Principal Denita Dowell-Reavis stands in front of the doors to Faith Elementary, a school in Rowan County.
Liz Schlemmer / WUNC

Will NC Legislators Protect Experienced Principals From Cuts Under New Pay Scale?

This is Denita Dowell-Reavis’ second year as a principal at Faith Elementary, a public school in the small town of Faith, in Rowan County. She worked hard last year. While finishing her doctorate degree in educational leadership, she helped her school exceed its expected test scores.

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Poll: Most Americans Think Their Own Group Faces Discrimination

Majorities in many ethnic, identity and racial groups in America believe that discrimination exists against their own group, across many areas of people's daily lives, according to a poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The poll asked a wide range of questions about where Americans experience discrimination — from the workplace to the doctor's office — and people's perception of it. The groups polled include whites, blacks,...

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Dr Phyllis Crain and one of the residence counselors talks with a boy outside a cottage at Crossnore.
Rose Hoban

When you say the word ‘orphanage’ what comes to mind for many people, are gloomy places of abuse and neglect, where kids are warehoused after losing family. For years, the assumption has been that foster families provide better care for kids in need than any institution could. But new research from overseas is challenging those beliefs – findings that kids in orphanages can do as well or better as kids taken into families. Now, that research is being embraced in the U S. And it’s starting to influence the policy dialogue about what to do with kids who need care outside their homes. 

Taste Of Place

Jun 23, 2010

Certain places are known for their indigenous foods. Vidalia, Ga. grows sweet onions. The banks of the Indian River in Florida produce outstanding citrus fruits. In some cases, governments go as far as to designate these special places with geographical indications. But what makes some geographical indications associated with certain foods and drink profitable for the farmers and producers in that area? N.C.

Chaka Khan! Chaka Khan! It’s a name that just rolls off your tongue.  The famous R & B and “funk” superstar has a voice that has mesmerized fans for decades with its range and flexibility.  And who can forget the feathers and the hair!   Chaka Khan takes the stage in Durham this weekend.

Eric Hodge hosts a one-hour digest of the Energy Series stories that aired April 12-23, 2010 .

App State Profesor Dennis Scanlin and wind turbine
Dennis Scanlin

North Carolina could get most of the energy it needs as a state from renewable sources including solar and wind. That's according to a report published earlier this year by the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. But when it comes to producing wind energy that goes back into the grid, North Carolina is behind other states. In fact, there is only one utility-grade wind turbine in all of North Carolina. Jessica Jones reports for our series, North Carolina Voices:  Tomorrow's Energy.

A solar panel, renewable energy

Over the last three years, North Carolina has seen exponential growth in the use of solar power- from a few panels on homeowners' roofs to heat hot water to large installations that produce energy and send it right back into the grid. Small business owners working in the industry believe what they're doing is good for the state and for the environment. But right now, their prospects are limited. Jessica Jones reports for our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow's Energy.

Consert CEO Jack Roberts
Jack Roberts

New businesses to help save the planet are popping up everyday.  As a result, your ability to do environmental good may be closer to your finger tips than you think.  Already, there are pockets of households and businesses in North Carolina that are able to control their heaters and air conditioners online or from their smart phones.  They're living on a Smart Grid - that's becoming smarter and smarter every day.

As part of our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow's Energy, reporter Leoneda Inge has the story of one smart grid pilot project in Fayetteville.

Behind the Reporting: 'Tomorrow’s Energy'

Apr 20, 2010

If you’ve been tuned in to Morning Edition this past week or so, you’ve been hearing a series of reports about energy from WUNC’s reporters. The series, “North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow’s Energy,” addresses where North Carolinians currently get their power and where we’ll get it in the future. A lot of work goes into those six or seven-minute radio reports, which means a lot also gets left out. The melody of a coal-fired power plant and the sculptural beauty of a wind turbine are among the details of the reporting that didn’t make it on the air. On today’s show, we’ll talk with WUNC reporters Dave DeWitt, Leoneda Inge, Jessica Jones and Laura Leslie about what they took away from their reporting and what else is left to say about powering North Carolina’s future.

Durham Sustainability Manager Tobin Freid
Tobin Freid

North Carolina has topped many lists in the past few years.  It's one of the fastest growing states and ranks high for its business climate.  But in energy efficiency, NC is wading somewhere in the middle of the pack nationwide.

Universities like UNC Chapel Hill, Duke, and NC State are among the largest electricity users in the state. Some produce their own power, some buy their electricity from utility companies. And all have student bodies that are vocal in their anxiety over global warming.

As part of our series North Carolina Voices: Tomorrow’s Energy, Dave DeWitt looks at how campuses are transforming to meet their future energy challenges.


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On The State of Things

Courtesy of Kumarini Silva

Digging Into Race, Media And America: Meet Kumarini Silva

Kumarini Silva grew up in the midst of a violent civil war in Colombo, Sri Lanka between the government and rebel groups. She was mostly sheltered from the violence because of her father’s status as a U.N. diplomat, but her family still helped those they knew were in danger. They moved to Liberia when Silva was a teenager but had to leave after a few years after a violent conflict erupted inside the country.

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Ft. Bragg Stories

Share Your Ft. Bragg Story

WUNC wants to hear your stories about Ft. Bragg’s first 100 years. We’re gathering first-person accounts of life on and around the post – from the World Wars to the 21st century.

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Education Stories

My Teacher: Keeping the Class Together

20 hours ago
Kimani Hall / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series explores student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and tries to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom.

My Teacher: How We've Changed

Oct 18, 2017
Kimani Hall / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series explores student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and tries to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom.

Mladen Vouk is the N.C. State associate vice chancellor of research development
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

Across academia, faculty and graduate students perform all kinds of research. Their findings lead to new medicines, better understanding of space and time, or how the brain ticks. Universities brag about the economic impact their research has. Every year, for example, North Carolina schools bring in more than $3 billion of research funding.

UNC Athletics faced no penalty after an NCAA investigation into paper courses
Jon Gardiner / UNC-Chapel Hill

The NCAA report released Friday closes a chapter for the University of North Carolina. Here's a look at the three-and-a-half year investigation by the numbers:

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