Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Emma Cline Discusses the Cult of Her Hit First Novel

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Emma Cline is author of “The Girls,” this season’s hottest literary debut. The New York Times describes it as, “A seductive and arresting coming-of-age story… told in sentences at times so finely wrought they could almost be worn as jewelry.”

Nicole Dennis-Benn Finds Trouble in Paradise

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Lately, there’s been a flowering of fiction from Caribbean writers. Jamaican-born Marlon James won last year’s Man Booker prize. Now he’s one of a chorus of voices singing the praises of his countrywoman Nicole Dennis-Benn, and her debut novel, “Here Comes The Sun.”

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Gregg Gelb

Note: this program is a rebroadcast. 

Jim Gaffigan Feasts on Your Etiquette Questions

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Each week you send in your questions about how to behave, and answering them this time is Jim Gaffigan.

Over the last 20 years, he’s become one of America’s most-watched stand-up comics, with self-deprecating observations about raising five kids with his wife, and especially about his love of food. In fact, a couple years back, he published the best-selling book called, “Food: A Love Story.”

Sarah Jarosz
Scott Simontacchi / All Eyes Media

Virtuoso Sarah Jarosz, 25, has released her latest project, "Undercurrent."  It's her fourth album, despite only just recently graduating from the New England Conservatory of Music.

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Listening to the Vines (painting by John Wurdeman)

John Wurdeman studied music and art before becoming a winemaker in the country of Georgia. His winery, Pheasant's Tears, has revived an 8,000-year-old Georgian winemaking tradition. He tells Melissa Clark what brought him there, the myriad varieties of Georgian wines, and the integral part they play in that country's meals.

Melissa Clark: How did this all start for you? 

Lost in translation

Jul 22, 2016
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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock

Bonnie Benwick translates chef recipes for the home cook in the Washington Post's Plate Lab column. She tells Melissa Clark about some of the challenges you'll face when attempting a restaurant meal in your own kitchen.

Photo of Yasmin Evans and her mother
Yasmin Evans

As a young Muslim-American journalist, Yasmin Bendaas pays particular attention to how Muslim women are represented in the media.

As international media coverage continues to put a spotlight on the Islamic State Group and American political rhetoric highlights religious stereotypes, Bendaas began to wonder how these representations of Islam have impacted the daily lives of Muslim-American women.

Photo from "Violet"
Jon Gardiner

In the 1960s, when a young woman named Violet has an accident that leaves her with a disfiguring scar, she sets off on a journey from her home in North Carolina to seek the help of a healing preacher in Oklahoma.

Along the way, she meets two soldiers who help in her discovery of inner beauty, and guide in her understanding of racial divides in a new era for the American South.

A brief history of tahini

Jul 21, 2016
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AlexPro9500/Thinkstock

Adeena Sussman gives Sally Swift the backstory on tahini, the suddenly ubiquitous, sesame seed-based condiment.

Sally Swift:  So, tahini. It is everywhere suddenly. So, let’s back up a little bit. Tell us exactly what tahini is.

Adeena Sussman:  Tahini is ideally nothing more than pure ground sesame seeds.

SS:  That’s it?

Nordic cuisine: Leave the herring, take the taco quiche

Jul 21, 2016
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Marcus Nilsson

With almost 800 pages of recipes and striking photography, Magnus Nilsson's The Nordic Cookbook is the definitive work on the food cultures of his native land. He spoke with Melissa Clark about the impact winter has on the Nordic countries, the common source of everyone's family herring recipe, and the enduring popularity of taco quiche.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about music? 

Did you enjoy the humorous depiction of rock stars in "Almost Famous?" Were you moved by the dramatic portrait of Mozart in "Amadeus?" Do you still remember the soundtracks of "American Graffiti" and "Jaws?" Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict musicians and the music industry and discuss memorable movie music.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

229: Farm to fork

Jul 19, 2016

This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.

