Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Icy waterside
Belinda Novika Follow / Flickr - Creative Commons

A range of national and international events in the past decade have thrust conversations about race into the forefront of public consciousness. And with these conversations come questions about terminology like ‘whiteness’ and ‘blackness’. What is ‘whiteness,’ where did the idea of a ‘white race’ come from, and how has that idea changed over time? These are questions explored in “Seeing White,” a miniseries that is part of the podcast “Scene On Radio,” produced at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.  

An image of the gospel singer Mary D. Williams
Charlie Shelton-Ormond / WUNC

When Mary D. Williams was a kid growing up in Garner, North Carolina, she often visited her grandparents in Johnston County. She remembers passing a sign that said, “You are in the heart of Klan country” along the way. The sign was a visible example of the racism her grandparents endured in rural North Carolina.

Picture of Margaret Maron
Bob Witchger / Margart Maron

In 1981, Margaret Maron published a mystery novel about NYPD homicide detective Sigrid Harald and her investigation of a poisoning. More than 35 years and 31 titles later, Maron felt she had one more story to tell before retiring from novel writing.


Loamlands

Kym Register and Will Hackney are Loamlands, a folk-rock band whose often dark lyrics focus on local stories like urban development in Durham and overlooked queer history. The title track off their newest album, “Sweet High Rise,” is a direct reflection on watching the One City Center on Main Street in Durham climbs upward, forever changing the city skyline. Register’s thoughtful lyrics are supported and sometimes played off against contrasting layers of Hackney’s arrangements.


Your Customizable ‘Look Up and Listen!’ Invitation

Jun 23, 2017

Instructions: Copy and paste everything below the dotted line into an email to your invitees. Then customize the text, hit send, and party!

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Guess what! You’re invited to an outdoor listening party for one of my favorite podcasts, The Dinner Party Download! Come enjoy food, drinks, activities and an auditory tour of nature and the night sky with Neil deGrasse Tyson, the Fleet Foxes, Feist and more!

Look-Up-And-Listen_listening_kit.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

While you set out on your own journey into nature to hear our “Look Up and Listen!” audio adventure, we want to make sure that you’re not lacking in inspiration!

Test

Jun 22, 2017

Trial and terror

Jun 22, 2017

President Donald Trump has used the threat of foreign-born terrorists to justify his travel ban – but since 9/11, nearly every terrorist attack in the United States has come from within. On this episode of Reveal, we investigate which domestic terror episodes get tracked and why.

Sound Opinions: Best of 2017...So Far

Jun 22, 2017

There are still six months of 2017 left, but there are already lots of contenders for album of the year. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of their favorites of the year...so far. Plus, we hear picks from Sound Opinions listeners. 

Cover of 'Bohemian South: Creating Countercultures, from Poe to Punk.'
UNC Press

When it comes to bohemian art scenes and creative subcultures, the South has often been overshadowed – or sometimes even dismissed – in favor of metropolitan areas like New York or San Francisco. But a new book seeks to highlight the creative thinkers and diverse art scenes that influenced culture in the South, as well as those that permeated into the art, literary, and food scenes in northern states.


Cover of 'The Whole Way Home' by Sarah Creech
William Morrow/2017 / William Morrow/2017

Over the years, country music has seen iconic women like Patsy Cline, Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn become legends in the Country Music Hall of Fame. Nevertheless, country music remains a boy’s club for many artists. In her new novel “The Whole Way Home” (William Morrow/2017), writer Sarah Creech tells the story of one woman’s road to country music stardom.


Fleet Foxes

It's been six years since the last release from Fleet Foxes.  The Seattle-based band's first two records met with critical and commercial success, selling more than 2-million copies and winding up on many a critic's best of list.  The music found a home with a large and loyal fan base, but more than half-a-decade is a long wait. 

 Gal Gadot arrives at the world premiere of "Wonder Woman" in Los Angeles.
Jordan Strauss/Invision / AP - 2017

Superheroes have captured the American imagination since the 1930s. Characters including Superman, Batman and Spiderman represented men of strength and moral fiber who inspired as they fought the forces of evil. It was an easy jump to the silver screen, where today, multiple superhero films are released every year, blowing up box office records as often as they do the bad guys.


Motherlove, Money, and War

Jun 21, 2017
Jamaica Kincaid

Josh Axelrad has already lost many thousands of dollars gambling, but can’t resist stopping at a small casino.

Jamaica Kincaid longs for her mother’s love in Antigua.

Sebastian Junger reports on war in Afghanistan but only comprehends its full darkness after a profound personal loss.  
NOTE: When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description. 

Cover of 'Be Free Or Die,' written by Cate Lineberry
St. Martin's Press - 2017 / St. Martin's Press - 2017

 In May 1862, Robert Smalls became a Union hero overnight when he stole a Confederate steamer from the Charleston harbor. Smalls had been enslaved his whole life and decided to free himself and his family by stealing the Planter and piloting it to the Union fleet outside Charleston, South Carolina. 


