Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Sound Opinions Remembers Chuck Berry

Mar 24, 2017

Chuck Berry died on March 18th at the age of 90. Jim and Greg celebrate the life of Berry by looking at his iconic tracks, as well as his vast influence on future artists. They also talk about his work in later years and what it was like to share a stage with the guitar legend.

Image of folklorist Joseph Hall
Courtesy of Ted Olson, ETSU

More than 4,000 people surrendered their homes and land to create the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The park covers more than 500,000 acres and straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee.

Sound Opinions: Remembering Chuck Berry

Mar 23, 2017

Chuck Berry, one of the architects of rock 'n' roll, has died at age 90. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot reflect on the life, music, and enduring legacy of the legendary guitarist and singer.

  Note: This conversation is a rebroadcast from February 16, 2017.

Brooklyn-based hip-hop artist Talib Kweli entered the music scene in the late 1990s as one half of the duo Black Star. The group stressed the importance of lyricism and wrestled with systems of inequality through rap. Since then, Kweli has maintained a reputation as a “conscious rapper.” He’s collaborated with other hip-hop artists like Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar and Durham-based producer 9th Wonder.

Actor Meshaun Labrone playing Stokely Carmichael in a new one-man show.
DJ Corey Photography / Courtesy of the Artist

Note: This conversation is a rebroadcast from February 16, 2017.

In the early 1960s, Stokely Carmichael was a relatively-unknown young activist working primarily with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Alabama and Mississippi. But he rose to prominence in the summer of 1966 when he introduced the term “black power” into the national dialogue.

Against their will

Mar 22, 2017

Powered by the internet, the sex trade is reaching into all corners of the country. Reveal follows up on what’s happened since we first took you inside the hidden places – real and virtual – where people are exploited for sex. Produced in collaboration with APM Reports, we’ll hear stories from the pot fields of Northern California to the streets of Chicago and suburban Seattle.

Our Podcast Picks for #Trypod

Mar 22, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Brendan Francis Newnam (Co-Host)

Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

Nina Simone's Tryon, NC, Home Sold to Artists

Mar 22, 2017
A clapboard house sits on a hill in the town of Tryon, NC
Courtesy of BPR News

In the 1930s and '40s, the community of Tryon, North Carolina supported local girl Eunice Waymon on her path to becoming a classical pianist. But she veered far from that trajectory, and eventually became an internationally-celebrated jazz and soul singer known as Nina Simone.
 

The three-room wooden house Simone was born and raised in was preserved by community members and recently purchased by four New York City-based artists.

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with Blue Ridge Public Radio reporter Helen Chickering about the house and its future.

A view of the Wake Forest University campus
Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University

Travel + Leisure Magazine has picked Wake Forest University as the most beautiful campus in the state.

The magazine notes that while North Carolina has no shortage of pretty schools, that Wake Forest has "top quality" groundskeeping, and that the buildings are "gorgeous inside and out."

Rosenfeld Media / Flickr

Flying cars, totalitarian regimes, and post-apocalyptic worlds. These are just a few characteristics of the dystopian film genre--movies that explore a twisted view of the future.

A recently retired North Carolina State University professor capped his career with a prestigious international award.

Dr. Ron Sederoff has been awarded the Marcus Wallenberg Prize for his work on the molecular genetics of trees. The award is known as the Nobel prize of forestry.

Martini Madness Round 1

Mar 17, 2017

(Click to enlarge)

Wait, what is this?

It’s the perfect time of year for a totally made up poll we’re calling Martini Madness! Think of it like a basketball tournament, except with booze instead of athleticism.

Playlist 356

Mar 17, 2017

The Sea & Cake – The Argument

Aphex Twin – Girl/Boy Song

Tipsy – Liquordelic

Cyril J. Mockridge – Main Title (From “The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes”)

David Arnold & Michael Price – “Sherlock” Theme Song

The Sugarcubes – Coldsweat (DB/BP Mix)

Candi Staton – He Called Me Baby

J.J. Cale – Cherry

Courtesy The Nile Project

 

The Nile Project is a collective of musicians from countries along the Nile basin. The group tours internationally and brings the eclectic sounds of participants’ native instruments to the stage. The musicians also organize lectures and workshops alongside their performances to discuss water conflict issues affecting their respective countries.

Facing The Dark

Mar 17, 2017
Photo by
Jason Falchook

Kate Braestrup attempts to bring a moment of peace to a difficult crime scene.
John Turturro
ponders his future with an aging mother and dependent brother.
Daniela Schiller
gets a new understanding of her father’s past while studying memory.

Criminal: 'Rochester, 1991'

Mar 17, 2017
A drawing of an engagement ring.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

In this week's Criminal podcast, we hear the story of a woman who suffered domestic violence for years. She then served 17 years behind bars for killing her abuser.

