Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Mark Katz

Six international artists in North Carolina this week demonstrate that international diplomacy can come in many different forms. While many may imagine diplomats wearing business suits and sitting in conference rooms, these artists paint a drastically different picture.

Jim Carrey
Wikipedia

For the next edition of the "Movies On The Radio" series The State of Things wants to know which movie scenes crack you up. We don't mean scenes that just made you chuckle – we mean knee-slapping, doubled-over, abs-hurt-the-next-day laughter. 

Is it the takeoff scene from Airplane!?

The ribs scene from I'm Gonna Git You Sucka?

Filming of This is My Home Now.
Siera Schubach-Mariah, Dunn Kramer, Dean MacLeod

Some of the first Montagnard immigrants, people from a mountain region of Southeast Asia, to came to North Carolina in 1986 and 1987. They were granted refugee status in recognition of their support to the U.S. Special Forces during the Vietnam War. But since then, the newest immigrants have made their way to America because they were fleeing religious and political prosecution. TheMontagnard families live in two worlds: one that is still close to the traditions and ways of their homeland and the other in modern American society.

Logo for the RiverRun International Film Festival
riverrunfilm.com

The 17th annual RiverRun International Film Festival returns to Winston-Salem this month. 

I Don't Do Boxes is a new LGBTQ magazine created by and for queer youth.
idontdoboxes.org

I Don't Do Boxes is a new magazine that explores and documents the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender experience in the southeast United States. The magazine was founded and edited by the youth-led media program QueerLab. Each issue is designed to provide a unique look at what it means to be queer in the South by tackling topics like identifying as LGBTQ in school or the power of documenting LGBTQ voices.

Black and white photo of band on couch.
thegenuinemusic.com

The Genuine is a four-piece band from Winston-Salem. The band originally began as a project of husband and wife Mathew Allivato and Katelyn Allivato née Brouwer, but now includes an electric guitar, piano and percussion. They are one of the many bands performing at Phuzz Phest in Winston-Salem April 17th -19th, and they will preview their festival performance with a live in-studio performance.

Echo Courts

Apr 10, 2015
Echo Courts plays in Winston-Salem at Phuzz Phest, April 17-19.
Echo Courts

Echo Courts is a five-member surf-rock band out of Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Their second EP, "Ice Cream Social," will have you reaching for your beach towel. But their melancholy lyrics are a contrast to their dreamy, summery sound. The band is playing at Phuzz Phest, a three-day music festival in Winston-Salem next weekend that features more than 60 national and local acts.

Darryl Johnson, Black Mayors
Leoneda Inge

The mayors of some of America’s oldest all-black towns gathered at UNC Chapel Hill this week.

The conversations centered on history, race and how to keep these communities economically viable.

The gathering was almost like a family reunion.  The mayor of Hobson City, Alabama doesn’t always get to see the mayor of Mound Bayou, Miss.

“I’m Darryl Johnson, I’m mayor of the greatest city in Mississippi.  Mound Bayou, Mississippi."

Black Panthers
www.theblackpanthers.com

Documentary lovers are in downtown Durham today through Sunday for the 18th annual Full Frame Documentary Film Festival.

This year features three Center Frame documentaries, selected by a special committee.  One of this year’s featured films is “3 1/2 Minutes," by Director Marc Silver. 

The film "Cairo in One Breath" takes a look at the Adhan Unification Project.
© 2012 ON LOOK FILMS, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The adhan, or call to prayer, is a 1,400 year-old oral tradition in the process of change in Cairo, Egypt. In 2004, after generations of having muezzins—the man who calls Muslims to prayer from the minaret of a mosque—make the call, the Mubarak government decided to make a change. They began to replace Cairo's approximately 200,000 muezzins with a single radio broadcast.

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