Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

“I Am: Heath Ledger” Giveaway

Apr 27, 2017
I-AM-HEATH-photo.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

This week, five (5) winners will receive two (2) tickets to a Fathom Events screening of “I Am: Heath Ledger.” (Retail value is $14-$15 per ticket). This movie is playing in select theaters in the US on Wednesday, May 3, 2017 only. See the list of participating theaters here. Each winner will be asked when notified to select a showing from the list of participating theaters. Tickets will be sent to winners via email.

Sound Opinions: Guitar Riffs

Apr 27, 2017

Perhaps the most essential element of rock ‘n’ roll is a great guitar riff. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of their favorite guitar licks of all time.

Courtesy of Karen Ziegler

LGBTQ individuals have long been pushed out of religious and spiritual communities, but that has not made all of them lose their faith. In fact, many LGBTQ folks have taken on leadership roles to advocate for and heal their communities. 

All-Star Comedy Team Creates Middle-Grade Comic Novel

Apr 27, 2017

When a comedian, a cartoonist and an author team up to write young adult fiction, it leads to a hilarious book about a sixth-grader with a secret.

Running from cops

Apr 27, 2017

In cities across America, black men are on the run. On April 4, 2015, in South Carolina, Walter Scott was killed while running away from a police officer. Eight days later, Freddie Gray ran from police in Baltimore. He was caught and later died in custody. On this episode of Reveal, we explore the consequences of fleeing from the police through two stories, both set in Baltimore.

Barry Lam / hiphination.org

 When professor Barry Lam needed a break from the college classroom, he set out to turn his scholarly passion into a podcast. “Hi-Phi Nation” uses investigative journalism and narrative storytelling to peer inside under-explored philosophical question.

Thomas Middleditch Shows Off His Nerd Range

Apr 21, 2017
Thomas-Middleditch-dpd-interview-420.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Improviser, actor, and all-around funny fellow Thomas Middleditch has earned an Emmy nomination for playing Richard Hendricks, the hero of the HBO comedy series “Silicon Valley.” The character is a shy computer genius who invents the greatest data compressor ever… but in the weird, cutthroat world of Silicon Valley can’t quite seem to earn the billions he deserves for it.


Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing

In his latest novel, “The Moon and The Other” (Simon & Schuster/2017), science fiction writer John Kessel envisions a collection of people living on the moon in the middle of the 22nd century. The story follows four main characters as they navigate the social structures of each colony, including the “Society of Cousins,” where men receive societal privileges but are denied the right to vote.

 

Courtesy North Carolina Opera

Georges Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” is an opera that pits the dynamics of a love triangle against the union of brotherhood. The opera, set in historic Sri Lanka, then Ceylon, features one of the most famous duets in opera history. The North Carolina Opera presents their interpretation of “The Pearl Fishers,” an opera that was only popularized long after Bizet’s death.

Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Louisiana governor Huey P. Long is a legendary character in his state's history. This week's Criminal Podcast looks at the mysterious death of Governor Long, a controversial character with a big persona.

Sounds Opinions: Drive-By Truckers

Apr 20, 2017

Drive-By Truckers have tackled politics and social issues in their music for decades, but never more strongly than on their latest album, American Band. Members Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood join Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot to talk about the record and perform acoustically in front of an audience. Plus, reviews of the new record from rapper Kendrick Lamar and the Danger Mouse-produced album inspired by The Man in the High Castle.

Friday night at the Carolina Theatre in Durham, the Cat's Cradle presents the North Carolina premiere of the concert film "Thank You, Friends." The movie's name comes from a Big Star song from Third (the band's third album). The movie documents an on-going, star-studded tribute to the band.

Nina Honeycutt and Elizabeth Anderson

 Social workers are often embedded with populations who are ignored and marginalized. A group of social work students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wanted to break down the divide and find a way to introduce some of these individuals to the wider community. They collected personal testimonies from 18 individuals from all walks of life with the hope that these narratives will increase awareness and compassion for those who are often silenced. 

Dom (left) and Jerron backstage at a Tribute to LeadBelly at Carnegie Hall in February 2016
Vania Kindard

The young folk musician Jerron Paxton defies easy categorization.  He grew up in a west coast metropolis, but his family and community adhered to customs from the rural south. And, like a number of people in Los Angeles with Louisiana roots, he inherited a combination of African-American, American Indian, and Jewish heritage. Paxton plays acoustic music that reflects these origins, with a focus on solo fiddle, guitar, and banjo. He also has a passion for telling his family’s story: 

Michael O'Brien

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

This time, Eric Hodge sits down with Jody Stephens of Big Star to discuss the band's classic song 'September Gurls.'

