Black Panther, African Fashion, African Americans, Comic Books
Leoneda Inge

African Inspired Fashion All The Rage At "Black Panther" Opening Weekend

You can count on comic book superfans to dress-up like their favorite characters for a big movie premiere. But the opening weekend of "Black Panther" has brought out new fans and new ware. The “Afrocentric” tone of the film has many moviegoers wanting to dress the part, from African-inspired jewelry to authentic Kente cloth.

Read More

Trump Supports Improving Background Checks, But Will That Mean Action?

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET President Trump is facing calls to act in the wake of the latest mass shooting, which killed 17 people on Wednesday at a high school in Florida, and the White House is not ignoring them. The president will participate in a pair of listening sessions on school safety this week, and on Monday morning the White House said he supports efforts to improve the federal background check system, something Congress has expressed broad support for without acting on after past...

Read More

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

Raleigh is growing. That statement is not news to anyone who's tried to get across town at rush hour. More people often does mean more traffic and longer commutes. As a part of our on-going coverage of growth and sustainability -- today we begin a North Carolina Voices series that looks at how the Triangle area will meet the transportation needs of a rapidly growing population. We begin with Eric Hodge's conversation with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.

The fight between Smithfield and the United Food and Commercial Workers over unionizing the Tar Heel hog processing plant has entered a new phase. A federal judge in Virginia has allowed a lawsuit filed by Smithfield to go forward.

The suit accuses the UFCW of a coordinated public smear campaign.  It uses the RICO statutes that were created to fight organized crime. The lawsuit is the latest step in a confrontation that has slowly been moving out of the plant itself and into the kitchens and living rooms of consumers.

NC Voices: Health Of Elders

Oct 16, 2007

People are living longer now than ever before in human history. By the year 2030, more than one-in-five people in the United States will be over the age of 65. The dream is to stay healthy into a ripe old age and die peacefully in your sleep. But the reality is likely to be quite different. Many people go through a long physical and mental decline before they die. As we wrap up our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 5

Oct 16, 2007

As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care" we’ve been reporting on the remarkable rise of Type 2 diabetes. That rise is due mostly to obesity; Emily Hanford traveled to two schools in eastern North Carolina to try to find out why it's such a problem -- and what's being done about it.

NC Voices: Gene Testing

Oct 15, 2007

Since experts mapped the human genome, the continuous flow of new information has affected decisions people are making about their health. As part of our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," producer Susan Davis considers what people learn from genetic testing and if it’s always helpful. When Susan’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 experts were not sure if there was a genetic link to the disease. But now they’re sure. And there’s a test she could take to find out if she has it.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 4

Oct 15, 2007

Type-2 diabetes may be the plague of this century. Just 20 years ago, about 30 million people in the world had the disease. Today, it’s more than five times that many. It’s a frightening prospect for health, and the health care system. Here in North Carolina, diabetes is already a direct or contributing cause in one out of every five hospitalizations. That’s billions of dollars of every year. Experts say health care providers need more effective ways to treat diabetics so they don’t end up in the hospital. A group of clinics in eastern North Carolina is trying to do it with a new model for treating chronic disease.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 3

Oct 12, 2007

This week we're focusing on health care and the rise of diabetes in northeastern North Carolina. Yesterday we met Miranda Cofield, a 50 year old woman who recently lost her health insurance. She's African American, and she's poor. These factors put her at high risk of developing complications from diabetes. Statistically, Sterling Hamilton does not face the same risks.

NC Voices: Greener Hospitals

Oct 11, 2007

This week we’re examining the health care system and asking whether it actually promotes good health. Today, we look at health care facilities themselves. From toxic chemicals and medical waste, to round-the-clock energy and water use, the way hospitals are built and maintained can have serious effects on the patients inside and on the environment beyond. So as the population ages and hospital construction booms, the health care industry is examining the central creed of medicine "to do no harm" and applying it the environment too.

NC Voices: Diabetes Part 2

Oct 11, 2007

Today our look at diabetes in eastern North Carolina continues.

"Good morning, how ya doin? My name is Miranda Cofield. I live in Rich Square, NC and I am a 50 year-old patient with diabetes, type 2."

"I’m Sterling Hamilton, I live here in Conway, I’m a retired school teacher and administrator and I found out I had diabetes, Type 2, in 2000."

Sterling Hamilton and Miranda Cofield are both determined to beat their diabetes. But their experience with the disease has been very different. He gets a comfortable retirement income; she works part time as a school tutor. He has health insurance; she does not And he is white; she is black. These distinctions are significant when it comes to diabetes, and health. Emily Hanford reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Healthcare." She begins with Miranda Cofield.

Pages

WUNC Is On Instagram

On The State of Things

photo of Victor Lawe dressed as  the black panther in the studio with host Frank Stasio
Angie Perrin

‘Black Panther’: The Movie, The Madness, The Movement

Weeks before the release of "Black Panther," presale tickets were on course to outsell all other superhero movies. It was one of the most tweeted about movies of 2017, despite not having a release date until February of this year. Host Frank Stasio takes a look at the buzz behind the movie with comic book aficionados and scholars.

Read More

Hitting Home: The Opioid Crisis in North Carolina

The opioid crisis has claimed tens of thousands of lives across the country. Here's how it's playing out in North Carolina.

WUNC Music Now Playing

Ft. Bragg Stories

Share Your Ft. Bragg Story

WUNC presents a year-long series of stories about life in and around Ft. Bragg. We'd like to share your story, too.

Sustainer?

Update your Credit Card now!

Weather Forecasts & Info

Education Stories

Two university leaders signing an agreement at a wooden table
Brian Long

The North Carolina Community College System and North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities signed an agreement Thursday that could make it cheaper and easier for nursing students to earn a bachelor’s degree.

Students wearing yellow scarves for National School Choice Week
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

The General Assembly passed a bill Tuesday primarily to address issues with a prior law that reduces class sizes in kindergarten through third grade. While the measure to phase in and better fund those reductions had bipartisan support, Democrats have criticized the bill for tacking on a number of other provisions.

Photo of Carlton-LaNey teaching a class
Courtesy of Iris Carlton-LaNey

Iris Carlton-LaNey is often impressed by the resourcefulness and strength of those living in poor, underserved and rural communities. As a social worker, she has spent a career observing how many in those communities have a strong commitment to hard work, family and religion. And those are values she recognizes from her own upbringing on a tobacco farm in southeastern North Carolina, where education was valued above all. 

Third grader Dylan Ward works on a reading exercise in his classroom at Marvin B. Smith Elementary School in Burlington. Literacy is a special focus in the third grade.
Lisa Philip / WUNC

Third grader Dylan Ward says that when he goes to college, he’s going to be a “professional football player, that’s it.”

More Education News

Like & Follow WUNC

Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.