Photo of Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James speaking at the ESPY Awards.
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

In the past two weeks, violence by and against police has dominated headlines and rattled the country. Protests from movements like #BlackLivesMatter continue while celebrities use speeches and social media as a platform to make their voices heard.

Meanwhile, the ESPN documentary series "O.J.: Made In America" looks at race relations since the 1960s through the life of former athlete O.J. Simpson.

Matthew Ryan
Sarah Kay

Matthew Ryan has been releasing albums for almost two-decades. In that time, he's been compared to everyone from Bruce Springsteen to U2's Bono and Tom Waits and fans of his work include Lucinda Williams.

photo of Keith Knight
Keith Knight

Knight was recently on The State of Things in advance of his appearance at the Durham Comics Fest.

Keith Knight has considered himself a cartoonist since he was in diapers, doodling on the walls of his family home near Boston.

While that spirit of creativity has not changed, the content of Keith's work has taken on more profound issues. Keith is known for drawing a weekly political cartoon called "(Th)ink" that often provides commentary on police brutality, racial profiling, and the black experience in America.

the Historical Haywood Bible Church on Moncure
Amanda D. El Jaouhari / www.amandadeljaouhari.com

Photography became a part of Amanda El Jaouhari's life during her rehabilitation from an injury that ultimately resulted in back surgery. Before the injury, El Jaouhari, 36, said she was unaware of the "parasitic nature of pain" and it was very hard for her to see the beauty in the world even after having a successful operation.

photo of a dress designed by Willie Kay
North Carolina Museum of History

For much of the 20th century, Willie Otey Kay was a household name among the fashion-conscious in Raleigh. The designer and dressmaker crafted one-of-a-kind fashion for women to wear to weddings, debutante balls, and other formal events.

Stories with a Heartbeat Podcast Header Logo
WUNC / WUNC

In a month filled with tragedy, how do we make sense of it all? This week on the podcast, we use a poetic lens to try and find meaning within conflict.

Marijuana is slowly being legalized, with legitimate, profitable businesses popping up in several U.S. states. But in this week's Criminal Podcast, Phoebe Judge tells the story of Meridy Volz, who pioneered a booming pot brownie business in 1970s San Francisco.

Steve Sando's heirloom beans

Jul 15, 2016
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caycebilly/Thinkstock

What rare wines are to some, heirloom beans are to Rancho Gordo's Steve Sando. Lynne Rossetto Kasper talks to him about how he got his start, his favorite kinds of beans, and his "foolproof" method for preparing them.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: So how did you get into beans?

photo of Honest Pint Theatre Company
Megan Dohm

Shakespeare’s "Hamlet" is now more than 400 years old. And while many theatergoers are familiar with its plot lines about murder, death and betrayal, each new staging of the production has the opportunity to highlight a different theme or lesser-known aspect of the story.

Host Frank Stasio previews two different interpretations today. He is joined first by 14-year-old Leo Egger, a student at Durham School of the Arts, whose passion for Shakespeare led him to direct and produce a community production in his neighborhood.

Film Still: A girl awaits her train on a Tokyo subway platform. Tokyo is home to the world’s busiest metro system, with approximately 8.7 million daily riders.
Patrick Shen and Brandon Vedder

For some, silence is defined as the absence of sound. But a new documentary film, "In Pursuit of Silence," explores the many facets of silence. From religious meditation to the natural world, silence is an integral part of existence. And the noise of modern life may be damaging in physical, mental and emotional ways.

What you need to know about aperitivo

Jul 14, 2016
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gregory_lee/Thinkstock

Aperitivo is northern Italy's version of happy hour, only instead of half-priced beers and a sketchy taco bar, light drinks and small plates carry the day. Marisa Huff writes about these cocktails and appetizers in the aptly-titled Aperitivo: The Cocktail Culture of Italy, and speaks with Splendid Table contributor Shauna Sever about them.

Shauna Sever: For the uninitiated, can you paint us a picture of this lovely Italian tradition of aperitivo?

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