Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

The Big Oops: Blunders Large and Small

Jun 30, 2017
Hasan Minhaj
Photo by Christian Leonard

Jessica Lee Williamson works on a routine for her school talent show.

Hasan Minhaj misses his mom when she moves back to India to attend school.

Holly Rutter does some late night grocery shopping.

Bob Zellner is curious about a movement rising in Montgomery, Alabama in the early 1960's. 

Wines for Grilling

Jun 30, 2017

We often think of grabbing a beer when pulling those hamburgers and brats off the grill. However, wine can be a refreshing and beautiful pair to grilled foods. See the video above for quick tips on wine pairings.  Ray Isle, Executive Wine Editor at Food & Wine Magazine, has additional suggestions below, even some for potato chips!

Cover of Hope Larson's new book, 'Knife's Edge.'
Farrar, Straus & Giroux/2017

Twin siblings Alexander and Cleopatra are back on another big adventure. In the graphic novel “Knife’s Edge” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux/2017) the duo pair up to find a hidden treasure they believe is rightfully theirs. But their voyage to track the prize reveals new mysteries about their family and its potentially nefarious past. 

Ted Alexandro
Eric Korenman

Coming up as a comedian in New York City, Ted Alexandro has long appreciated the city’s diverse comic scene. On any given night, he says you can see acts ranging from comic newbies to veteran comedians like Chris Rock who are trying out new material in underground clubs. 

Farming while black

Jun 29, 2017

In 1996, Eddie Wise, the son of a sharecropper, purchased a farm with a loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Twenty years later, the USDA foreclosed on the property and evicted him. Reveal investigates his claim that he was discriminated against because of his race.

Sound Opinions: World Tour New Zealand

Jun 28, 2017

The Sound Opinions World Tour rolls along, making its next stop in beautiful New Zealand. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot take a virtual trip to the other side of the world to explore the best of kiwi music, focusing on the influential jangly pop movement known as the Dunedin Sound. Plus, they review the sophomore album from New Zealand's biggest pop star, Lorde.

Live from the World Science Festival

Jun 28, 2017
Michael Massimino
Jason Falchook

Mike Massimino must take to swimming before he can take off to outer space.

George Church tests his own strength of will as a human-guinea pig for science.

Sylvia Earle explores the ocean's depths as a pioneering aquanaut.

Chance The Rapper accepts the humanitarian award at the BET Awards at the Microsoft Theater on Sunday, June 25, 2017, in Los Angeles.
Matt Sayles/Invision / AP - 2017

Earlier this week, the BET Awards recognized some of the best in black entertainment. At the awards, Chicago-based artist and activist Chance the Rapper delivered a stirring speech after receiving the BET Humanitarian Award. Chance the Rapper was praised for recently donating $1 million to Chicago Public Schools. 

Movies On The Radio: Vacation Time

Jun 28, 2017
Reza Vaziri/Flickr-Creative Commons

Pack your bags people. It’s summer, and you know what that means: Vacation time! 

 Do you vicariously sip sangria through watching Woody Allen’s “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” or  practice your moves along with Baby in “Dirty Dancing?” Do you re-live the dog days of summers past with the gang in “The Sandlot?” 

 Maybe nothing reminds you of how good you have it now like cringing over the Griswalds’ family road trip to Wally World. 

John Paul White
Allister Ann / Sacks and Co.

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time Eric Hodge sits down with John Paul White to talk about his song "What's So" from the album Beulah.

Icy waterside
Belinda Novika Follow / Flickr - Creative Commons

A range of national and international events in the past decade have thrust conversations about race into the forefront of public consciousness. And with these conversations come questions about terminology like ‘whiteness’ and ‘blackness’. What is ‘whiteness,’ where did the idea of a ‘white race’ come from, and how has that idea changed over time? These are questions explored in “Seeing White,” a miniseries that is part of the podcast “Scene On Radio,” produced at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.  

An image of the gospel singer Mary D. Williams
Charlie Shelton-Ormond / WUNC

When Mary D. Williams was a kid growing up in Garner, North Carolina, she often visited her grandparents in Johnston County. She remembers passing a sign that said, “You are in the heart of Klan country” along the way. The sign was a visible example of the racism her grandparents endured in rural North Carolina.

Picture of Margaret Maron
Bob Witchger / Margart Maron

In 1981, Margaret Maron published a mystery novel about NYPD homicide detective Sigrid Harald and her investigation of a poisoning. More than 35 years and 31 titles later, Maron felt she had one more story to tell before retiring from novel writing.


Loamlands

Kym Register and Will Hackney are Loamlands, a folk-rock band whose often dark lyrics focus on local stories like urban development in Durham and overlooked queer history. The title track off their newest album, “Sweet High Rise,” is a direct reflection on watching the One City Center on Main Street in Durham climbs upward, forever changing the city skyline. Register’s thoughtful lyrics are supported and sometimes played off against contrasting layers of Hackney’s arrangements.


Your Customizable ‘Look Up and Listen!’ Invitation

Jun 23, 2017

Instructions: Copy and paste everything below the dotted line into an email to your invitees. Then customize the text, hit send, and party!

