Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

University of Georgia Press

  Medgar Evers’s assassination was a spark that motivated social activists and inspired writers, poets and journalists. Artists like Bob Dylan, Eudora Welty and James Baldwin have contributed to the collective memory of Evers through their own works.

Minrose Gwin, professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, talks to host Frank Stasio about her new book, “Remembering Medgar Evers” (University of Georgia Press/2013).

Neal Hutcheson

  For nearly 300 years the Core Sound community has earned a livelihood from the commercial fishing industry. It’s a livelihood that is now seriously threatened. “Core Sounders” is a new documentary that tells the story of a community in transition.

Host Frank Stasio is joined by Walt Wolfram, executive producer and professor of English at North Carolina State University; and Neal Hutcheson, the Emmy-Award winning director, to talk about their new film, “Core Sounders.”

The wreck of the Civil War vessel USS Monitor lies off the coast of Cape Hatteras. Friday marks 150 years to the day since it sank.
Monitor National Marine Sanctuary / noaa.gov

The remains of two Union sailors who went down with the ironclad USS Monitor off the North Carolina coast will be honored Friday at Arlington National Cemetery. 

The Civil War ship sank 150 years ago.  The remains were found in 2002.  Lauren Heesemann is the research coordinator for NOAA's Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. 

"The date for the burial was chosen because its the 151st anniversary of the battle of Hampton Roads which is one of the battles that the Monitor is most known for; the battle of the Monitor versus the Merrimack or the CSS Virginia," Heesemann says.

beyucaffe.com

Organist Gary Brunotte has been playing music since he picked up an accordion at age 9. He went on to study and teach at the prestigious Berklee College of Music, and has been writing, arranging, performing and recording ever since. 

Birds and Arrows on Last Motel
Eric Hodge / WUNC

Birds and Arrows new album Coyotes is out next week.  It's produced by Chris Stamey from the dB's and features guests including Robert Sledge from Ben Folds Five and James Wallace from Mount Moriah.  

Jeffrey L. Cohen via flickr.com

  Sir Walter Ralegh has never set foot in North Carolina. He’s certainly never seen the city that was named for him. But there he is. Airports and cemeteries bear his name; statues of his likeness are all around town. Why does Ralegh have such a hold on the popular imagination?

Host Frank Stasio will try to parse fact from fiction with his guest Christopher Armitage, a professor of English and comparative literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Armitage is working on a book, “Literary and Visual Ralegh: Writings of and Visual Reproductions of Sir Walter Ralegh” (Manchester University Press).

Andrew Rannells, 'The Book of Mormon'
www.bookofmormonbroadway.com

The Durham Performing Arts Center has announced what it calls its biggest season ever.  The Tony Award winning musical “The Book of Mormon” is singing its way to Durham in February 2014.

Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle
annaandelizabeth.com

While many popular musicians today seek out the newest digital technology to enhance their performances, there’s a young musical duo from rural Virginia who are moving in the opposite direction. Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle call themselves simply “Anna and Elizabeth.”  Both accomplished traditional Appalachian musicians on a variety of instruments, together they have resurrected a storytelling tradition called the “crankie,” whose technology outdates their combined age (which is 50).

darkershadesofsymphony.com

Front man Michael Seebold describes his band, Darker Shades of Symphony, as neoclassical metal. If you’ve never heard of that genre, you’re probably not alone.

floatingstone.com

Olympia Stone is a documentary filmmaker in North Carolina, but she extended her reach to New York to capture the story of James Grashow. He is an artist known for his use of odd implements like chicken wire and paper mache.

www.ackland.org

The exhibition "More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s" looks at love as a political force. Thirty-three pieces by 25 artists look at our need for deeper human connection in a world that has been changed by politics, technology and consumerism.  Host Frank Stasio is joined by curator Claire Schneider; and Amanda Hughes, director of external affairs at the Ackland Art Museum, to discuss the works of art.

Back Porch Music Logo
Digital Chips

In addition to a pile of good music on Sunday night's Back Porch Music, you'll have the opportunity for two ticket give-aways.  Those are:

Karal Bonoff at the Carrboro ArtsCenter:

and The Gibson Brothers Brothers at the Fletcher Opera Theater in Raleigh:

'The Next Best Thing' by Overmountain Men
Overmountain Men

Musicians David Childers and Bob Crawford bonded over a shared love of Appalachian music and history. The result is the second CD from their band "The Overmountain Men." Crawford is also the bassist for the Avett Brothers, while Childers has had a long career with the Modern Don Juans.

