Health

Health
6:55 am
Wed December 22, 2010

Insurance Rates For Some Will Drop

Health insurance rates for some people are actually slated to go down... they're folks who can take advantage of the state's federally funded high risk insurance pool.

After the federal health reform bill passed in the spring, 23 states, including North Carolina, chose to create federally funded high risk pools for their residents. North Carolina's plan is called Inclusive Health, and it's run alongside an already-existing state funded high risk pool.

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Health
5:55 am
Tue December 21, 2010

It's Time For Medicare Drug Plan Re-enrollment

Credit NC DOI

In the fall, many workers have the opportunity to change their health insurance coverage. That’s true for Medicare beneficiaries as well. Seniors and people with disabilities covered by Medicare have until the new year to review and make changes to their plans. And this year, there are plenty of changes complicating matters.

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Health
5:00 am
Mon December 13, 2010

Simple Test For Ovarian Cancer Unlikely

Researchers have been looking for a way to screen women for ovarian cancer, and find it early. But a Duke researcher warns it might not be so simple.

Ovarian cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, in part because it's often found in its late stages. There's already a blood test, plus ultrasound... but the protocol's not that accurate. 

Duke gynecologist Laura Havrilesky says one reason why screening doesn't work so well is that ovarian cancer isn't just one disease, but many. And the dangerous cancers grow fast.

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Health
5:12 pm
Wed December 8, 2010

Dix Closure Imminent

Dorothea Dix Hospital
Credit NC DHHS

It looks like the closure of Dorothea Dix hospital will be almost complete by the year's end.   The state-run psychiatric facility in Raleigh has been slated for closure for years under the state's mental health reform. The only patients to remain on the downtown campus will be 30 minimum security criminal patients. 

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Health
5:00 am
Wed December 8, 2010

Remembering Elizabeth Edwards

Credit the Edwards Campaign

Elizabeth Edwards has died. The wife, health-care advocate, author, and mother passed away yesterday morning. She was 61 years old. Dave DeWitt reports.

On October 21, 2004, at a hotel in Kenosha Wisconsin, Elizabeth Edwards found a lump in her breast the size of a plumb. An election that could vault her husband into the vice presidency was just days away. She was the mother of three children.

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Health
5:50 pm
Tue December 7, 2010

Elizabeth Edwards Dies

Elizabeth Edwards died at her home in Chapel Hill this morning.  She was 61.  Edwards was the estranged wife of former North Carolina Senator and presidential candidate John Edwards.  A family statement says, ``Today we have lost the comfort of Elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family.''  Elizabeth Edwards was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004.

Health
7:00 am
Fri July 2, 2010

Waste 2 Watts To Power Medical Devices

The Cell Saver

Rose Hoban reports on some young people who hope to contribute to the future of global health.

In the past, global health work tended to be limited to doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. But engineering plays a role in health care around the world. From infrastructure projects, to supporting medical equipment, engineers are becoming an essential part of the global health landscape.

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Health
7:00 am
Thu July 1, 2010

Durham Workers Test Condoms for Worldwide Distribution

FHI worker Joseph Galloway detects holes in condoms by filling them with water.
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

When people think of global health, they might picture heroic doctors or selfless nurses. But many others work behind the scenes in global health, doing work that’s much less sexy, but equally essential.  Some of those people work here in the Triangle in a lab that tests life-preserving and life-saving products shipped around the world. Central to their work is testing condoms for safety and effectiveness.  In the next installment of our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home, Rose Hoban takes a visit to FHI’s product testing lab.

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Health
7:00 am
Wed June 30, 2010

Cross-Cultural Research Provides Links to Durham

Study Coordinator Randy Rogers at Juneteenth Festival with research associates Kim Gibson and Alexandria Horne
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban explores how cross-cultural research can inform the process of working with people in North Carolina.

Drug treatments for HIV have given new hope to patients with the virus. But the Holy Grail for researchers is finding a way to prevent HIV from being transmitted in the first place. Scientists are testing vaccines, drugs, gels that kill the virus – all without success. The only way to prevent HIV transmission – still – is to convince people to change their behavior. And that’s not easy.  A group of people in Durham are trying to find better methods for HIV prevention – and they’re using techniques refined by researchers working in other cultures.

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Health
7:00 am
Tue June 29, 2010

Overseas Orphan Research Rocks the Conventional Wisdom in the US

Dr Phyllis Crain and one of the residence counselors talks with a boy outside a cottage at Crossnore.
Credit Rose Hoban

Rose Hoban reports for our series, North Carolina Voices, Global Health Comes Home.

When you say the word ‘orphanage’ what comes to mind for many people, are gloomy places of abuse and neglect, where kids are warehoused after losing family. For years, the assumption has been that foster families provide better care for kids in need than any institution could. But new research from overseas is challenging those beliefs – findings that kids in orphanages can do as well or better as kids taken into families. Now, that research is being embraced in the U S. And it’s starting to influence the policy dialogue about what to do with kids who need care outside their homes. 

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