Eye of the storm

Mar 16, 2017

On this episode of Reveal, three stories of men are at the center of controversy. He’s been punched on the streets of Washington, D.C., and kicked out of a major conservative political gathering, and yet white nationalist Richard Spencer has left Montana to set up shop in the nation’s capital. What does he have to show for it? Nearly 30 years ago, six firefighters in Kansas City, Missouri, died in an arson explosion that shook the city. Reveal follows a man in the case who was sent to prison for life as he's released and reunited with his family.

Stories from the President's Kitchen Cabinet

Mar 16, 2017

When Adrian Miller was researching his book on the history of Soul Food, he kept coming across references to African-American cooks who had served in the White House.

Sound Opinion: Desert Island Jukebox

Mar 16, 2017

The proverbial Desert Island Jukebox is filled with songs that hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot would want with them if they were marooned on a remote isle. This week, Jim and Greg hand quarters out to guests like Mary J. Blige, Sleater-Kinney, and Rush to select the tracks they can't live without. Plus, an interview and performance from the Brooklyn rock band Sunflower Bean.

Driving Through a Changing South

Mar 15, 2017
book cover of "Discovering the South: One Man's Travels Through a Changing America in the 1930s."
Courtesy of Jennifer Ritterhouse

In the summer of 1937, Jonathan Daniels, the young, white, liberal-minded editor of the News & Observer, embarked on a driving tour of 10 Southern states. He documented the stories of the diverse people he encountered and hoped to change the national perception of the region.

An image of an advertisement for the play 'The Miraculous and the Mundane'
Manbites Dog Theater

In the new play “The Miraculous and the Mundane,” an African-American family in Durham must readjust their lives when the family’s patriarch begins to show signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Percy Nelson has worked hard to provide for his children, but his health issues begin to fracture the family’s stability.
 

Courtesy E.C. Hanes

When E.C. “Redge” Hanes was looking for a backdrop for his latest novel, he decided to draw from his own experience. He once raised hogs on a farm with his brother, and he also participated in an environmental study commission looking into the impact of hog farming on North Carolina’s ecology.

Hanes’ new book “Justice By Another Name” (Rane Coat Press/2017) is a tale of love and revenge set in fictional Hogg County, North Carolina.
 

An image of UNCA professors and co-hosts Marcus Harvey and Darin Waters
David Allen / UNC-Asheville

Asheville has been home to an African-American community for centuries. However, African-American residents in Asheville and western North Carolina have historically suffered from systemic inequality and racial disparities.

In the new radio program and podcast “The Waters and Harvey Show,” co-hosts Darin Waters and Marcus Harvey examine western North Carolina’s cultural history and the narratives of marginalized communities.
 

Village Bakery

Mar 13, 2017

Courtesy Western Carolina University

Davy Arch grew up on a subsistence farm in western North Carolina. As a boy, he learned the value of traditional Cherokee culture from his grandfather, who taught him the old stories, how to hunt and fish, and how to identify valuable medicinal plants.

Today Arch is a practitioner of traditional medicine, a historian, storyteller and a folk artist with work on display at the Smithsonian Institution.
 

Chess, Romance, and Kathmandu

Mar 13, 2017
Bokara Legendre
Amanda Kowalski

Maurice Ashley describes his development as a chess player under the tutelage of The Black Bear School of Chess.
  Bokara Legendre attends the coronation of a Nepalese king in Kathmandu.

Cynthia Riggs is in her golden years when she reconnects with a coworker from her youth and a romance blooms.

REVEAL Fundraiser Episode Spring 2017

Mar 10, 2017

For the 2017 spring fundraising season, here are three of our favorite recent Reveal stories.

Listener Letters: Jeopardy Players Buzz In

Mar 10, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

This week, we took a moment to gaze into the dark heart of our mailbag/inbox/voicemail aka listener comments.

First up Carl from Dearborn Michigan chides Rico and Brendan for their pronunciation of “restaurateur.” Duly noted, Carl.

Jay Som DJs an Anachronistic Get-Together

Mar 10, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Jay Som first gained attention with songs she wrote in her bedroom and posted online. Not long after, revered indie label Polyvinyl signed her and her debut album of smart lyrics and pop hooks called “Everybody Works,” comes out on March 10.

Here she is to spin music for a Halloween party in Spring… because why not?

Andy Shauf – “To You”

Gillian Jacobs Fakes Love and Tipsiness

Mar 10, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

For six seasons, actor Gillian Jacobs played the wannabe activist Britta Perry in the cult hit comedy show “Community.” She also did a star turn on Season four of HBO’s “Girls,” playing Mimi-Rose — a foil to Lena Dunham’s character, Hannah.

Gillian now stars in “Love” — a show about dating and relationships in modern Los Angeles. She plays Mickey, a program manager at a satellite radio station who struggles with alcohol, romance and just being a good person.

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