A dish at Lantern, a previous James Beard Award winner
Lantern

The James Beard Foundation has released its annual list of semifinalists for the Restaurant and Chef Awards. On the list are 13 North Carolina eateries and chefs, 9 of which are in or near the Triangle. The James Beard Awards are considered the highest awards in the food industry. The semifinalists in North Carolina are:

culturalequity.org

Alan Lomax dedicated seven decades of his life to recording and distributing the sound of as much of the globe as he could reach. Beginning as a 17-year-old from Austin, Texas, Alan traveled with his father, John Lomax, to plantations, farms and prisons in the deep South.

Ron Rash's latest collection of short stories is 'Nothing Gold Can Stay.'
Harper Collins Publishers

  Author Ron Rash has been chronicling the Appalachian way of life for nearly two decades. His poetry and fiction have earned him wide acclaim and a position alongside other esteemed writers from western North Carolina. He joins host Isaac-Davy Aronson to discuss his latest book of short stories: “Nothing Gold Can Stay” (HarperCollins/2013).

Beercade: The Last Barfighter
McKinney

Arcade games have long been a popular bar distraction, but Durham-based ad agency McKinney has recently taken coin-operated entertainment to a new level. Instead of inserting quarters and playing for points, two players can now insert their beer cups and battle each other for a drink. They call it the Beercade.

Officers with flag
North Carolina Museum of History

On May 12, 1864 during the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse in Virginia, a Union soldier in hand-to-hand combat with a North Carolina standard-bearer tore the battle flag right off its staff. The flag ripped along its left border, the color-bearer was captured and imprisoned, and the Union soldier who seized the flag was later awarded the Medal of Honor for his deed. Today, the historic flag is on display at the North Carolina Museum of History.

For the first time since 2005, our friends over at UNC-TV will air a concert with Doc Watson and David Holt sharing stories and songs. The 1998 concert  features extended on-stage interviews with Doc Watson, relating the music to North Carolina and providing context and history.

Vote Zach Galifianakis

Feb 15, 2013
The Campaign

To prepare for his new role in “The Campaign” as a small-town conservative in a no-holds-barred congressional race, comedian Zach Galifianakis looked to the past.

Nerys Levy, Russia
Nerys Levy

Where would you go if someone called you and offered you a free trip to anywhere in the world?

For artist Nerys Levy, the choice was easy. “My deceased husband was Russian-Jewish,” says Levy. “I had grown up on the edge of Russian culture in our married life. So there was an emotional quality. I also knew this would be a wonderful artistic experience.” 

As a landscape artist, Levy saw the trip down the Volga River as a creative opportunity.  “The country has such a rich cultural history that has been submerged and is now re-emerging.”  

The Old Ceremony

Feb 15, 2013
www.oldceremony.com

The Old Ceremony is well-known to music lovers in the Triangle.

The band has been playing together for eight years and now their new album “Fairytales and Other Forms of Suicide” will receive an international release. Host Frank Stasio will be joined by the Old Ceremony as they talk about the evolution of their music over the years.

Photo Given by Marjorie Fowler

  When you opened up a children’s book in the 1960s, chances are you saw girls in pink playing with dolls and boys in blue going on adventures. And most of the characters were probably white.

A group of women in Chapel Hill, many of them mothers and academics, decided they wanted to see more diverse and empowering images in children’s literature and took matters into their own hands. This collective became the printing press known as Lollipop Power Inc.

Though some may argue religion has no place in politics, Nancy Petty, pastor of Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh, says that faith can have a powerful role to play.

“I think that religion in political life of our society can be a very healthy thing when it engages people in dialogue,” she said in an interview with Frank Stasio on The State of Things.

Steep Canyon Rangers 'Nobody Knows You' wins Grammy for best bluegrass album of 2012
Steep Canyon Rangers

Here's an update on how some artists with North Carolina connections fared at the Grammys on Sunday February 10.  This article was originally prepared as a Grammy preview looking at the Carolina Chocolate Drops and The Avett Brothers with some of their recent appearances on "The State of Things" on WUNC.

Update 6:11 p.m.

"The Goat Rodeo Sessions" from Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile win for Best Folk Album 2012, edging out the Carolina Chocolate Drops.

Kevin Allison
risk-show.com

  Kevin Allison is perhaps best known for his work on the 1990s-era sketch comedy show “The State”. After it wrapped, he found himself adrift, until he discovered that by being himself on stage, he could get big laughs.

jonshain.com

Jon Shain grew up in a run-down mill town outside of Boston, but got a sense for the finer things in life at Duke University. He also became aware that the well off don’t always recognize the plight of the poor.

'Bloodlines' art by Toni Scott
unc.edu

  As a young person, Toni Scott was inspired by stories passed down of her great-grandmother Fannie. Her exploration of her maternal line led her to grapple with the violence of slavery and African-American oppression.

  Old-time radio may be old-fashioned, but it’s not extinct. Every year, the Murphey School Radio Show brings together North Carolina writers and musicians for a charitable variety show. The next one is coming up February 23.

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