Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

a 196-foot-long lit Chinese Dragon
Ryan Wilusz / WUNC

The Cary Booth Amphitheatre has been transformed into a mesmerizing and bright setting with more than 20 displays as part of the North Carolina Chinese Lantern Festival.

Rohan Ayinde

North Carolina is one of only two states in the US where 16 and 17 years old kids are routinely charged as adults for even the most minor offenses. This policy has serious consequences for the youth involved. In this bonus podcast episode, poet Kane Smego shares a gripping poem called, “Oh Carolina”  about justice and conflict in North Carolina. 

Download the Bonus Episode Now

Photo of comedian Josh Gondelman
Yvette Albinowski

Comedian Josh Gondelman has earned the nickname the “nicest man in comedy,” for his inherently decent and astute comedic style. But many in that world may also consider him to be one of the luckiest men in the business because comedy writing is part of both his day and night jobs.

An image of comedian Paula Poundstone
Michael Schwartz

More than 30 years ago, comedian Paula Poundstone hopped on a Greyhound bus and traveled the country performing in small comedy clubs.  Over the years, Poundstone rose up through the ranks of comedy and eventually earned her own HBO special.

Michelle Lanier

Note: This program is a rebroadcast. It originally aired May 2, 2016.  

Michelle Lanier’s roots in North Carolina are so deep that she describes “every branch of her family tree having at least a sapling that crosses into the state.” She has a great-grandparent who preached at the oldest black Episcopal church in the state, one who was salesmen on Durham’s Black Wall Street, and one who helped establish the state’s first black high school.  

photo of Rissi Palmer
Rissi Palmer

Note: This is a Rebroadcast. This program originally aired July 15, 2016.

Singer-songwriter Rissi Palmer exploded onto the country music scene in 2007 with a self-titled album. She sang alongside Taylor Swift and Lady Antebellum, and her single "Country Girl" was the first song by an African-American woman artist to make the country Billboard charts in almost two decades.

surfer at sunrise
Jenni Koontz / https://epicshutter.com

Since she was a child, Jenni Koontz has taken an interest in photography.

“I always used film cameras until my freshman year of college,” said Koontz, 32, who lives on Hatteras Island in Avon, North Carolina with her daughter Emma Sage.

Movies on the Radio
WUNC

From sappy to silly to downright vile, Hollywood has tried for generations to capture the many facets of the American family. Just in time for Thanksgiving, and for this month’s Movies on the Radio program, we asked our listeners for their favorite movies about families. In their choices, listeners often saw a version of their own family struggles splashed across the silver screen.

Family, Neighbors and Extraordinary Proof

Nov 22, 2016
Melanie Yazzie
Photo by Jessica Taves

Shannon Cason attempts to find peace in a neighborhood disturbance.
Melanie Yazzi shares stories from her childhood on the Navajo Nation.
David Walsh goes against popular opinion to uncover one of the greatest sports scandals in recent history.

NOTE: When offensive or FCC-prohibited words appear, they are bleeped and listed in the Content Advisory.  Sensitive content will be given an on-air caution and will be noted here in the description. 

Jon Eric Johnson

A woman dressed as a 1960s secretary sits in front of a rare vintage typewriter and asks people to engage in something even more rare – to share their unedited political opinions with a stranger. It’s all part of the “I Wish to Say” performance art project created by Sheryl Oring.

Image of Ivey Ghee and her mother, participants in the podcast 'Out In The South'
Jeff Sykes

The series "Out In The South" features the narratives of five generations of LGBTQ Southerners. It showcases residents' experiences navigating their identity in a cultural environment that can be supportive at times, and polarizing at others. The series includes a podcast and a written component published by Greensboro-based publication YES!Weekly

Triangle-based musician Jasmé Kelly grew up singing in church choirs and eventually decided to pursue music as an independent musician. Kelly combines her upbringing in gospel with popular blues and soul aesthetics in her new album called "Lady Jasmé."

A picture of Skylar Gudasz.
dukeperformances.duke.edu

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast with a look at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

Steven's "famous" pecan pie
Steven Petrow

Kim Severson of The New York Times joins me for a  special holiday episode of The Civilist podcast. Right at the top we make a promise: To give you the best advice we know to make your Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, or Christmas run smoothly, whether you're talking politics or turkey.

Kim and I tackled a number of “battleground” issues, including:

Rob Me Ronnie

Nov 18, 2016
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McGovern, Kathleen

The History Lesson

This week back in 2001, Ronnie Biggs returned to England. For most people, robbing a train is a pretty unusual thing to do. For Ronnie Biggs, that was just the beginning. The robbery went down on August 8th, 1963 — Ronnie’s birthday. Which he decided to celebrate by helping some pals steal 2.6 million pounds sterling from a mail train. Today, that’d be $60 million bucks. It was the biggest heist in British history.

Image of Dyanna Taylor and Dorothea Lange
Paul Taylor

Dorothea Lange is best known for her portraiture photography documenting America’s Great Depression. Her image “Migrant Mother” depicts a destitute woman with three children in California. It is one of the most recognized photographic portrayals of that era. When Lange passed away in 1965, her granddaughter, Dyanna Taylor, inherited one of her cameras and began to follow in her footsteps.

