Education

Credit CPB

Two maps show new boundaries for Wake County Schools starting in 2016.
Wake County Board of Education

Candidate filing begins today for the Wake County Board of Education, and all nine seats will be on the November ballot.

Board-member turnover is likely, since all but one of the school board members will find themselves in the same district as another incumbent.

A picture of a laptop.
Kristoferb / Wikipedia

The Wake County Board of Education has voted to update its discipline policy.

The changes will limit the number of students in long-term suspension, according to Bren Elliot, Wake's Assistant Superintendent for Student Support Services, adding that principals will have more discretion to transfer students to an alternative web-based education track called SCORE.

Teacher, school, hallway
Jess Clark / WUNC

Lawmakers in the state House have renewed efforts to direct more money from school districts to charter schools.

My Teacher: The Last Day of School

Jun 10, 2016
Picture of student Jackson and teacher Myles in a math classroom.
Will McInerney / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series is exploring student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and trying to find out what it takes to make a connect in the classroom.

My Teacher: Tweeting AP US History

Jun 9, 2016
Picture of student Lena and teacher Drew in front of a classroom door.
Will McInerney / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series is exploring student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and trying to find out what it takes to make a connect in the classroom.

Fayetteville math teacher Kenneth Williams creates a life-sized right triangle in his classroom.
Jess Clark

Lawmakers in the state Senate plan to vote Thursday on a bill that would let students opt out of the integrated high school math sequence, and take a more traditional math sequence instead.

My Teacher: Using Stories to Connect

Jun 7, 2016
Student Patrick and teacher William stand in a biology class.
Will McInerney / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series is exploring student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and trying to find out what it takes to make a connect in the classroom.

Picture of student Ira and teacher Ms. Breeze in front of a brick wall.
Will McInerney / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series is exploring student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and trying to find out what it takes to make a connect in the classroom.

 

Today we meet Durham School of the Arts sophomore Ira Ilagan and her biology teacher Kelley Breeze. Ira wanted to talk with Ms. Breeze about a frightening moment that happened earlier this year. 

 

 

 

photo of Clyde Edgerton
clydeedgerton.com

Famed North Carolina author Clyde Edgerton is best known for his witty, character-driven novels about Southern life, like “Raney” and “Killer Diller.” He is now in the headlines for being banned from all public schools in New Hanover County where two of his children attend elementary school.

Student Ray Starn and teacher Mira Rahili stand in a classroom.
Will McInerney / WUNC

WUNC’s My Teacher Series is exploring student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and trying to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom.

In Durham, North Carolina, Riverside High School junior Ray Starn sat down and interviewed his creative writing teacher Mira Rahili. Ms. Rahili taught Ray first period, freshman year. It was the opening scene to his high school career. And the personal stories Ms. Rahili shared with that class helped Ray connect, have fun, and succeed at Riverside.  

My Teacher Logo
Keith Weston / WUNC

The My Teacher Series is an initiative from WUNC that seeks to highlight high school student-teacher relationships across North Carolina.

We're traveling the state and helping students interview teachers who have made a lasting impact in their lives. We want to hear the stories that student and teachers think are important, and we want to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom. You don't have to wait for us to show up to record and submit your story, though.

To commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the D-Day Invasion, some American high school students are traveling to Normandy, France to make sure the victims of World War II aren't forgotten.

An image of a mortar board crossed out.
Michael Kellen / Wikipedia

Researchers at Duke University have new, concrete evidence that dropping out of high school leads to joblessness, hardship and incarceration. But the same study also reveals ways to help dropouts have more positive outcomes.

New Hanover County Schools is considering a ban on 'jeggings.'
Chris RubberDragon / Flickr Creative Commons

If you’re a girl or woman in the U.S., chances are you have more than a few pairs of "jeggings." These tight, stretchy denim leggings are ubiquitous on high school and college campuses.  But board members of New Hanover County schools are considering banning them.

House lawmakers propose small increases in teacher pay based on years of experience.
www.audio-luci-store.it / Flickr

House lawmakers revealed a preliminary budget proposal Monday that gives pay raises to teachers based on individual experience.

Newly hired teachers and staff attend an orientation for Wake County Public Schools. Wake County teachers make more than most teachers in North Carolina.
Jess Clark / WUNC

The state's average teacher pay inched up to 41 in national rankings, according to a yearly report from the National Association of Educators. Last year North Carolina ranked 42nd.

The state's salary didn't increase significantly from the year prior, but it pulled ahead of Louisiana, which saw a sharp decline in teacher pay.

Middle school student Jojo works on a math assignment at Concord Middle.
Reema Khrais / WUNC

Lawmakers in a House committee on education spending released their budget proposal Thursday, and it includes several policy changes. One of those is  an adjustment to the A-F school grading system.

Hunter Schafer, 17, is a transgender student at the UNC School of the Arts.
Hunter Schafer / via Instagram

Hunter Schafer is one of several North Carolina residents challenging the state's controversial new discrimination law in federal court.

Fayetteville math teacher Kenneth Williams creates a life-sized right triangle in his classroom.
Jess Clark

The North Carolina Department of Instruction wants the state to maintain the new high school math sequence that some teachers and parents dislike.

DPI's proposed revisions to the state's academic standards would keep integrated math in place, but would revise many of the standards for clarity and move some standards into different grades.

John King
U.S. Department of Education / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Secretary of Education John King spoke out against North Carolina's controversial new law limiting bathroom access in public schools.

At a conference for education writers in Boston, King called the law known as HB 2 and a similar law in Mississippi "hateful," and said lawmakers should repeal it.

Teacher, school, hallway
Jess Clark / WUNC

Reductions in state funding have forced school districts across the state to cut millions from their budgets. Durham Public Schools is planning to cut more than 90 positions at the end of the month. But parents, employees and activists are questioning the district’s decision to cut employees closer to the classroom, while leaving in place administrative positions.

UNC School of the Arts high school junior Hunter Schafer breaks the law every time she uses the women's restroom at school.
Emme Black

One of the largest groups most affected by House Bill 2, or HB2,  is the state’s public school students. More than a million North Carolina students spend most of their day in facilities where they are now prohibited from using restrooms that do not correspond to the sex listed on their birth certificates. This new law presents problems for the state's transgender students and conflicts with several school districts’ practice of allowing students to use the restrooms that correspond to their gender identity.

a nationwide collaboration between NPR’s Ed Team and 20 member station reporters exploring how states pay for their public schools and why many are failing to meet the needs of their most vulnerable students.
Leigh Ann Cross

This story is part of the NPR reporting project “School Money,” a nationwide collaboration between NPR’s Ed Team and 20 member station reporters exploring how states pay for their public schools and why many are failing to meet the needs of their most vulnerable students.

Student protestors rallied outside the UNC Board of Governors meeting.
Jess Clark

About a hundred protestors rallied outside the UNC Board of Governors meeting in Chapel Hill Friday morning. Many protestors said they were there to object to the election of UNC System President Margaret Spellings and to her directive to colleges and universities to comply with HB2.

A handful of student protesters have occupied the administration building at Duke University for nearly a week. The demonstration is a response to an incident in which a white administrator hit a black parking attendant with his car. The attendant, Shelvia Underwood, alleges Duke executive Vice President Tallman Trask then used a racial slur in frustration. Protesters say the alleged incident raises questions about the way the school treats minimum wage employees, and have demanded Trask's resignation and a living wage for Duke employees. The university says it will negotiate.

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