmitted in the first place. Scientists are testing vaccines, drugs, gels that kill the virus – all without success. The only way to prevent HIV transmission – still – is to convince people to change their behavior. And that’s not easy.  A group of people in Durham are trying to find better methods for HIV prevention – and they’re using techniques refined by researchers working in other cultures.

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Health
7:00 am
Tue June 29, 2010

Overseas Orphan Research Rocks the Conventional Wisdom in the US

Dr Phyllis Crain and one of the residence counselors talks with a boy outside a cottage at Crossnore.
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban reports for our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home.

When you say the word ‘orphanage’ what comes to mind for many people, are gloomy places of abuse and neglect, where kids are warehoused after losing family. For years, the assumption has been that foster families provide better care for kids in need than any institution could. But new research from overseas is challenging those beliefs – findings that kids in orphanages can do as well or better as kids taken into families. Now, that research is being embraced in the U S. And it’s starting to influence the policy dialogue about what to do with kids who need care outside their homes. 

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Health
10:20 am
Tue October 16, 2007

NC Voices: Health Of Elders

Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

People are living longer now than ever before in human history. By the year 2030, more than one-in-five people in the United States will be over the age of 65. The dream is to stay healthy into a ripe old age and die peacefully in your sleep. But the reality is likely to be quite different. Many people go through a long physical and mental decline before they die. As we wrap up our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

Health
10:18 am
Tue October 16, 2007

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 5

Emily Hanford reports for 'North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care.'

As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we’ve been reporting on the remarkable rise of Type 2 diabetes. That rise is due mostly to obesity; Emily Hanford traveled to two schools in eastern North Carolina to try to find out why it's such a problem -- and what's being done about it.

Health
10:57 am
Mon October 15, 2007

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful.

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.

Health
10:54 am
Mon October 15, 2007

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 4

Emily Hanford reports for our series 'North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care.'

Type-2 diabetes may be the plague of this century. Just 20 years ago, about 30 million people in the world had the disease. Today, it’s more than five times that many. It’s a frightening prospect for health, and the health care system. Here in North Carolina, diabetes is already a direct or contributing cause in one out of every five hospitalizations. That’s billions of dollars of every year. Experts say health care providers need more effective ways to treat diabetics so they don’t end up in the hospital. A group of clinics in eastern North Carolina is trying to do it with a new model for treating chronic disease.

Health
2:13 pm
Fri October 12, 2007

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 3

Emily Hanford reports for our series 'North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care.'

This week we're focusing on health care and the rise of diabetes in northeastern North Carolina. Yesterday we met Miranda Cofield, a 50 year old woman who recently lost her health insurance. She's African American, and she's poor. These factors put her at high risk of developing complications from diabetes. Statistically, Sterling Hamilton does not face the same risks.

Health
9:39 am
Thu October 11, 2007

NC Voices: Greener Hospitals

Katy Barron has more for our series `North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care.`

This week we’re examining the health care system and asking whether it actually promotes good health. Today, we look at health care facilities themselves. From toxic chemicals and medical waste, to round-the-clock energy and water use, the way hospitals are built and maintained can have serious effects on the patients inside and on the environment beyond. So as the population ages and hospital construction booms, the health care industry is examining the central creed of medicine "to do no harm" and applying it the environment too.

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