 

Image of Luray Performing Live
Courtesy of Luray

Shannon Carey grew up playing guitar in a musical family. She wrote her own songs in high school, but then started a career as a social worker and put her passion for music to the side. Years later she witnessed both of her younger brothers pursuing their musical dreams, one alongside the now-famous Bon Iver, and decided to pursue her own musical career.

Bonus: Anthony Bourdain Extended Interview

Nov 18, 2016
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The Splendid Table

In addition to our regular episodes, we occasionally offer Splendid Table Sides - extended interviews and other bonus cuts that don’t make it into the broadcast show. For this Side, Anthony Bourdain joins Lynne Rossetto Kasper talk about his new book, Appetites, the stress of cooking for five people versus 500, making Spam musubi for his daughter's school lunch, and his Oval Office-approved opinion on the matter of ketchup on a hot

The Tamarind

Nov 16, 2016
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McGovern, Kathleen

The History Lesson

This week back in 1922, the entrance to King Tut’s tomb was discovered. Tut’s tomb may be the most important archaeological find in history. And it was all made possible by a bored rich guy.

His name was George Edward Stanhope Molyneux Herbert. And — surprise! — he was a British aristocrat. He loved racing around in newfangled contraptions called “automobiles.” That is, until he crashed one. Frail of health, he started spending winters in Egypt.

The Young American

Nov 16, 2016
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McGovern, Kathleen

The History Lesson

This week back in 1973, an already odd kidnapping — got odder. Money can’t buy happiness. Case in point: John Paul Getty the Third. His grandfather, Getty Senior, was one of the richest oil men on Earth. So when John Paul was kidnapped in Italy at age 16? He probably didn’t think it’d be long before grandpa paid the $17 million dollar ransom.

The Song for Sejong

Nov 16, 2016
Gwanghwamun_Plaza_-_statue_King_Sejong_2016_-_hschrijver.jpg
McGovern, Kathleen

The History Lesson

This week back in 1446 the Korean alphabet was first published. They say the truth will set you free. But first you gotta be able to read the truth. And in 15th-century Korea, most people couldn’t. Read, that is. Or write. How come? Even though everyone spoke Korean, all writing was in a form of Chinese. And Chinese is hard. It’s made up of thousands of complex characters. Only a bunch of elite scholars really understood it. Everyone else was — illiterate.

An image of Dave Chappelle with members of A Tribe Called Quest Joribe White and Q-Tip
Rosalind O'Connor / AP

After years of mostly staying out of the spotlight, comedian Dave Chappelle hosted NBC's  "Saturday Night Live" last week. Chappelle's opening monologue mirrored the stand-up comedy that helped make him famous more than a decade ago. Chappelle's jokes grappled with a Trump presidency.  

Image of South African guitarist Derek Gripper
Coutesy of Derek Gripper

South African musician Derek Gripper has been playing classical music since he was 6-years-old. But after years of studying in Cape Town, he felt uninspired by the classical guitar repertoire available to him, so he set off on a journey to discover musical inspiration from around the world. He traveled first to South India, and then explored Brazilian music before he happened upon the instrument that changed the direction of his career: the kora.

Glare of the spotlight

Nov 16, 2016

Oscar season is upon us, and one of the best picture nominees is a film that hits pretty close to home for us here at Reveal: “Spotlight.” In case you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic church sex abuse scandal. In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.

Bonus: Anthony Bourdain Extended Interview

Nov 16, 2016
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The Splendid Table

Anthony Bourdain (Photo: Dimitrios Kambrouris/Getty)

The secret Trump voter

Nov 15, 2016

It’s over. One of the longest, craziest and most lurid elections in memory is, thankfully, over. So, now that the ballots have been cast, what were the biggest lessons learned? We cut through the noise and ask what matters most: Did democracy win on Election Day? In the first presidential race since the Supreme Court seriously weakened the Voting Rights Act, Reveal examines where the U.S. lived up to its democratic principle – and where our history of voter suppression reared its ugly head.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper Wins Lifetime Achievement Award

Nov 15, 2016
lynne-rossetto-kasper.jpg
The Splendid Table

The Splendid Table's host Lynne Rossetto Kasper was honored recently at the 2016 Charlie Awards. The awards are an annual event celebrating the exceptional contributions of the Twin Cities area restaurant, food and beverage industry. However, Lynne's deep connection to and advocacy of food and good eating goes far beyond the Twin Cities. She shared this thought on the globally connective power of food during her acceptance speech.

PHOTOS: Comicon Fans Descend On Downtown Durham

Nov 13, 2016
Sarah Harrod of Illustrations and Creations by Sarah Harrod sold her products on Saturday at ComicCon.
Sarah Muzzillo / WUNC

Fans of comics, superheroes and cosplay gathered in downtown Durham this weekend for the annual NC Comicon event.

Etiquette-3.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Before Rico and Brendan had all of our guests pile onto the stage to answer our live audience’s etiquette dilemmas at the Now Hear This Festival, they first chatted with guest Annabelle Gurwitch. You may know her from her appearances on TV shows like “Seinfeld,” and “Dexter,” or as host of the TBS series “Dinner and a Movie.”

Gustavo Arellano Pushes A Few Buttons

Nov 11, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Normally during Small Talk, we have a newshound share their favorite under-the-radar story. For our show at the Now Hear This podcast festival, we welcomed to the stage one of the most delightful bomb-throwers in Southern California journalism — Gustavo Arellano.

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