A Surprising Finding About Psychological Trauma: In Some Ways, It's Beneficial

The debilitating effects of post traumatic stress are well documented. But studies suggest that surviving trauma might also lead to personal growth.

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GDP Grew Just 0.7 Percent In First Quarter Of 2017

The U.S. economy grew at just a 0.7 percent annual rate in the first quarter of this year, according to the latest report on the gross domestic product from the Commerce Department. That's below market expectations and indicates the economy grew at the slowest pace in three years. Weak auto sales and lower home-heating bills dragged down consumer spending, offsetting a pickup in investment led by housing and oil drilling. Employment costs rose 0.8 percent in the first quarter. This "advance"...

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Tomorrow's Energy: Pricing Power

Apr 15, 2010
Electric power meter, energy
Creative Commons/Jc3s5h

Most energy consumers know what they pay for electricity.  But very few of us know why we pay what we do.  Who decides what a kilowatt should cost?  And how does energy policy change that?  In this segment of our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow’s Energy, Laura Leslie reports on the complex process of pricing power.

Energy companies are predicting that the need for power will grow in North Carolina in the coming years. With climate legislation likely, they are turning back to an energy source that has been put on the back burner for several decades… nuclear.

In February, President Obama announced 8 billion dollars in loan guarantees for a Georgia utility company hoping to build new nuclear reactors. Progress Energy and Duke Energy both have plans to also build new nuclear to serve customers in North Carolina.

Drill in N.C., Baby, Drill

Apr 14, 2010

The White House unveiled a new and controversial plan to open up more than 160 million acres of ocean floor to drilling two weeks ago. Some states were omitted from the plan, but not North Carolina and its neighbors. We’ll find out why North Carolina politicians’ once vociferous opposition to offshore drilling seems to have fizzled. Plus, will the new drilling plan help land Obama a win on climate change legislation?

Voices of SNCC

Apr 13, 2010

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was founded at Shaw University in April of 1960. Hoping to harness the enthusiasm and willpower of young people to end segregation, founders Ella Baker, James Lawson and Julian Bond organized protests and actions across the south. SNCC was vital to the impact of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Tomorrow's Energy: Quitting Coal

Apr 13, 2010

Every time you hit the light switch, half the power you use is supplied by coal.  It's one of the cheapest and most dependable fuels we have.  It's also the dirtiest.  As regulators crack down on carbon and other emissions, some say we should stop using coal altogether.  Others aren't sure that's a realistic goal.  Laura Leslie reports for our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow's Energy.

Energy companies are predicting that the need for power will grow in North Carolina in the coming years. With climate legislation likely, they are turning back to an energy source that has been put on the back burner for several decade: nuclear.

In February, President Obama announced 8 billion dollars in loan guarantees for a Georgia utility company hoping to build new nuclear reactors. Progress Energy and Duke Energy both have plans to also build new nuclear to serve customers in North Carolina.

Don de Leaumont Plays Live In Studio

Nov 20, 2009
Don de Leaumont
dononthewb.com

Singer-songwriter Don de Leaumont’s music is part storytelling, part folksy warmth and insight. In October, he released his fifth solo album, called “Planes, Trains, Crickets and Central Air.” Now a resident of Atlanta, Georgia, Don returns to his longtime home of Chapel Hill for a gig at The Cave.

He joins host Frank Stasio in the studio to play some tunes and discuss how he broke his heavy metal addiction.

Picture of Russian Duo: Terry Boyarsky & Oleg Kruglyakov
russianduo.com

The balalaika is a traditional Russian instrument with three strings and a triangular body. Oleg Kruglyakov, a native of Omsk City, Siberia, has been playing the balalaika since he was seven years old. Now, he's devoted to educating other cultures about Russian folk music and testing the limits of his instrument by teaming up with pianist Terry Boyarsky.

Cassilhaus
Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly

A love of collecting photography led Frank Konhaus and Ellen Cassilly to include an art gallery in their dream home. Then the couple decided that they wanted to do more than just display art. They wanted to build an in-home studio space for artists to create in. Cassilhaus, the name of Frank and Ellen's dwelling, fulfilled their dream. Now, invited artists from all over the world come to their home to write, paint, sculpt, dance or just generate ideas for upcoming projects.

Jewish-American Identity & Food

Mar 26, 2009

A lot of what we cook defines us. Say "barbecue and sweet tea" and people hear, "the South." The same is true for immigrants. As hyphenated Americans we are what we eat. This will be the subject of an upcoming lecture by Nora Rubel, an assistant professor of religion and classics at the University of Rochester in New York. Rubel earned her graduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and returns next week talk about "The Settlement Cookbook and the Transformation of Jewish-American Identity." But first she joins guest host Laura Leslie with a preview.

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800 962 9862 It's raining tote bags and coffee mugs! It's Fund Drive time at WUNC . Thank you for your donation today! North Carolina Public Radio is listener-supported public radio.

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Next Generation Radio

A week-long digital journalism training project designed to give participants the opportunity to report and produce their own multimedia stories. Coming to WUNC June 12-16.

On The State of Things

Elsa Loissel

When It Comes To Bird Brains, Size Doesn’t Matter

Bird brains are the size of a nut, or possibly even smaller in some cases. But a plethora of new research shows that despite their small brain size, birds are actually among the most intelligent members of the animal kingdom . “The Genius of Birds” (Penguin Books/2016) profiles a range of winged-beasts who are expert problem solvers and mappers with their own social networks and cultural traditions. Host Frank Stasio talks with science writer Jennifer Ackerman about her new book. Ackerman speaks tonight at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh at 7 p.m.

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A State Divided: HB2 and Transgender Rights

North Carolina’s bathroom bill set off a national debate about gender identity, religion, politics and power.

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Education Stories

Housing
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A new report ranks Raleigh 22nd among 50 U.S. cities in terms of housing affordability for teachers. Charlotte ranked 30th. The analysis compared average rent in each city to local teacher salaries.

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

Since at least the 1990s, partisan politics haven’t had a place in most school board races in North Carolina. Historically, just a small minority of state’s 112 school boards have been elected on a partisan basis. But that may be changing. In the last five years, the state legislature has more than doubled the number of school boards elected on party lines.

The 2017 election laid bare stark divisions between urban and rural areas of the United States, and North Carolina was no exception. While highly-regarded research universities and the creation of Research Triangle Park helped turn the state’s economy around in the 1950s, they also created an economic and political wedge that continues to grow to this day.

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