Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Mon August 26, 2013

August 1963: Carrie Farrington Remembers Racism In Chapel Hill Schools

Carrie Farrington
Credit Alexander Stephens

Today we begin our series, “August 1963,” a look at North Carolina at the time of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. This week marks the 50th anniversary of the march, and producer Alexander Stephens asked North Carolinians to think back to August of ‘63.

My name is Carrie Farrington. In August of 1963, I was a rising seventh grader at Chapel Hill Junior High School.

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Arts & Culture
4:43 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

NC Residents Head To DC For 50th Anniversary March

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking in Washington, DC.
Credit US Govt.

Leoneda Inge reports on NC residents headed to Washington, DC for march.

Busloads of people are headed to Washington, DC tomorrow to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, and North Carolina will be well represented.

Andrea Harris was 15 years old in 1963 when Martin Luther King Junior gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.”

“The Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity," King said 50 years ago.

“I didn’t go then so I have to go now," said Harris.

Harris heads the North Carolina Institute for Minority Economic Development in Durham.

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The State of Things
11:19 am
Fri August 23, 2013

From Louisiana To Hollywood

The Lost Bayou Ramblers play songs from their new album Mammoth Waltz on The State of Things.
Credit Lost Bayou Ramblers

Last year's independent film Beasts of the Southern Wild was a surprise box office hit.  The movie garnered four Oscar nominations and near universal acclaim. The soundtrack to the swampland fantasy prominently featured the music of The Lost Bayou Ramblers, a band born in Louisiana’s Cajun country. Host Frank Stasio talks with band members Louis Michot, Andre Michot, Cavan Carruth and Pauly Deathwish about their blended sound and the film. 

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Arts & Culture
6:00 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Youth Radio: Burmese Refugees Help Each Other Out In Carrboro

Akib Khan was a reporter with WUNC's Youth Radio Institute this summer.
Credit WUNC

Akib Khan looks into the growing community of Burmese refugees in Carrboro.

This summer WUNC has been working with six youth reporters as part of the Summer Youth Radio Institute in our American Graduate Project.  Akib Khan moved with his family to the U.S. from Dhaka, Bangladesh when he was nine years old. He reports on the Burmese refugee community in Carrboro.

Abdul Hussain and his family came to Carrboro in July. Hussain grew up in Burma. He says when he was 13, the local government made false allegations against him, forcing him to flee his homeland and that this happens to many minorities in Burma. He lived in Malaysia for years before finally being granted asylum in the United States. When he arrived, the first thing he did was look for something familiar—as a Muslim, he wanted to find a mosque.

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Arts & Culture
2:00 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Hundreds Of Items From Duke-Semans Estate Up For Auction

A Steinway piano along with about 500 other items from Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans' estate will be up for auction this weekend.
Credit Brunk Auctions

This weekend, bidders will have the opportunity to take home a piece of North Carolina history when hundreds of items from Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans' estate go up for auction.

Semans was a longtime Durham philanthropist and the great-granddaughter of Washington Duke, who helped to create Duke University and founded the American Tobacco Company. She passed away in early 2012, and left a lifetime's collection of art, jewelry, furniture and household items behind.

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The State of Things
12:01 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

From Maid To Novelist, A Writer’s Journey

Credit Amazon.com / Amazon.com

    

Nancy Peacock’s path to becoming a successful writer wasn’t normal but it was fun. She got interested in writing in the 4th grade when a teacher introduced her to the arts.

"I loved books," she said. "I loved storytelling, but I didn't know that was something that adults actually did."

She skipped college, choosing instead to marry her high school sweetheart.

“Certainly by not going to college, I had to work. I was sort of thrown into the work-a-day world,” she said.   

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NC Symphony Broadcast
6:07 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Musical Mystery, "The Enigma Variations" - NC Symphony Broadcast For Aug 19

Sir Edward Elgar
Credit P.D.

"A musical mystery. Sir Edward Elgar's 'Enigma Variations' have confounded music scholars and music fans since its premiere. Elgar tells us that the theme is never actually played during the piece.  So, just what is the theme and where did it come from?"

So begins series host David Hartman's introduction to the broadcast concert of the North Carolina Symphony for Monday August 19. The program airs on WUNC at 10 p.m. and will be available for on-line listening for the week following.

During the course of the broadcast conductor Grant Llewellyn presents some of the theories that try to get to the bottom of the Elgar enigma. The piece itself is a series of fourteen variations.  The missing part is the theme. Generally, when a composer presents a series of variations, either the theme is a well known and obvious tune (like, say, "Yankee Doodle") or the theme is clearly stated at the beginning of the piece. In the "Enigma Variations" that foundation is missing.

Conductor Grant Llewellyn puts on his sleuthing cap and joins the audience in the search for the answer to Elgar's Enigma Variations. (Short excerpt from this NC Symphony broadcast of Aug 19)

For Elgar's own first performance of the piece the composer wrote: "The Enigma I will not explain - its 'dark saying' must be left unguessed, and I warn you that the connection between the Variations and the Theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through and over the whole set another and larger theme 'goes', but is not played." Additionally, Elgar dedicated the piece to "my friends pictured within" as each variation is presented as an affectionate portrayal of someone Elgar knew.

See if you can solve the heretofore unsolved musical mystery as you join Grant Llewellyn in search of the answer to Elgar's "Enigma Variations."

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Last Motel
5:47 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Mandolin Orange On Last Motel

L-R: Jeff Crawford, host Eric Hodge, Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz. Mandolin Orange appear on 'Last Motel' on Sunday Aug 18 at 6 p.m.
Credit Al Wodarski / WUNC

Mandolin Orange is a Chapel Hill-based duo combining the talents of Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz. Mixing elements of folk and traditional elements with rock n roll and country music, their music is predominantly acoustic-based featuring guitars, mandolins, fiddles mixed in with various other instruments. Both Emily and Andrew grew up in North Carolina and their roots show in their songs.

Mandolin Orange have just released their latest.  It's called "This Side of Jordan." 

Andrew and Emily along with bassist Jeff Crawford dropped by the WUNC studios, checked into Last Motel, and chatted with Eric Hodge for Sunday's broadcast. They play some tunes in-studio from their new album.  You can hear the full interview and conversation Sunday night August 18 at 6 p.m. Here's a highlight:

Mandolin Orange chat with Eric Hodge during 'Last Motel' about their new album 'This Side of Jordan.' They play a song from that new release just out.

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The State of Things
11:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Superchunk: One Band, Two Decades, Ten Albums

The album cover for Superchunk's latest alum,'I Hate Music.'
Credit mergerecords.com

After 24 years together, the Chapel Hill indie-rock group Superchunk is releasing their 10th studio album, I Hate Music.  

Host Frank Stasio talks with band members Mac McCaughan and Jim Wilbur about the quirky album title and the band’s evolution. They will also perform  acoustic versions of their latest songs.

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Arts & Culture
10:10 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Update: Divers Recover Two Additional Cannons From Blackbeard’s Ship

One of two cannons raised from Blackbeard's Queen Anne Revenge on Friday, August 16, 2013.
Credit NC Dept. of Cultural Resources

Researchers off the North Carolina coast are on dive number two for the year. Their goal is to recover artifacts from the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship, Queen Anne's Revenge, which ran aground near Beaufort nearly 300 years ago.

Project Director Bill Ray Morris says this excavation will focus on the forward part of the ship near the bow.

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