Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Korean Catholics in the Triangle will soon have a new place to worship.

For years, Korean Catholics like Whansu Kang have been gathering at the St. Michael’s church in Cary. That should change this fall when the first phase of the Saint Ha-Sang Paul Jung Catholic Church is expected to be completed. It will give members of the Korean Catholic community their own space. Kang says the new space will give Korean students and visitors to the Triangle a place to turn to:

Eric Hodge:  An audience at Wake Forest University was among the first to hear parts of Martin Luther King Junior’s “I Have a Dream” speech. King delivered the address 10 months before the historic speech in Washington, DC.   Inge reports.

On October 11, 1962 – Martin Luther King Junior spoke at Wait Chapel at Wake Forest University.

" This will be the day when all of God’s children, black men and white men…"

Pauli Murray mural in downtown Durham
Face Up Project, Center for Documentary Studie

There are murals of a woman in downtown Durham who was obscure to the population until just about a year ago. Her name is Pauli Murray. Murray was raised in Durham and went on to become a civil rights leader, co-founder of the National Organization for Women and the first African American woman to be ordained an Episcopal priest. Durham residents have been celebrating the 100th anniversary of Murray’s birth. There is a Pauli Murray Project at Duke University named for her and even a play in her honor. 

An eclectic mix of art pieces come together in Chapel Hill in the exhibition"Local Histories: The Ground We Walk On." Building on the idea that "place can not be global," more than 50 artists from across the United States created works about communities around the world. The exhibit includes artists’ perspectives on a UFO hunter in Puerto Rico, the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam, and Michael Jordan’s childhood home. Host Frank Stasio talks with Elin O'Hara Slavick, curator of the exhibition, and Cici Stevens, a local artist with a piece in the show.

Rigor Amortis

Feb 10, 2011

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching. If you’re not sure how to make a successful romantic gesture to the one you love, you might want to consult with a zombie. Sure, they eat brains, but they’re capable of love, too – a love that can last forever. Host Frank Stasio talks with writer Jaym Gates about a new collection of zombie short stories she co-edited called "Rigor Amortis" (Absolute XPress/2010) that deals with love from beyond the grave.

Jeannette Walls
http://blogs.guilford.edu/bryanseries/

Jeannette Walls' parents didn't seem to worry about her and her three siblings much. Not when Jeannette set herself on fire cooking a hot dog when she was a preschooler, not when the family had to repeatedly flee home after home with creditors at their heels, not when she rummaged through the school garbage to find her lunch. But in her best-selling memoir, "The Glass Castle" (Scribner/2005), Walls offers gratitude for the lessons she learned growing up and for her parents' gifts of love. The author joins host Frank Stasio to talk about her memories of a hard-knock childhood.

Writer Langston Hughes is famous for uplifting poems like "I, Too" and lyrical poetry like “A Dream Deferred,” but North Carolina State Assistant Professor of English Jason Miller says that hidden within Hughes' works are powerful statements about the practice of lynching. Host Frank Stasio talks to Miller about his new book, "Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture” (University Press of Florida/2011).

Book Cover: The Story of Forgetting
www.stefanmerrillblock.com

More than five million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, that number is expected to double, if not quadruple. Researchers are learning more about the progressive neurological disorder that affects memory and other functions of the brain, but there is still no treatment or cure. Writers have begun documenting the epidemic, creating fiction and nonfiction that renders the mysterious disease and how it uniquely changes the lives of patients and caregivers alike. The New York Times declared this writing a new genre, calling it "Alzheimer's Literature."

A new study made available today sheds light on the phenomenon of neighborhood segregation. Kyle Crowder, a sociology professor at UNC Chapel Hill, conducted the research along with two others:

"Despite all of the talk about progress towards equal opportunity for everyone in gaining access to neighborhoods, there’s still a lot of evidence that native-born blacks and native-born white householders tend to move away from neighborhoods that have high concentrations of immigrants."


Crowder says people of different races typically leave for different reasons.

Robert Plant
robertplant.com

A rock n' roll legend, former lead singer of Led Zeppelin Robert Plant has stayed busy as of late. His latest release is called "Band of Joy" and his current tour brought him through Raleigh recently. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Plant to talk about the new album. Click "Listen Now" to hear the interview.

A candlelight vigil and prayer for the people of Egypt will be held this evening in Raleigh. The Muslim American Public Affairs Council and several others groups are organizing the vigil. Moe El-Gamal is the chairman of the council and one of the leading organizers. He also led a demonstration at the legislative building earlier today.

The Civil War began 150 years ago. As part of a four year commemoration, the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is opening an exhibit today at Wilson Library. The display includes about one-hundred-sixty items that help tell the story of what happened in and around Chapel Hill and the University during the conflict. Susan Ballinger helped organize the collection. She says there are some very interesting documents to read:

lighthouse
National Park Service

The Bodie Island Lighthouse might not be lit anytime soon. The National Park Service received about 3 million dollars in 2009 to renovate the structure built in 1872. Mike Murray is Park Manager of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

"It makes sense to finish the work that’s been done. Repairs are 85% complete. But because we encountered unforeseen work in a very old structure that had never been renovated before, we don’t have the amount of funding needed to finish it."

Reynolds Price
Duke University

Reynolds Price has died. The prolific author and professor of English at Duke University passed away yesterday. He was 77 years old.

Reynolds Price had a motto. The man who wrote dozens of books, poems, essays, and plays and taught for six decades at his alma mater lived his life by words offered to him by a teacher at Oxford University more than 50 years ago.