—–

Guess what! You’re invited to an outdoor listening party for one of my favorite podcasts, The Dinner Party Download! Come enjoy food, drinks, activities and an auditory tour of nature and the night sky with Neil deGrasse Tyson, the Fleet Foxes, Feist and more!

Look-Up-And-Listen_listening_kit.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

While you set out on your own journey into nature to hear our “Look Up and Listen!” audio adventure, we want to make sure that you’re not lacking in inspiration!

Test

Jun 22, 2017

Trial and terror

Jun 22, 2017

President Donald Trump has used the threat of foreign-born terrorists to justify his travel ban – but since 9/11, nearly every terrorist attack in the United States has come from within. On this episode of Reveal, we investigate which domestic terror episodes get tracked and why.

Sound Opinions: Best of 2017...So Far

Jun 22, 2017

There are still six months of 2017 left, but there are already lots of contenders for album of the year. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of their favorites of the year...so far. Plus, we hear picks from Sound Opinions listeners. 

Cover of 'Bohemian South: Creating Countercultures, from Poe to Punk.'
UNC Press

When it comes to bohemian art scenes and creative subcultures, the South has often been overshadowed – or sometimes even dismissed – in favor of metropolitan areas like New York or San Francisco. But a new book seeks to highlight the creative thinkers and diverse art scenes that influenced culture in the South, as well as those that permeated into the art, literary, and food scenes in northern states.


Cover of 'The Whole Way Home' by Sarah Creech
William Morrow/2017 / William Morrow/2017

Over the years, country music has seen iconic women like Patsy Cline, Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn become legends in the Country Music Hall of Fame. Nevertheless, country music remains a boy’s club for many artists. In her new novel “The Whole Way Home” (William Morrow/2017), writer Sarah Creech tells the story of one woman’s road to country music stardom.


Fleet Foxes

It's been six years since the last release from Fleet Foxes.  The Seattle-based band's first two records met with critical and commercial success, selling more than 2-million copies and winding up on many a critic's best of list.  The music found a home with a large and loyal fan base, but more than half-a-decade is a long wait. 

 Gal Gadot arrives at the world premiere of "Wonder Woman" in Los Angeles.
Jordan Strauss/Invision / AP - 2017

Superheroes have captured the American imagination since the 1930s. Characters including Superman, Batman and Spiderman represented men of strength and moral fiber who inspired as they fought the forces of evil. It was an easy jump to the silver screen, where today, multiple superhero films are released every year, blowing up box office records as often as they do the bad guys.


Motherlove, Money, and War

Jun 21, 2017
Jamaica Kincaid

Josh Axelrad has already lost many thousands of dollars gambling, but can’t resist stopping at a small casino.

Jamaica Kincaid longs for her mother’s love in Antigua.

Sebastian Junger reports on war in Afghanistan but only comprehends its full darkness after a profound personal loss.  
NOTE: When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description. 

Cover of 'Be Free Or Die,' written by Cate Lineberry
St. Martin's Press - 2017 / St. Martin's Press - 2017

 In May 1862, Robert Smalls became a Union hero overnight when he stole a Confederate steamer from the Charleston harbor. Smalls had been enslaved his whole life and decided to free himself and his family by stealing the Planter and piloting it to the Union fleet outside Charleston, South Carolina. 


Brett Williams as Kate Monster and Aaron Boles as Princeton
Areon Mobasher​ / Avenue Q

“Everyone’s a little bit racist,” according to the characters in the musical “Avenue Q.” The humorous show stars humans and puppets who are grappling with the realities of being imperfect adults in an imperfect world. It involves drinking, harsh language and nude puppets. Raleigh Little Theatre brings the show to the stage with a performance featuring a local cast and original puppets. 

Artist Kate Rhudy
Kendall Bailey / Kate Rhudy

Raleigh-based singer-songwriter Kate Rhudy picked up a violin when she was just a kid. She spent her childhood at fiddler’s conventions and regularly played folk music at home with her family. Now she has channeled her reflections on relationships, romance, and life on the road in her debut album “Rock N’ Roll Ain’t For Me.” 

Chatham County Line
Patrick Shanahan / Yep Roc Music Group

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode Eric Hodge talks with John Teer and Dave Wilson of Chatham County Line about their song 'Moving Pictures Of My Mind' from the album Autumn.

Speaking about the song, Dave Wilson says he was trying to connect the classic old movie sound to the modern experience.

Listen to the episode here:

Sound Opinions: Musical Road Trip

Jun 15, 2017

ANNOUNCER COPY:

Coming up on Sound Opinions...Jim and Greg take you on a musical road trip, playing songs about American cities and states, from the bustling streets of New York City to the beaches of California. Later, they’ll review the final album from rock and roll legend Chuck Berry.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

FEATURE:

America's ring of fire

Jun 14, 2017

Last fall, Reveal reporters found that wildfires were spreading to new parts of the country, and to more densely populated areas. Now, we revisit that hour with a new story about Kansas, a state that’s battling not only wildfires, but also significant underfunding of its forest firefighter team.

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