Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Rubik’s Cube’s Puzzling Past

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

The History Lesson

One of the most popular toys in the free world was created in the unfree world.

Photo of Ernő Rubik By Babak Mansouri [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

It was 1974. In the Soviet-bloc country of Hungary, a design professor named Ernő Rubik — barely 30 and still living with his parents — made himself a little wooden gizmo: a cube, made up of a bunch of little cubes.

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Lopez, Kristina

Why Florence Foster Jenkins is one of the best worst singers ever

Emma Cline Discusses the Cult of Her Hit First Novel

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Emma Cline is author of “The Girls,” this season’s hottest literary debut. The New York Times describes it as, “A seductive and arresting coming-of-age story… told in sentences at times so finely wrought they could almost be worn as jewelry.”

Nicole Dennis-Benn Finds Trouble in Paradise

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Lately, there’s been a flowering of fiction from Caribbean writers. Jamaican-born Marlon James won last year’s Man Booker prize. Now he’s one of a chorus of voices singing the praises of his countrywoman Nicole Dennis-Benn, and her debut novel, “Here Comes The Sun.”

Image of Second Line Stompers
Gregg Gelb

Note: this program is a rebroadcast. 

Jim Gaffigan Feasts on Your Etiquette Questions

Jul 22, 2016
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Lopez, Kristina

Each week you send in your questions about how to behave, and answering them this time is Jim Gaffigan.

Over the last 20 years, he’s become one of America’s most-watched stand-up comics, with self-deprecating observations about raising five kids with his wife, and especially about his love of food. In fact, a couple years back, he published the best-selling book called, “Food: A Love Story.”

Sarah Jarosz
Scott Simontacchi / All Eyes Media

Virtuoso Sarah Jarosz, 25, has released her latest project, "Undercurrent."  It's her fourth album, despite only just recently graduating from the New England Conservatory of Music.

Photo of Yasmin Evans and her mother
Yasmin Evans

As a young Muslim-American journalist, Yasmin Bendaas pays particular attention to how Muslim women are represented in the media.

As international media coverage continues to put a spotlight on the Islamic State Group and American political rhetoric highlights religious stereotypes, Bendaas began to wonder how these representations of Islam have impacted the daily lives of Muslim-American women.

Photo from "Violet"
Jon Gardiner

In the 1960s, when a young woman named Violet has an accident that leaves her with a disfiguring scar, she sets off on a journey from her home in North Carolina to seek the help of a healing preacher in Oklahoma.

Along the way, she meets two soldiers who help in her discovery of inner beauty, and guide in her understanding of racial divides in a new era for the American South.

Movies on the Radio
Keith Weston / WUNC

For the next episode of "Movies on the Radio," The State of Things is asking, what is your favorite movie about music? 

Did you enjoy the humorous depiction of rock stars in "Almost Famous?" Were you moved by the dramatic portrait of Mozart in "Amadeus?" Do you still remember the soundtracks of "American Graffiti" and "Jaws?" Film experts Marsha Gordon and Laura Boyes will examine how movies depict musicians and the music industry and discuss memorable movie music.

Screenshot from Zootopia
BagoGames / Flickr

From Jungle Book to Jaws and Babe to The Lion King, the stars of the silver screen are often not humans but instead are our four-legged friends. Though no animal has ever won an Oscar, viewers have embraced animal actors and characters in film.

229: Farm to fork

Jul 19, 2016

This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.

Photo of Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James speaking at the ESPY Awards.
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

In the past two weeks, violence by and against police has dominated headlines and rattled the country. Protests from movements like #BlackLivesMatter continue while celebrities use speeches and social media as a platform to make their voices heard.

Meanwhile, the ESPN documentary series "O.J.: Made In America" looks at race relations since the 1960s through the life of former athlete O.J. Simpson.

Matthew Ryan
Sarah Kay

Matthew Ryan has been releasing albums for almost two-decades. In that time, he's been compared to everyone from Bruce Springsteen to U2's Bono and Tom Waits and fans of his work include Lucinda Williams.

photo of Keith Knight
Keith Knight

Knight was recently on The State of Things in advance of his appearance at the Durham Comics Fest.

Keith Knight has considered himself a cartoonist since he was in diapers, doodling on the walls of his family home near Boston.

While that spirit of creativity has not changed, the content of Keith's work has taken on more profound issues. Keith is known for drawing a weekly political cartoon called "(Th)ink" that often provides commentary on police brutality, racial profiling, and the black experience in America.

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