Martin Luther King Jr.
UNC Librairies

Parades, speeches and community projects fill today’s agenda for many across the state on this Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday.

In Raleigh, the Martin Luther King Committee is busy with a prayer breakfast this morning.

And then around 11am, the 31st Annual Martin Luther King Holiday Memorial March.

Abigail Washburn
abigailwashburn.com

Singer, songwriter, and banjo player Abigail Washburn is out with a new solo album called "City of Refuge." She plays at Berkeley Cafe in Raleigh tomorrow tonight and will be on A Prairie Home Companion on Saturday.

Ralph Campbell Dies

Jan 12, 2011

Former State Auditor Ralph Campbell has died. He was the first African-American elected to a statewide executive office in North Carolina.

fireworks
firstnightraleigh.com

New Year's Eve festivities are scheduled to take place all across North Carolina beginning this afternoon and extending into the early morning hours. There's everything from a pickle drop in Mount Olive to a bluegrass concert at Garner's Historic Auditorium. In the state capitol, First Night Raleigh activities begin at 2pm with a series of events for kids including a parade.

WUNC Morning Edition host Eric Hodge talks with Back Porch Music hosts Freddy Jenkins and Keith Weston about some memorable music events of 2010.  Inspired by NPR's year-end music series.

Time For KWANZAA

Dec 27, 2010

Many folks are taking down their Christmas trees this week – but in some communities, celebrating continues with the African-inspired Kwanzaa.

Rockwell, `The Problem We All Live With,` 1963, oil on canvas, 36 x 58in., Illustration for Look, Jan. 14, 1964
Norman Rockwell Museum Collection, NRM. 1975.1, Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing, Niles, Ill.

American Chronicles – The Art of Norman Rockwell is currently on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art.  It has traveled the country since last Spring.  The exhibit includes some 40 original oil paintings – chronicling six decades of Rockwell’s work – and a complete set of more than 300 Saturday Evening Post covers.  Rockwell was meticulous in creating scenes of American life – whimsical and idyllic.  During the latter part of his life – he took his work out of New England and captured what was transforming the south – the Civil Rights movement.

Justin Townes Earle
myspace.com/justintownesearle

Singer-songwriter Justin Townes Earle has forged a sound that harkens back to another era. His albums are crisp and his live performances inspired. The latest album, "Harlem River Blues" is something of a love letter to New York City. WUNC's Eric Hodge sat down with Justin Townes Earle before he played Cat's Cradle Monday, December 13th, 2010.

Taste Of Place

Jun 23, 2010

Certain places are known for their indigenous foods. Vidalia, Ga. grows sweet onions. The banks of the Indian River in Florida produce outstanding citrus fruits. In some cases, governments go as far as to designate these special places with geographical indications. But what makes some geographical indications associated with certain foods and drink profitable for the farmers and producers in that area? N.C.

Chaka Khan! Chaka Khan! It’s a name that just rolls off your tongue.  The famous R & B and “funk” superstar has a voice that has mesmerized fans for decades with its range and flexibility.  And who can forget the feathers and the hair!   Chaka Khan takes the stage in Durham this weekend.

Don de Leaumont Plays Live In Studio

Nov 20, 2009
Don de Leaumont
dononthewb.com

Singer-songwriter Don de Leaumont’s music is part storytelling, part folksy warmth and insight. In October, he released his fifth solo album, called “Planes, Trains, Crickets and Central Air.” Now a resident of Atlanta, Georgia, Don returns to his longtime home of Chapel Hill for a gig at The Cave.

He joins host Frank Stasio in the studio to play some tunes and discuss how he broke his heavy metal addiction.

Picture of Russian Duo: Terry Boyarsky & Oleg Kruglyakov
russianduo.com

The balalaika is a traditional Russian instrument with three strings and a triangular body. Oleg Kruglyakov, a native of Omsk City, Siberia, has been playing the balalaika since he was seven years old. Now, he's devoted to educating other cultures about Russian folk music and testing the limits of his instrument by teaming up with pianist Terry Boyarsky.

Cassilhaus
Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly

A love of collecting photography led Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly to include an art gallery in their dream home. Then the couple decided that they wanted to do more than just display art. They wanted to build an in-home studio space for artists to create in. Cassilhaus, the name of Frank and Ellen's dwelling, fulfilled their dream. Now, invited artists from all over the world come to their home to write, paint, sculpt, dance or just generate ideas for upcoming projects.

Jewish-American Identity & Food

Mar 26, 2009

A lot of what we cook defines us. Say "barbecue and sweet tea" and people hear, "the South." The same is true for immigrants. As hyphenated Americans we are what we eat. This will be the subject of an upcoming lecture by Nora Rubel, an assistant professor of religion and classics at the University of Rochester in New York. Rubel earned her graduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and returns next week talk about "The Settlement Cookbook and the Transformation of Jewish-American Identity." But first she joins guest host Laura Leslie with a preview.

Joe Thompson At 90

Dec 9, 2008
David Persoff

Legendary North Carolina fiddler Joe Thompson turns 90-years-old today. He is widely recognized as being the last living link to a time when African American String Bands played for square dances nearly every weekend around here. Thompson's toured the world with his music and is still playing, but now mostly, at home with friends and neighbors.

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Holy Smoke

Nov 12, 2008

Most traditions have plenty of people, history and folklore to back them up. Carolina barbecue is no different. A new book called, "Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue" explores the Tar Heel tradition - past and present.

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