Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
8:21 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Youth Radio: Gang Life Puts Dead End In Sight

Kamaya Truitt-Martin was a reporter with WUNC's Youth Radio Institute this summer.
Credit WUNC

This summer WUNC has been working with six youth reporters as part of the Summer Youth Radio Institute in our American Graduate Project.

There’s a dangerous game playing out in North Durham neighborhoods every day.  Dashaun Richardson, one of my old classmates, spends most of his time in a neighborhood around Dowd Street, just a few blocks from the WUNC studios. He knows that winning this game means surviving and losing comes with real consequences.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Fri August 30, 2013

August 1963: Fred Battle Speaks About Getting Arrested In Greensboro

Fred Battle went to NC A & T in the 1960s and talks about his experience getting arrested for civil rights protests.
Credit Alexander Stephens

Fred Battle talks about participating in civil rights demonstrations as a student at NC A & T.

Today in our “August 1963” series, we hear from Fred Battle. Battle was a football star for the Mighty Tigers of Chapel Hill’s Lincoln High School, before being awarded an athletic scholarship to North Carolina A&T in Greensboro. It was there that his participation in civil rights actions expanded.

My name is Fred Battle, and in August of 1963 I was entering into my sophomore year at North Carolina A&T State University. And we were up in the D.C. area where we were playing Quantico Marines in a football game.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Thu August 29, 2013

August 1963: Millie Dunn Veasey, Former Raleigh NAACP President, Talks About Sit-Ins

Millie Dunn Veasey went to the March on Washington and was the first female president of the Raleigh-Wake NAACP.
Credit Alexander Stephens

Our “August 1963” series continues today with Millie Dunn Veasey. Veasey is 95 years old—she was born in Raleigh in 1918. During World War II, she served overseas with the Women’s Army Corps. Veasey returned home to attend St. Augustine’s College, where she worked as executive secretary to President James Boyer. While there, she became active in the Raleigh civil rights movement, eventually serving as the first female president of the Raleigh-Wake NAACP.

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Arts & Culture
5:16 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

NOAA Dedicates Sign Marking 40 Years Since USS Monitor's Discovery

The wreck of the Civil War vessel USS Monitor lies off the coast of Cape Hatteras. It's been 40 years since its discovery.
Credit Monitor National Marine Sanctuary / noaa.gov

The NOAA’s Monitor National Marine Sanctuary held a ceremony in Beaufort yesterday to unveil sign recognizing the 40th anniversary of the USS Monitor's discovery. The sign is the first of five to be dedicated that marks a place of significance in the Civil War vessel’s history. The USS Monitor was discovered 40 years ago in 230 feet of water about 16 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras. 

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The State of Things
11:43 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Doris Duke's Shangri La Comes To Durham

The Nasher Museum brings Doris Duke's Islamic art collection in Hawaii to North Carolina.
Credit Doris Duke Foundation

Experts discuss Doris Duke’s 'Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art'

Doris Duke, heiress to the American Tobacco Company fortune, built a sprawling estate in Hawaii in the 1930s. She named her secluded getaway Shangri La and she spent the rest of her life filling it with Islamic art. After her death, Shangri La was opened to the public.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Wed August 28, 2013

August 1963: Howard Clement Remembers MLK At March On Washington

Howard Clement is serving his 30th and final year as a Durham City Council member this fall.
Credit City of Durham

Howard Clement talks about attending the March on Washington in 1963 and the repercussions of that decision at his workplace.

Today in our “August 1963” series looking back at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington, we meet Howard Clement. Howard, as his friends say, is one of the few people in Durham everyone knows simply by his first name. He first moved to Durham in 1961, shortly after finishing law school, to work as an attorney for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company.

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Arts & Culture
4:57 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Winston-Salem Church Ends Partnership With Boy Scouts

A church in Winston-Salem is Forsyth is ending its partnership with the Boy Scouts of America after more than 60 years.
Credit Flickr - DaveBlume

A church in Winston-Salem is ending its partnership with the Boy Scouts of America after more than 60 years.

A church in Winston-Salem is ending its partnership with the Boy Scouts of America after more than 60 years. Earlier this week leaders at Calvary Baptist Church released a video announcing the decision.  The National organization announced this spring it would remove a restriction denying membership to youths based on sexual orientation. Calvary Baptist is part of the Old Hickory Council, which covers eight counties in the state. It is not the first church to end a chartered partnership.

“We know, I’m going to say three to five right now, some are still in the process of deliberations right now; but three to five out of 135 or so charter organizations who are, or may be ending their relationship with scouting,” said Steve Wilburn, Scout Executive for the Old Hickory Council, which includes eight counties. Leaders from the church declined to do a recorded interview.

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The State of Things
11:06 am
Tue August 27, 2013

The Duke Professor Who Secretly Wrote Romance Novels

Credit http://www.katharineashe.com / http://www.katharineashe.com

Duke Professor Katherine Dubois talks with Frank Stasio about writing romance novels.

In Katharine Ashe's latest book, "I Married the Duke," the heroine Arabella takes passage on a ship through the English Channel and meets a rough and tumble sailor who is not what he seems. 

Secret identities and characters in disguise are some of Katharine Ashe's favorite tropes.  Perhaps because the writer herself is not what she seems.

Ashe has received acclaim and popular success as a romance novelist.  But she leads a second life as Katharine Brophy Dubois, a visiting assistant professor in the History Department and Religion Department at Duke University.

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Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

August 1963: James Foushee Recounts A Hunger Strike In Chapel Hill

March 1964: the Holy Week fasters. James Foushee is on the far right. Others, from L to R, are Patrick Cusick, LaVert Taylor and John Dunne.
Credit Copyright Al Amon, From the John Ehle Papers (#4555), Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Our series, “August 1963,” continues to look back at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington. Today we hear from James Foushee. As a teenager in Chapel Hill, he emerged as one of the leaders of the local civil rights movement.

My name is James Foushee. August of 1963, the 28th day, I was at the March on Washington in Washington, D.C.

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NC Symphony Broadcast
7:15 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

"Fireworks" And A Piece That Incited A Riot - Stravinsky & NC Symphony For Aug 26

A 'Rite of Spring' ballet performance
Credit drama_huddersfield / flickr

At its premiere in Paris in 1913 Igor Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring" caused a near-riot. There's debate over whether it was the unconventional ballet score or the avant-garde choreography (or the two combined) that enraged the audience. That first audience witnessed surprisingly modern music and evocative, provocative dance. Conductor Grant Llewellyn explains:

Grant Llewellyn, in an interview with series host David Hartman, talks about the 'riot' that occurred at the first performance of 'The Rite of Spring' and goes on to explain the basic concept of the ballet.

Today, the piece is considered a masterpiece and to mark its 100th anniversary, the North Carolina Symphony presents it with Grant Llewellyn conducting as part of the August 26 broadcast concert here on WUNC. The program airs Monday night at 10 p.m. It was recorded in Meymandi Concert Hall in Raleigh.

"Vibrant" and "virtuosic" are two of the words used by series host David Hartman to introduce the explosive "Fireworks" by Stravinsky that opens this program.  It's a short orchestral piece that prefigures a later work by Stravinksy, "The Firebird."

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