Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

A photo of a vintage Cheerwine delivery truck.
Courtesy of Cheerwine

It’s a big year for Cheerwine, the cherry-flavored soda with a cult-like following that has been run by the same family for 100 years.

Madeline Gray

 For Zelda Lockhart, writing is part of the healing process. She used her experience writing her own novel and leading writing workshops for other women to create a guide on writing for closure. Her new book “The Soul of the Full-Length Manuscript: Turning Life’s Wounds Into the Gift of Literary Fiction, Memoir or Poetry" (Lavenson Press Studios/2017) encourages self-expression of multiple genres to create healing for authors and the characters they create.

The Big Oops: Blunders Large and Small

May 22, 2017
Hasan Minhaj
Photo by Christian Leonard

Jessica Lee Williamson works on a routine for her school talent show.

Hasan Minhaj misses his mom when she moves back to India to attend school.

Holly Rutter does some late night grocery shopping.

Bob Zellner is curious about a movement rising in Montgomery, Alabama in the early 1960's. 

AFRICAN AMERICAN DANCE ENSEMBLE, INC.

Acclaimed dancer and choreographer Chuck Davis died earlier this month at the age of 80. Davis was considered America’s master of African dance. He formed the Chuck Davis Dance Company in New York in the 1960s and later built the African American Dance Ensemble in Durham.

Keyboardist Jonathan Lim (front left) of Washington, D.C. and music producer Brandon Collins of Raleigh explore the sounds of the synth keyboard.
Laura Pellicer / WUNC

Music producers, artists, and the future-curious explored art installations, talks, and concerts during Moogfest in downtown Durham. The festival celebrates artists who use technology to produce innovative sounds and visual art.

Mc-DeMarco.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

Along with his catchy, hazy guitar-rock, Mac DeMarco has become famous for his sense of humor… and for antics, like putting his home address at the end of a track from his mini-LP, “Another One,” and inviting fans to visit him and his girlfriend to their home.

herbivorous-butcher-brendan.jpg
Lopez, Kristina

What if we told you these two words: Vegan butchers.

Tituss Burgess Plays Matchmaker with Our Listeners

May 19, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Brendan Francis Newnam: Each week, you send in your questions about how to behave, and here to answer them this week is singer-songwriter and actor extraordinaire, Tituss Burgess.


Tituss Burgess: Hello.

Brendan Francis Newnam: I have to talk you up, though, Tituss. So give me a second here. I’m gonna-


Anne Lamott Tells Us How to Be Merciful to Ourselves

May 19, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Anne Lamott’s spunky, soul-bearing non-fiction has made her a best-selling author many times over. Her books sometimes investigate spiritual themes and sometimes they’re about very human triumphs and tribulations, like overcoming alcoholism or raising a son as a single mother.

An image of the musical trio KING
Alex King

About six years ago, twin sisters Paris and Amber Strother decided to team up with their friend Anita Bias to form the musical group KING. Little did they know the trio would soon cross paths with Prince and eventually receive a Grammy nomination. 

MIDDLE WEST MANAGEMENT

Phil Cook has become a fixture in the Triangle music scene since moving to North Carolina from Wisconsin more than a decade ago. His love for collaboration means he has lent his writing, production, and multi-instrumental skills to countless projects.

An image of Sammy Bananas playing at Moogfest in Asheville, 2014
Moogfest

Synthesizer enthusiasts, music lovers, and technophiles have descended on downtown Durham for the second Moogfest in the North Carolina city. The four-day festival from May 18 to 21 seeks to promote artists who lean on innovative technologies to produce visual and multimedia art and music.

Sound Opinions: The New Analog

May 18, 2017

In a world becoming increasingly digital, Galaxie 500 co-founder and author Damon Krukowski says we need to hang on to aspects of analog media. Damon joins hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot to talk about the value of noise, liner notes, and his book The New Analog. Plus, a review of the latest from barroom rockers Low Cut Connie, and Lydia Loveless shares the song that got her Hooked on Sonics.

www.pulitzer.org / Gigi Kaesar

When it comes to relations between the United States and Russia, it can be hard to tease out the politics from the personalities. Sovietologist and political scientist William Taubman has made this task into something of a specialty. He has studied Russian language, politics and culture for 50 years, and  is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the biography, "Khrushchev: The Man and his Era" (W.W. Norton & Co./2003).

