Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Courtesy of The Artist

Durham-based musician Kamara Thomas knew she wanted to be an artist at a young age. But she grew up in a Christian fundamentalist household that frowned upon artistic expression.

James Elkington – ‘Wading the Vapors’

May 12, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Sound Opinions: Fictional Bands

May 11, 2017

Some bands are are born, and some are just made up. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of their favorite fictional bands from movies, TV, and more. Plus, a review of the new album from cartoon creation Gorillaz, and the strange story of C.W. McCall's trucker hit "Convoy."

Standing Rock and beyond

May 11, 2017

The oil protests at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation drew national attention. On Reveal, we team up with Inside Energy to go behind the scenes and meet the young people who started the fight. This upcoming hour looks at how those protests put at-risk teens on a healthier path and how other Native tribes are grappling with energy projects on their sovereign land.

arianta / Flickr

A well-executed remake film can bring a beloved story to a fresh audience. But when a remake is done wrong, it can leave faithful viewers cringing.

For the next Movies On The Radio, The State of Things wants to know what are the best and worst remake films? 

Front Country band
Big Hassle

Grab your picnic blanket and round up the kids because it's time for the start of Back Porch Music on The Lawn at American Tobacco in Durham.

Thursday night Front Country rolls into town with their genre-busting brand of roots music.  This is the first of eight in a series of concerts. 

Courtesy Monica Berra/ Soul City

Like many utopian societies, Soul City was a dream that was doomed to fail. It was the brainchild of civil rights leader Floyd McKissick who wanted to build a haven of racial equality for nearly 20,000 people. Construction for the project began in the Piedmont region of North Carolina in the 1970s, but constant bureaucratic battles led to its demise.

Durham, Bull, Blind, Art
Leoneda Inge

There is a new arts program underway in Durham that seeks to make sure everybody gets the chance to enjoy the city’'s growing array of downtown public art – whether they can see or not. And these art descriptions are now just a phone call away.

May 9, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Live | Participate | Stations

Coming June 23 via podcast, broadcast and possibly a volcano near you.

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Lopez, Kristina

Brendan and Rico will host a listening party and unveil an original treat for the ears, playing an hour of audio that celebrates the wonder of the night skies and how nature has the ability to restore our creativity.

The evening will include live appearances from our intrepid hosts, an al fresco barbecue, and an audio program including conversations with Neil deGrasse Tyson, Feist, Fleet Foxes and more TBA.

University of South Carolina Press

Theories abound regarding why famed writer Ernest Hemingway shot and killed himself in Idaho in 1961. Some claim he suffered from bipolar disorder or that he had depression. But in the new book “Hemingway’s Brain” (University of South Carolina Press/2017), psychiatrist Andrew Farah offers a new theory.

Gate City Divas / www.gatecitydivas.com

The Gate City Divas are a female-led blues group made up of seasoned singer-songwriters from the Triad. The group had an unconventional start; they were awarded a grant to record an album of original songs by Greensboro-based female performers. After completing the project and releasing the album “Goin’ To Town,” they decided to form a full-fledged band.

Replicas of the Nina and Pinta, used by Christopher Columbus to sail across the Atlantic Ocean, will dock at Wilmington.
The Columbus Foundation

Replicas of two of Christopher Columbus' ships are scheduled to dock at a North Carolina port.

Samuel Lewis Lee
Jason Falchook

Ophira Eisenberg confronts her fertility during a crisis.
  Terry Wolfisch Cole wants preferential treatment as the oldest sister.
  Andy Christie sends off his mother with a melody.
  Samuel Lewis Lee is looked after by a mother's love.

Michael Zirkle

Loud drum beats and trumpet calls are prominent features of many war-themed musical works. They symbolize the disruption and angst present in times of conflict. On the other hand, lyrical melodies and poetic vocals are also commonly used to evoke themes of reconciliation and hope. The North Carolina Master Chorale brings this range of sounds to the stage Friday, May 12 in a special performance entitled “War and Peace.

