Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Eno Publishers

A long wait for grape pie, the intricacies of hard crab stew, and a good life for a pig named Crisco are some of the stories in the new book "The Carolina Table" (Eno Publishers/2016).

An image of actor Emily Anderson in 'Orlando'
Alex Maness

In 1928, writer Virginia Woolf portrayed the story of an Elizabethan nobleman in her novel “Orlando: A Biography.” The story follows Orlando as he becomes a woman and travels through time. Orlando’s journey takes on a 21st-century spin in the stage adaptation by Sarah Ruhl. Durham-based theater group The Delta Boys have brought Ruhl’s adaptation to Manbites Dog Theater.

Chinyere Amanze, Matthew King, Steven Petrow, Rebecca Martinez at The Civilist Live Show at Motorco Music Hall.
Courtesy of Dean Fitzgerald

Steven and his guest experts take questions from listeners and audience members at a live show in Durham, North Carolina. Of course, that's the hometown of his alma mater Duke University.

An image of the book cover for 'Dancing in Damascus'
Routledge

In March 2011, many Syrians stood up in the midst of the Arab Spring to protest President Bashar al-Assad and demand the country’s leader step down. Since then, a tumultuous civil war has ensued between the government, its citizens and rebel extremists.

Courtesy Sheryl Oring

In the lead up to the inauguration, Sheryl Oring, art professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, roamed the country asking people to dictate postcards to the new president. The postcards show a range of support, emotion, and frustration regarding the incoming administration.
 

Danielle Ofri has a crisis of confidence while working the night-shift at Bellvue.
Isobel Connelly discovers she has a heart condition at age six.
David Newell gets a job as Mr. McFeely on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.
Steve Zimmer flirts with a woman while at the supermarket.

Helen Cooper spends a special birthday at Coney Island. 

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Lopez, Kristina

Brit Marling first attracted some attention when two movies she co-wrote and starred in premiered at Sundance in the same year. Those films, “Sound of My Voice” and “Another Earth,” were widely acclaimed by critics and they both explored metaphysical themes. We talked with her about “Another Earth” back in 2011.

Cristela Alonzo Finds the Funny in her Family

Jan 20, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Comedian Cristela Alonzo grew up in south Texas and got her start performing stand up in Dallas. Then she struggled for years in the L.A. comedy scene before becoming the first Latina to write and star in her own TV show. It was called “Cristela” and it aired on ABC. Her new comedy special launches this Tuesday on Netflix, it’s called “Lower Classy.” She talks about the special and how her family had a major influence on her jokes. (Find her advice for the proper way to dine on pan dulce here.

Cristela Alonzo Gives Us Some ‘Lower Classy’ Advice

Jan 20, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

After chatting with us about her upcoming Netflix comedy special and explaining the story of why the sight of Girl Scouts struck fear into her mother’s heart, the comedian stuck around to answer our few of our listeners’ etiquette questions… and offers us a new business opportunity.

The proper way to dine on pan dulce

Aravind Adiga Gives Us a New Definition of ‘Century’

Jan 20, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

One time financial reporter Aravind Adiga won the Booker Prize for his debut novel, 2008’s “The White Tiger.” He was the fourth Indian-born writer ever to do so.

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Lopez, Kristina

The History Lesson

By some accounts, the first woman to graduate from an American med school only got there by accident.

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Lopez, Kristina

NFL star Steve Gleason was a safety for the New Orleans Saints. And he became a hero after blocking a punt in the team’s first home game after Hurricane Katrina. But not long after retiring from the NFL, he was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

A drawing of Ellen Craft in disguise.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

This week's Criminal podcast tells a love story. Host Phoebe Judge talks with University of Georgia English Professor and author Barbara McCaskill about Ellen and William Craft. The couple was born into slavery, and they make a daring escape in hopes of having a proper wedding.

Sound Opinions Show

Jan 19, 2017

SOUND OPINIONS WEEKLY RUNDOWN, 01/20/2017, SO_0012017

ANNOUNCER COPY: Coming up…Jim and Greg review some new albums from UK electronic act The xx and psych rock mainstays The Flaming Lips. Plus, they talk  with The Album Leaf, a band that builds a cinematic sound based on electronics while retaining an organic warmth.


PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:


ALBUM REVIEW:


Jim and Greg review the new release from the English electronic band The xx. I See You is the group’s third album.

Courtesy of Janet Link

Portraiture as an artistic expression has been around for more than 2,000 years. In ancient Egypt, individuals painted portrait-style images of pharaohs in temples and palaces. During the Renaissance, artists sat down with others in their social and intellectual circles to make portraits. A new exhibit "REGARD" on view at Meredith College looks at modern portraiture through the work of 15 pairs of artists who made reciprocal portraits.

Alexandra Valenti

In 2015, folk singer and songwriter Tift Merritt was busy as a touring musician. At the time she had spent years on the road, was approaching 40 years old and was getting a divorce so she decided to take a year off from touring. During that time she processed her role as a writer and individual. Out of that reflection came her latest album, “Stitch of the World.”

This week, Reveal revisits the story of a woman who decides to confront the man she says abused her decades earlier. Reporter Tennessee Watson was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.

An image of Tracee Ellis Ross, Anthony Anderson and Kenya Barris
Richard Shotwell / AP Photo

As Donald Trump’s inauguration draws closer, popular culture wrestles the influence of the president-elect. In its latest episode, ‘Lemons,’ the ABC television show ‘Black-ish’ grappled with post-election grief and what the impending presidency might mean for communities of color.

 

 

 

 

Host Frank Stasio talked with popular culture experts Mark Anthony Neal and Natalie Bullock Brown about the program and how it compares to political commentary in other television shows.

A picture of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Dick DeMarsico / Wikimedia Commons

Martin Luther King Jr. is an inimitable cultural icon known for his vast contributions to the advancement of civil rights in the United States. A new play features an intimate portrait of the civil rights figure by putting his inner concerns and vulnerabilities on display.

Courtesy of Nancy Peacock

"I’ve been to hangings before, but never my own” is a line that came to author Nancy Peacock one day while she was on an early-morning walk.

Greensboro Science Center
Greensboro Science Center

The zoo at the Greensboro Science Center will double in size to make room for more endangered species habitats.

Andrew Solomon flourishes in the glamour of the Metropolitan Museum.

Greg Audel discovers a different way to live during a night spent with his friend's family. 

Linda Gregory worries she isn't good enough to be accepted by her boyfriend's family.

Hilda Chazanovitz faces resistance as she tries to move her mother into a nursing home.

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Lopez, Kristina

Brendan Francis Newnam: Back in the ’70s, Steve Jones and his band, Sex Pistols, lasted all of three years and put out a single album, but they helped turn punk from a fringe musical movement to a snarling, international phenomena and gave misfits everywhere anthems like, “Anarchy in the U.K.”

Ava DuVernay Unpacks the Issues at Play in ’13th’

Jan 13, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

In 2012, Ava DuVernay became the first African-American to win Best Director at Sundance and in 2014, she earned raves for her civil rights drama “Selma,” which was up for an Oscar for Best Picture. (Be sure to check out our chat with the film’s star David Oyelowo.)

The Little Green Pig Theatrical Concern and the LGBTQ Center of Durham join forces for the second year in a row for a fundraiser cabaret show. This year’s show is set in a dystopian near-future where a fictional character named Zee must fight for sex-positive liberation from the tyranny of an evil empire.
 

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