Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

photo of four men in the woodsy sculpture from duke gardens
Kevin Clark

For more than a decade, John Harrison was the frontman for the indie-rock band North Elementary. He has since left that gig to work solo, which he says gives him more flexibility and creative freedom. 

A picture of H.C. McEntire.
Heather Evans Smith / Merge Records

The new year marks a new chapter for Heather McEntire. The Durham-based singer of Mount Moriah has released her debut solo album. H.C. McEntire's new record is called Lionheart.  She said it's inspired by the American South and a desire to reclaim country music from the hetero-normative, homogenous schtick of tailgates and six-packs and men chasing women.

Forager Pascal Baudar wildcrafts plants, herbs and fungi from the wild, then uses them as ingredients to create food and beverages that he says express the true flavor of the environment. He is the author of two great books on the topic, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine and The Wildcrafting Brewer.

The path to become a Master Sommelier is not for the weak of will or unprepared of palate. The certification exam literally goes on for days and includes portions on theory, practical knowledge and tasting. Those taking the exam must be able to taste wine at random and be able to name the grape, the place it's from, and the year it was made.

Barton Seaver is an award-winning chef whose work now focuses on sustainability in the fish and seafood industries. He is the author of more than a half-dozen books including the essential American Seafood, a deep dive into the past, present and future of America's emotional and economic relationship with seafood.

Antibiotics and the future of Big Chicken

Mar 2, 2018

Maryn McKenna is a journalist who specializes in superbugs – bacteria that have evolved to survive antibiotics. Her book, Big Chicken, focuses on research involving the use of antibiotics in modern agriculture and how they changed the way the world eats. McKenna says the chicken industry is largely to blame for our enormous overuse of and exposure to antibiotics.

The Moth Spring Fundraiser 2018

Mar 1, 2018
Wendy Suzuki
Photo by Jason Falchook

Abhishek Shah has a job interview over lunch that turns terribly awkward.

Wendy Suzuki is moved to change the culture of her family when confronted with her father’s memory loss.

Vin Shambry goes to outdoor school and feels like a kid again.

Mary Kate O'Flanagan takes charge and responsibility at a funeral.

Sound Opinions: Film Soundtracks

Mar 1, 2018

A film's soundtrack can be as memorable as its visuals. So as awards season winds down, Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot pick some of their favorite film soundtracks. Plus, Jim and Greg review the soundtrack for the film Black Panther.

REVEAL Fundraiser Episode Spring 2018

Mar 1, 2018

For the 2018 Spring fundraising season, here are three of our favorite Reveal stories from the past year.

photo of Danai Gurira on top of a car holding a weapon
Marvel Studios-Disney via AP

There are not many superlatives left to describe the success of “Black Panther.” The latest Marvel movie has received glowing reviews, broken countless records, and is nothing short of a cultural phenomenon. It is also well on its way to surpassing $1 billion at the global box office. And although it has reached screens in far corners of the world, questions remain about what its long-term impact will be. Can one successful film finally disprove the longstanding myth that black films don’t travel?

Deja Nuke: Return of the Nuclear Threat

Mar 1, 2018

With the threat of nuclear war once again a part of the national conversation, Reveal looks at nuclear threats both foreign and domestic. The show takes listeners to Iran, and finds out what life is actually like inside North Korea. As the Trump Administration pushes for the biggest increase in spending on nuclear weapons since the Cold War, Reveal explores how nukes have changed. Instead of annihilation, think “flexible” nuclear weapons that can threaten “limited” nuclear war. That’s the idea anyway.

photo of elderly man, seated in a rocking chair
Joe Zakko

When film aficionados around the state tune in to the Oscars this Sunday, there are a couple North Carolina connections to look out for. “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” was filmed in and around Asheville and is up for several awards. Another connection is in the short film category — a North Carolinian directed one of the films nominated for best short.

The Stray Birds
Emilia Paré

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

Over the next few weeks, we'll feature artists from Yep Roc Records. The label, headquartered in Hillsborough, NC, continues to celebrate its 20th anniversary. We're commemorating by highlighting some of their artists.

This time, Eric Hodge chats with the members of The Stray Birds about their song "When I Die" from the 2016 album Magic Fire.

The beets go on: America's Test Kitchen reimagines beet salad

Feb 28, 2018

Beets just may be the king of vegetable world. No other vegetable gives you the same mix of sweetness and delicious earthiness as a good beet. But no matter how good they are, there is a limit to how many formulaic beet and goat cheese salads one can enjoy in life, right? To that effect, Managing Producer Sally Swift talked with Molly Birnbaum from America’s Test Kitchen about their great new take on the beet salad - Charred Beet Salad.

Neil Gaiman
Mark Arrigo

Neil Gaiman: Details his punk rock beginnings and how his wife finally got him to sing on stage again.
  Matt Day: Visits a famous cemetery in London and meets a homeless man who masquerades as a vampire.
  Bisi Alimi: Loses his best friend to AIDS and in his honor decides to speak out publicly about his own diagnosis.
  Christina Lamb: A war correspondent under fire in Afghanistan talks about dodging bullets and being a mother.