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Douglas, Emerald

Critics have praised Joan Shelley’s poetic lyrics and minimalist approach to Appalachian folk music. She caught the attention of Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, who produced her latest album. Here she is to set the vibe for an al fresco gathering.

Roger Miller – “My Uncle Used to Love But She Died”

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time, Eric Hodge sits down with Chapel Hill's Mipso to discuss their song "Water Runs Red" from the album Coming Down The Mountain.

What cops aren't learning

May 4, 2017

Some police departments are embracing a set of tactics designed to reduce the use of force – and prevent police shootings. Rather than rushing in aggressively, officers back off, wait out people in crisis and use words instead of weapons. But this training isn't required in most states. Reveal teams up with APM Reports and finds that most cops spend a lot more time training to shoot their guns than learning how to avoid firing them.

Sound Opinions: Velvet Underground at 50

May 4, 2017

The 1967 debut from The Velvet Underground didn't sell many records, but arguably no album in the past half century has had a greater influence on rock music. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot offer a Classic Album Dissection of The Velvet Underground & Nico in celebration of the art-rock classic's fiftieth anniversary.

Courtesy of Kathryn Clarke

Holidays like Mother’s Day are often marked by cards, bouquets, or a heartfelt gift. But for the past three years, local writers have been gathering together to celebrate the occasion through storytelling. “Listen To Your Mother” features live readings about every aspect of motherhood, from the messy to the mundane.

Sarah Sneeden / Viking/Penguin Publishing

For nearly 20 years, Ann B. Ross has written about the lives of the outspoken Miss Julia and her band of friends. They live in the fictional town of Abbotsville.

The newest novel in the Miss Julia mystery series takes the book’s heroine to the coast where a hurricane bring both chaos and surprising treasures. Ross lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina, and her town has provided endless inspiration for the characters and content of her work.

David Hoffman

Earl Scruggs is considered one of the most influential banjo players of all time. He made a name for himself performing with Bill Monroe’s band on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry in the mid-1940s. Scruggs went on to compose seminal records like “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” and “The Ballad of Jed Clampett.”

Phillip Lewis

In the novel “The Barrowfields” (Hogarth/2017) a character named Henry grows up revering his literary father, a man who ensconced the family in a strange house on a hillside in western North Carolina. But his father’s dark unraveling pushes Henry away.

He abandons the sister and mother he had promised to protect and vows to stay away from his gloomy mountain hometown forever. But the ties of family and home prove stronger than Henry’s will to escape them both.

McGuire's Miracle The Documentary

Alexander Julian is credited with the iconic revamp of Tar Heel sports uniforms. But his journey to creating the legendary Carolina blue argyle was a long time in the making. Julian drew up his first designs when he was a child, and he started working the sales floor at his father Maurice Julian’s haberdashery when he was in his teens.

The Prime Rib Renaissance

Apr 28, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

This week, Rico had the tough assignment of eating freshly carved prime rib in Beverly Hills. (The struggle is real, folks.) But he did have a good reason: Prime rib, that staple cut of beef favored by many a mid-century restaurant, is enjoying a comeback. It’s been showing up on menus in trendy eateries in New York City and elsewhere.

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Lopez, Kristina

John Ridley is one of the busiest guys in Hollywood. After winning an Oscar for writing the film “12 Years a Slave,” he created the award-winning series “American Crime” and the new Showtime miniseries “Guerrilla.”

Charlamagne Tha God Explains ‘Black Privilege’

Apr 28, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Millions of listeners tune in to hear Charlamagne co-host the nationally syndicated radio show “The Breakfast Club.” It’s considered one of the most important shows in the hip-hop world. He’s known for his long, sometimes combative interviews with everyone from Kanye West to Hillary Clinton.


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Douglas, Emerald

Each week, our listeners send in their questions about how to behave, and answering them this time around is Charlamagne Tha God. He is an outspoken giant of terrestrial radio, co-hosting the morning show “The Breakfast Club,” which is syndicated by iHeartRadio. He’s also got an MTV2 show.

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