The government's back in business with private prisons. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has reversed the Obama-era decision to phase out federal use of corporate-run prisons. On this episode, Reveal revisits an hour with Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer who takes you inside a private prison on lockdown.

Charlie Thompson / www.homeplaceunderfire.org

In the 1980s, rising interest rates, decreased farm prices, and misguided federal policies led to a crisis that hit farmers across the nation. Many farmers were either forced to sell their properties or driven to foreclose.

Chris Pizzello / AP Images

In the new Netflix series “Dear White People,” conversations about racism on a college campus take center stage. The story features members of the Black Student Union at a fictional Ivy League college called Winchester University, where the main character hosts a socially-conscious radio show. The series has received praise for featuring nuanced stories of students of color, and backlash by some who consider the show racist.

Explorers, Organizers, Interrogations

May 15, 2017

Aaron Naparstek finds an unexpected community through street traffic and poetry.
  Ann Daniels trains to become a polar pioneer.
Victor Levenstein
is interrogated by the KGB.

Karan Chopra
Photo by Caroline Lacey

David Kendall inherits his love of music from his father.

Chris Myers rides out his emotions after the birth of his daughter.

Nestor Gomez struggles to pick out his baby among a group of newborns.

Karan Chopra learns to live his life by his father's example.

Amanda Hamilton Roos confesses her sins to her father, literally.  

Jack Marmorstein realizes the role he must play in his nephew's life.

Laurent Dubois: American Songster Radio Podcast Episode 12

May 15, 2017

In 2005, Laurent Dubois had an encounter that would spark his transformation from a historian with a banjo to a historian of the banjo.  It was an unusual example of the instrument that began to deepen his curiosity—a Haitian artifact that had languished for most of its life in a museum collection.  

An image of Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz of Mandolin Orange
Alex Loops

Songs We Love is a series and a podcast that looks at the stories behind some of the songs we're playing on our new music discovery stream, WUNC Music.

For this episode, Eric Hodge sits down with Chapel Hill's Mandolin Orange to discuss their song "Wildfire" from the album Blindfaller.

"Wildfire"  is a bit more political than the average Mandolin Orange song. Andrew Marlin says that with this song he wanted to speak his mind on what racism in the South means these days.

Chuck Davis, ADF, African American Dance Ensemble
African American Dance Ensemble, Inc.

Chuck Davis, the founder of the African American Dance Ensemble died Sunday in Durham.

Courtesy Sonorous Road Productions

Raleigh Little Theatre’s “Women And War” series aims to bring audiences into the minds and experiences of women in the military community. From Vietnam-era nurses who volunteered with the Red Cross, to modern-day spouses dealing with repeated deployments and a fighter pilot who finds herself grounded by a pregnancy, the plays highlight narratives of war that often go unheard.

Courtesy of The Artist

Durham-based musician Kamara Thomas knew she wanted to be an artist at a young age. But she grew up in a Christian fundamentalist household that frowned upon artistic expression.

James Elkington – ‘Wading the Vapors’

May 12, 2017
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Lopez, Kristina

Sound Opinions: Fictional Bands

May 11, 2017

Some bands are are born, and some are just made up. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot share some of their favorite fictional bands from movies, TV, and more. Plus, a review of the new album from cartoon creation Gorillaz, and the strange story of C.W. McCall's trucker hit "Convoy."

Standing Rock and beyond

May 11, 2017

The oil protests at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation drew national attention. On Reveal, we team up with Inside Energy to go behind the scenes and meet the young people who started the fight. This upcoming hour looks at how those protests put at-risk teens on a healthier path and how other Native tribes are grappling with energy projects on their sovereign land.

arianta / Flickr

A well-executed remake film can bring a beloved story to a fresh audience. But when a remake is done wrong, it can leave faithful viewers cringing.

For the next Movies On The Radio, The State of Things wants to know what are the best and worst remake films? 

Front Country band
Big Hassle

Grab your picnic blanket and round up the kids because it's time for the start of Back Porch Music on The Lawn at American Tobacco in Durham.

Thursday night Front Country rolls into town with their genre-busting brand of roots music.  This is the first of eight in a series of concerts. 

Courtesy Monica Berra/ Soul City

Like many utopian societies, Soul City was a dream that was doomed to fail. It was the brainchild of civil rights leader Floyd McKissick who wanted to build a haven of racial equality for nearly 20,000 people. Construction for the project began in the Piedmont region of North Carolina in the 1970s, but constant bureaucratic battles led to its demise.

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