Russia's new scapegoats

Apr 19, 2017

Reveal exposes what it's really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. We trace the roots of the anti-gay movement and show how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Russia's new scapegoats

Apr 19, 2017

A Russian journalist is murdered in St. Petersburg – not for what he’s reported, but for being gay. Reveal exposes what it's really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. Reveal traces the roots of the anti-gay movement and shows how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Joe Wolf / Flickr Creative Commons

Dystopian films take viewers to cities in the sky and barren, post-apocalyptic landscapes. They explore futuristic universes while also tapping into the darker side of the human condition. 

In this episode of "Movies on the Radio," listeners discuss their favorite dystopian films. Host Frank Stasio talks with experts Marsha Gordon, film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art, about how dystopian art emerges from societal reaction to politics and government.

Laura Boyes will host a screening of the 1930 Film "King of Jazz" at Friday, April 21 at 8 p.m. at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. 

And on May 5, you can catch Marsha Gordon at a special screening of The Big Red One at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh. 

Jeff Roffman

In June 1944, a group of Jewish prisoners performed Giuseppe Verdi’s “Requiem Mass” to a group of Nazi officers at the Theresienstadt concentration camp. The performance was a subversive and artistic act of defiance by the Jewish prisoners. In 2008, Maestro Murry Sidlin founded The Defiant Requiem Foundation to commemorate the event. Sidlin conducts Verdi’s “Requiem Mass” alongside testimonies and footage from the concentration camps.

Mother's Day Special 2017

Apr 17, 2017
Samuel Lewis Lee
Photo by Jason Falchook

Ophira Eisenberg confronts her fertility during a crisis.
Terry Wolfisch Cole wants preferential treatment as the oldest sister.
Andy Christie sends off his mother with a melody.
Samuel Lewis Lee is looked after by a mother's love.

More Women In The World

Apr 17, 2017
Jane Otai
Photo by Jason Falchook

Mary Kate O'Flanagan takes charge and responsibility at a funeral.

Gail Breslow is confronted about her religion at a school in Germany.

Ally Mason relunctantly fills a role in a school play.

Bess Stillman struggles with the difficulties of being a doctor.

Aryana Rose falls in love with a younger man.

Jane Otai takes action after suffering loss.

Leonard Rogoff

Gertrude Weil spent her life fighting for civil rights in the South. She founded the state's League of Women Voters and campaigned against lynching and segregation. She cleverly navigated the fault lines that marked politics in North Carolina in the early 20th century. In new the book, "Gertrude Weil: Jewish Progressive in the New South" (UNC Press/2017), Leonard Rogoff exposes the roots of Gertrude Weil's activism.

An image of Russian composer Peter Tchaikovsky
Public Domain

19th-century Russian composer Peter Tchaikovsky is considered one of the most popular composers in history. However the man behind ballets like “Swan Lake” and “The Nutcracker” had a secret that clouded his personal life. Even though he never publicly came out, Tchaikovsky was gay. His sexual identity influenced his work and may have contributed to his mysterious and sudden death.

Sound Opinions: Review Round-Up

Apr 13, 2017

Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot give their take on several of the biggest new records, from Spoon to Mastodon, in this Review Roundup. Plus, a conversation and performance with Scottish duo Honeyblood.

Nina Berman

Nina Berman has been capturing stories as a professional photographer since the late 1980s. She is best known for her photos capturing military culture and veteran issues in the wake of Sept. 11. She documented the militarization of American life with the collection “Homeland” and told the stories of wounded veterans in “Purple Hearts- Back from Iraq.”

Toxic burden

Apr 13, 2017

At a time when environmental protections are under more threats than ever, Reveal visits minority communities facing toxic burdens.

Tell Us About Your Party Fouls!

Apr 12, 2017
2976713014_f3d27c7f72_o.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Nasher Musuem of Art

 Nina Chanel Abney was drawn to art at an early age. As a kid growing up in Chicago, she stayed busy by doodling and making collages with comics in the newspaper. As she got older, her work began to take on more political themes, including racism, police brutality and the impact of social media. The exhibition “Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush” features about 30 of Abney’s paintings, watercolors and collages.

Lucinda Devlin

For more than 40 years, photographer Lucinda Devlin has captured unique scenes across the country. Her images are social commentaries on things like the death penalty and agribusiness. The exhibit "Lucinda Devlin: Sightlines" spans Devlin's career and features 83 of her photographs.

www.abigaildowd.com

After working in city politics, and running an art school, Abigail Dowd needed a change. She packed up her great-grandfather’s guitar and took off to Florence, Italy, to Ireland, and later to Maine, to spend some time reconnecting with herself and her music. The trip turned into an eight-year journey.

Pages