Throughout the history of movies and television, food has often been a central character and theme. Who could forget the escargots in Pretty Woman, Goodfellas’s prison dinner party meal of pasta and meatballs, the pastrami sandwich at Katz’s Delicatessen during “that scene” in When Harry Met Sally, or Buddy the Elf’s insane breakfast dessert pasta? Bringing those famous film dishes to your home dinner table has become an obsession for Andrea Rea.

Edward Hejka
Liz Mackinder

Dame Wilburn is told that she is cursed and decides to try and lift the curse herself.

Tina Zimmerman is on the cusp of empty-nest syndrome when an accident helps her decide that she wants to become a minister.

Eddie Hejka’s son Sammy is autistic and very determined to meet Oscar the Grouch.

Michelle Fecteau houses an enthusiastic history buff on a pilgrimage to learn more about the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire.

photo of Jennifer Pharr Davis on a big rock with a plaque
Maureen Robinson

Hiking through fields and forests has been life changing for Jennifer Pharr Davis. She is a professional hiker and adventurer. At just 21 years old, she set off on a solo hike across the entire Appalachian Trail, a path that covers 14 states and more than 2,000 miles.

photo of carlota santana dancing
Flamenco Vivo

Nobody knows exactly how flamenco, a unique type of performance art, got its name. It emerged from Andalucia, Spain but has cultural ties to many ethnic groups including Indian gypsies, Arabs and Sephardic Jews. Although much of flamenco’s history is shrouded in mystery, one thing is certain: there is nothing quite like it. 

Winston-Salem native Caleb Caudle
Courtesy of Maria Ivey

Winston-Salem native Caleb Caudle recorded his new collection Crushed Coins in Los Angeles. The record reflects a tightly knit group of musicians and a fertile period of song-writing. Caudle has been compared to Jason Isbel and lauded in Rolling Stone magazine and on NPR.  

Crushed Coins is released today, Caleb is playing at the Cat's Cradle Back Room Saturday night.

JULIENNE ALEXANDER / CRIMINAL

Just what type of material is protected under the First Amendment?  And can a book be held responsible for a murder?  That is the question in this week's Criminal podcast. 

Criminal is recorded at WUNC.

Chef James Syhabout: living between culinary worlds

Feb 23, 2018

Chef James Syhabout is a first-generation Asian-American whose family came to the Bay Area from a Lao refugee camp in Thailand in the early 1980s. He grew up working in his mother’s Thai restaurant before going on to a successful career as a chef specializing in fine dining. However, when his mother gave up her restaurant to return to her homeland, James came face-to-face with deep personal regret of not having learned more about the food of his people.

People involved in the 1960s and 1970s counterculture movement stood up to protest what they considered the moving forces behind the industralization of corporate food manufacturing. Their food-centric forms of civil disobedience resulted in the popularization of many foods we still eat today: granola, tofu, soymilk, and maybe even the toast you had this morning. Their food movement is the topic of the book Hippie Food by Jonathan Kauffman.

Understanding why we eat what we eat

Feb 23, 2018

How we eat says a lot about us. How we say we eat also says a lot about us. Rachel Herz is a psychologist and neuroscientist who teaches at Brown University and Boston College. She has written a book called Why You eat What You Eat: The Science Behind Our Relationship with Food, a fascinating read about the psychology of our food choices. And a lot of what she's found is probably not what most people would expect.

My Town, Chi-Town

Feb 23, 2018

Chicago is experiencing a reversal of the great migration that propelled African Americans northward in search of opportunity. In this century, a quarter-million black Chicagoans have moved away. The reasons include decades of bad policy and broken promises on affordable housing, education and public safety.

Sound Opinions: Don Was

Feb 22, 2018

Don Was is a bassist in the band Was (Not Was), a successful music producer for artists like The Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan, and the president of legendary jazz label Blue Note Records. This week, Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot pick the brain of the multi-talented Don Was about his influences, what he looks for in an artist and what he loves about music. Plus, Jim and Greg review new albums from indie rock band Superchunk and rapper Dessa.

photo of Rabbi Rami Shapiro
Courtesy or Rabbi Rami Shapiro

Rabbi Rami Shapiro is a spiritual scholar who believes the teachings of the perennial wisdom philosophy are the key to encountering the divine in a chaotic and divided society. The philosophy takes wisdom from spiritual leaders across different doctrines and finds the common truths in their message. 

photo of book cover for 'appointed rounds' picturing an umbrella
Mercer University Press

With 11 poetry books under his belt, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Michael McFee is no stranger to the written word. But there are some concepts too wide to grasp in lines and stanzas.

20TH CENTURY FOX | DIGITALSPY.COM

Enough with the damsels in distress. For the next installment of Movies On The Radio, we're looking for ladies who pushed the boundaries of what it means to be a woman on the big screen. We're talking smart, strong, three-dimensional characters who can save themselves, thank you very much.

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past few years, you know about the Instant Pot® revolution. Maybe you're a part of the nation of self-proclaimed "Instant Potheads" or one of the nearly 1.3 million member in the Instant Pot® Community Facebook page. However, it's not the only multicooker -- or combination slow cooker/electric pressure cooker -- on the market.

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