Brett Williams as Kate Monster and Aaron Boles as Princeton
Areon Mobasher​ / Avenue Q

“Everyone’s a little bit racist,” according to the characters in the musical “Avenue Q.” The humorous show stars humans and puppets who are grappling with the realities of being imperfect adults in an imperfect world. It involves drinking, harsh language and nude puppets. Raleigh Little Theatre brings the show to the stage with a performance featuring a local cast and original puppets. 

Artist Kate Rhudy
Kendall Bailey / Kate Rhudy

Raleigh-based singer-songwriter Kate Rhudy picked up a violin when she was just a kid. She spent her childhood at fiddler’s conventions and regularly played folk music at home with her family. Now she has channeled her reflections on relationships, romance, and life on the road in her debut album “Rock N’ Roll Ain’t For Me.” 

Chatham County Line
Patrick Shanahan / Yep Roc Music Group

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

On this episode Eric Hodge talks with John Teer and Dave Wilson of Chatham County Line about their song 'Moving Pictures Of My Mind' from the album Autumn.

Speaking about the song, Dave Wilson says he was trying to connect the classic old movie sound to the modern experience.

Listen to the episode here:

Sound Opinions: Musical Road Trip

Jun 15, 2017

ANNOUNCER COPY:

Coming up on Sound Opinions...Jim and Greg take you on a musical road trip, playing songs about American cities and states, from the bustling streets of New York City to the beaches of California. Later, they’ll review the final album from rock and roll legend Chuck Berry.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

FEATURE:

America's ring of fire

Jun 14, 2017

Last fall, Reveal reporters found that wildfires were spreading to new parts of the country, and to more densely populated areas. Now, we revisit that hour with a new story about Kansas, a state that’s battling not only wildfires, but also significant underfunding of its forest firefighter team.

A Daring Trapeze Artist and How The Leotard Got Its Name

Jun 14, 2017
Jules_Léotard2.jpg
Douglas, Emerald

The History Lesson

Jules Leotard was born to fly.

You wouldn’t have guessed it when he was a teen. Back then, he studied law and was on his way to becoming some kind of barrister. But his father taught gymnastics, which may explain why, in his spare time, Jules started practicing acrobatics, specifically, spectacular stunts on the trapeze. Instead of using a net, he swung around over his Dad’s swimming pool.

Picture of author, John Grisham
Billy Hunt / Grisham Publicity

 

John Grisham is a masterful and prolific storyteller best known for his courtroom dramas. But in his latest book, “Camino Island” (Doubleday/2017), Grisham breaks from the courtroom and brings readers into the underworld of rare and stolen books. 

Photo of author, Richard Russo
Elena Ceibert / Penguin Random House Speakers Bureau

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo started thinking a lot more about the trajectory of his life once he turned 50. In his new book, his characters are going through a similar process.   

The Moth StorySLAM

Jun 14, 2017
Allison Evans

John Dubuc, a “man’s man," goes to a yoga retreat and gets in touch with his inner cat.
Leah Benson finds what she thought was a love letter, but instead was the translated lyrics to “I Will Survive.” 
Kathi Kinnear Hill in 60s Portland is forbidden from entering a club pool because she is black.
Tom Herndon watches his mother run a scam at O'Hare Airport.

DPAC, Durham, Broadway, Durham Revitalization
HuthPhoto

The Durham Performing Arts Center – better known as DPAC – is gearing up to present its 10th Broadway season. The top-notch productions and sell-out plays and concerts have surprised and delighted critics and get a lot of credit for the rebirth of this southern city.

After the bubble burst

Jun 9, 2017

America's housing bust created both winners and losers – and homeowners have been the biggest losers. Last year, the rate of homeownership in the U.S. fell to its lowest point since the 1960s. So who are the winners? This episode of Reveal takes you into the world of people who are still profiting, from rent-to-own investors in Detroit to President Donald Trump's best friend, a real estate mogul.

Picture of Nina Riggs
Toni Tronu

Nina Riggs was not surprised when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015. She knew the disease ran in her family, and she’d spent years watching her mother battle cancer. Once Riggs’ cancer turned metastatic and incurable, she decided to reflect through writing.

Shana Tucker poses with her cello
Lei Rivera Photography

For cellist and singer-songwriter Shana Tucker, the last two years have been a whirlwind. She has been busy promoting her first album "Shine" which received widespread recognition for its original songwriting and distinctive sounds. Tucker recently left her job performing with Cirque du Soleil in Las Vegas to pursue new opportunities in her independent career.

Sound Opinions: Generic Promo "We're Here For You"

Jun 9, 2017

New :30 generic promo. Lighthearted, focusing on caller interaction.

Sound Opinions: Benmont Tench

Jun 8, 2017

Keyboard player Benmont Tench was instrumental in the formation of Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers in 1976. He's also had a fruitful career as a consummate sideman and session musician, working with artists like Bob Dylan, Stevie Nicks, U2, Johnny Cash, and more. Tench joins hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot for some lively conversation about his successful career in music. And we review the latest from soul-rocking guitarist and singer Benjamin Booker. 

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