Education

This section collects Education stories from WUNC News & other sources.

School shootings since 2013
Moms Demand Action

Creating a legal method to compel someone to temporarily surrender their guns if they're a danger to themselves or others is a common-sense way to prevent mass shootings and suicides, North Carolina Democratic legislators and gun-control advocates said Tuesday.

photo of an apple on top of books
Kate Ter Haar / Creative Commons

Former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer has given $20 million to College Advising Corps.

The Chapel Hill-based organization places advisers in high schools to help first-generation and underrepresented students navigate their way to college.

In this May 12, 2017, photo, registered nurse Samantha Marz checks a student at Rundle elementary school in Las Vegas.
John Locher / AP

North Carolina could get new standards for staffing school nurses, if a new proposal goes forward.

Delven Mearis of Durham Public Schools rallied as small crowd waited for busloads of teachers to arrive ahead of the march.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

As they packed up their protest signs and returned to the classroom to finish out the school year, thousands of teachers in North Carolina turned their attention to a different fight: The midterm elections.

Participants make their way towards the Legislative Building during a teachers rally at the General Assembly. Thousands of teachers rallied the state capital seeking a political showdown over wages and funding for public school classrooms.
Gerry Broome / AP

Thousands of North Carolina educators mounted a historic demonstration outside the state Capitol Wednesday as lawmakers arrived for the start of a short session. While the halls in many of the state's schools were quiet, the streets of downtown Raleigh thundered with voices of teachers and their supporters.

Supporters of raising pay for teachers began to march in downtown Raleigh on Wednesday morning.
James Morrison / WUNC

Thousands of North Carolina teachers march through the streets of Raleigh on Wednesday to call for higher pay and for more resources for their students. The march is part of the wave of educator-led activism across the nation in backlash to federal and state-level education budget cuts.

headshot of chancellor cummings
Courtesy of UNCP

Retired surgeon and former state Medicaid Director Robin Gary Cummings took office as chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke in 2015. Cummings is a Pembroke native and member of the Lumbee Tribe. His tenure has been marked by efforts to expand economic and educational opportunities for residents of Robeson County, which has one of the highest poverty rates in the country.

Educators filed into the General Assembly building Wednesday as lawmakers gaveled in the 2018 session
Rusty Jacobs / WUNC

Eight-year-old Chandler White, who struggles with dyslexia, attends The Piedmont School, a non-profit specializing in teaching students with learning disabilities.
Lynn Hey / For WUNC

Eight-year-old Chandler White is a bright-eyed, happy third grader, alternating Tae Kwon Do and spelling homework in his dining room with his mom.

He says he "really, really likes" his new school, The Piedmont School, a private school in High Point.

But, he used to hate going to school. It's the kind of thing a lot of kids say from time to time, but Chandler was really struggling, said his mom, Kara White.

Kitchen worker Nancy Martinez serves breakfast at an elementary cafeteria in Chandler, Arizona during a teacher strike there. North Carolina teachers are walking in AZ teachers' footsteps with protests this Wednesday.
Matt York / AP

A total of 38 school districts will be closed for classes Wednesday while thousands of teachers march to the Capitol to call for better school funding. Some schools will hold an optional workday, with limited operations. That means many hourly employees, like cafeteria workers or bus drivers, could miss out on a day of work.

A sign indicating a teacher work area inside a public school in Wake County.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

The recent wave of teacher activism sweeping through conservative, tax-cutting states has washed into North Carolina, where educators have pledged to fill the streets and bring their demands for better pay and school resources to legislators' doorstep.

classroom
Malate269 / Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 40 school districts in North Carolina will close schools on Wednesday, May 16. That is the opening day for the legislative session, and thousands of teachers from around the state plan to protest in Raleigh for better pay and working conditions. The demonstration comes as teachers strike and walk out in other states around the country, like Arizona, West Virginia, and Kentucky.

From left to right, Eddie, Natalie and Maria Fernanda Cortes, seated outside Mount Pisgah Academy, a private Seventh-Day Adventist academy near Asheville, where the two sisters will attend school in Fall 2018.
Courtesy of Heidy Cortes Gomez

It was Saturday morning, and that meant the Cortes family was at church. They are faithful Seventh-day Adventists. Eleven-year-old Eddie played the piano to start the service.

His father, Eddie Sr. sat in the first church pew, next to Mafer, 15, and Natalie, 13, who leaned on their mom, Heidy.

Third grade teachers, Brittney Dennis, left, and Sabrina Peacock.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Thousands of North Carolina teachers will attend a rally at the Capitol Wednesday. They will call on legislators to restore funding and initiatives for teachers and students that were eliminated in the past decade.  Brittney Dennis and Sabrina Peacock are two third-grade teachers at different stages of their careers.  The two sat down to talk about the many cuts they have seen through the years, and why they plan to march. 

Teachers walk in together as they arrive for work at San Marcos Elementary School Friday, May 4, 2018, in Chandler, Ariz., after a statewide teachers strike ended. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Matt York / AP

This Wednesday more than 10,000 teachers are expected in Raleigh on the General Assembly's opening day to demand better pay and working conditions.

Veteran educators say those demands are about restoring education funding to what it was before the recession hit and a wave of Republican-led policies and tax cuts dismantled their benefits.

Teachers have adopted the tagline: "It's Personal."

Students at Yadkin Valley Community School, a Montessori School in Elkin, crowd around school choice advocate Darrell Allison in celebration of National School Choice Week.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Darrell Allison is on the road again, taking a final long trip to visit private schools across North Carolina. He's used to traveling - to small towns, suburbs, down east and to the mountains to talk to parents and legislators across the state.

NC Legislature
W Edward Callis III

When legislators return to Raleigh next week for the start of the spring session, they will have a slew of ideas to consider to improve student safety in North Carolina schools. The House Select Committee on School Safety on Thursday approved a handful of recommendations to the General Assembly, and also drafted a number of possible bills.

High Point Stadium
Courtesy of Odell Associates, Inc.

High Point University has donated $22 million to go toward the city's downtown revitalization efforts. The plan centers around a sports arena, which broke ground last month. A professional baseball team plans to kick off its season next spring.

Lucero is finishing up the third grade at her school in Alamance County. It's a high-pressure year -- not just for her, but for her mom too.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Every day when Ismari Molina was pregnant with her first daughter, she saw what she calls “the big star” on her way home from work.

A sign indicates a no-student drop-off zone with Wake County public school buses in the background.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

More schools are canceling classes next Wednesday as teachers prepare for a rally at the legislature.

Orange County and Iredell-Statesville schools will join Wake, Durham, Chapel Hill-Carrboro, Guilford and Mecklenburg schools in closing on May 16.

Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

The State Board of Education has approved a contract to turn over operation of Southside-Ashpole Elementary to the charter school operator Achievement for All Children.

YouTube / Durham Public Schools

The Durham school board has voted 6 to 1 to close schools to students on May 16. That's the date of a planned teacher demonstration at the state legislature in support of increased public school funding.

A sign indicates a no-student drop-off zone with Wake County public school buses in the background.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

There could be more and better-trained, school-based police officers in North Carolina -- if the recommendations of a legislative committee are put into action.

Peter Hans, the newly elected president of the N.C. Community College System, delivers remarks while North Carolina Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger, from left, House Speaker Tim Moore and Gov. Roy Cooper listen during a news conference in Raleigh
Gerry Broome / AP

A Raleigh-based government relations expert has been chosen to lead North Carolina’s community college system. The last president resigned after a little more than a year on the job.

Cedar Fork Elementary in Wake County would have to add three more kindergarten classrooms under the class-size change scheduled to go into effect in the fall.
Jess Clark / WUNC

A legislative committee that may overhaul the way schools are funded is looking to rewrite the formula so it’s based primarily on a school district’s students.

Teacher in classroom with students.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/auPuAq

North Carolina teachers are expected to get a raise of $891 this year, on average, which would bump the state up two spots when compared to other states.

The Guilford County School board has declared a "special emergency" to deal with tornado damage at three of its schools.

High school and college students eager to respond to questions about gun safety issues from lawmakers.
Ben McKeown / WUNC

The Institute of Politics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held a "reverse" town hall on gun violence Sunday to give influential lawmakers the opportunity to ask young people what they thought about the issue.

East Chapel Hill High students Sahmoi Stout and Sydney McLean lead fellow students in a march for gun control as part of the National School Walkout, holding the banner that says "Enough."
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

About 200 students from several Chapel Hill area schools marched together up a hill, and nearly five miles across their town behind an orange banner that said "Enough."

Elizabeth Ferguson Hollifield, a teacher from Princeton W.Va., holds a sign as she walks to a teacher rally Monday, March 5, 2018.
Tyler Evert / AP

Teachers in Arizona are protesting for higher pay, while Kentucky educators rallied at their state capitol this Friday. The same day, Oklahoma teachers ended a 9-day walkout, rivaling the length of time West Virginia teachers left their classrooms last month. Distressed teachers seeking higher pay and better funding for education have created a movement in red states, leaving some to wonder, will North Carolina teachers join in next?

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