A worker trims branches from trees near power lines in a downtown neighborhood in Orlando, Fla. during preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Irma, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017.
John Raoux / AP

Thousands Without Power After Irma Sweeps By North Carolina

Updated at 12:30 p.m., Sept. 12, 2017 Gov. Roy Cooper said about 74,000 customers are without electricity in North Carolina. Cooper told the Council of State meeting on Tuesday morning that most of the power outages are in western North Carolina and in the Charlotte area.

Read More

Hillary Clinton Is 'Done,' But Not Going Away

Hillary Clinton's final campaign for office ended in a shocking defeat. But she isn't going quietly into the night. "I think the country's at risk, and I'm trying to sound the alarm so more people will at least pay attention," Clinton told NPR. That said, her career as a candidate is over. "I'm done. I'm not running for office," Clinton said. But for those, including Democrats, who would like her to just go away? "Well, they're going to be disappointed," she said. "I'm not going anywhere. I...

Read More

NC Voices: Traditions Converge

Oct 9, 2007

Standard-issue Western health care isn’t delivering what some people want or need. They're looking for more than just another pill or procedure and piecing together medical care from several different traditions. Or, they’re bringing traditions with them from other countries. Melinda Penkava has this story for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

When Lindsay Foster Thomas landed her job as a producer for WUNC’s midday program "The State of Things," she moved from New York City to Durham with a long "to-do" list.   After finding a place to live, mapping her route to work, and checking out the best places to eat, she focused on choosing her doctors.  As part of our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," she explains her choices.

More information:

North Carolina Institute of Medicine report

In the early nineteen sixties, two young doctors from Tufts University Medical School near Boston spent a summer treating the Mississippi freedom riders. The struggle for civil rights opened the doctors’ eyes to how much minorities and the poor lacked access to health care. So they established two community health centers - one in rural Mississippi, the other in inner-city Boston. Today, those clinics- and about a thousand more across the country- provide a safety net of care to everyone who comes through the door, regardless of their ability to pay. There are one-hundred-and-six community health centers in North Carolina. Jessica Jones spent a few days at one: the Siler City Community Health Center, about an hour west of Raleigh. She reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

If you don’t have health insurance, there are places you can go to get health care. Community clinics, local health departments, state funded health centers … they often provide low-cost or even free care. But they mostly focus on the basics. What if you have a heart problem and need to see a cardiologist? Or you need an orthopedic surgeon or an endocrinologist? These kinds of specialists are expensive, and there is typically no low-cost option for people who don’t have insurance. Ten years ago, doctors in Buncombe County wanted to do something about that. And the program they created, Project Access, is now a model for other programs nationwide. Dave DeWitt reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Health Literacy

Oct 5, 2007

There are a lot of ways to get health information… from the doctor, the Internet, books, patient handouts, friends and family. But how do you know what information is best for you? Wading through and understanding it, contradictions and all, is a function of health literacy - the ability to understand and follow the doctor’s advice. Without that, even patients with good medical insurance can lose out.  Rose Hoban reports for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Skipping Health Insurance

Oct 5, 2007

The United States is the only major industrialized nation that does not provide healthcare for everyone.  47 million Americans have no insurance to help pay for trips to the doctor, medicine, or emergency surgery.  People can purchase health insurance on their own, but it's usually expensive, and a lot of people who are uninsured say they can't afford it.  So they hope they don't get sick; seek charity or low cost care when they do; and even make big life decisions based on their insurance needs.  Karen Michel reports for our series "North Carolina Voices:  Diagnosing Health Care."

NC Voices: Diagnosing Health Care

Oct 4, 2007

Ask just about anyone in the health care debate what the biggest problem is, and you’ll hear the same two words – the uninsured. One out of six North Carolinians has no health insurance- that’s more than 1.4 million people. And they’re putting a strain on the entire healthcare system. Some states are taking bold steps to reform the insurance system. But North Carolina is not among them. We asked our State Capitol Reporter Laura Leslie to find out why for our series "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care."

Many workers at the Smithfield hog processing plant in Tar Heel North Carolina continue to speak-out about what they call "bad" work conditions. But yesterday instead of just speaking-out – hundreds of workers walked out.


WUNC Is On Instagram

On The State of Things

Jocelyn Casanova
Courtesy of Jocelyn Casanova

As Trump Threatens DACA, ‘Dreamer’ Jocelyn Casanova Clings To Faith

Joceyln Casanova grew up in North Carolina and was a high achiever who dreamed of going to college and becoming a lawyer. A few days before she graduated from high school near the top of her class, a college interviewer revealed a secret her parents had kept from her her whole life: Jocelyn was undocumented.

Read More

Ft. Bragg Stories

Share Your Ft. Bragg Story

WUNC wants to hear your stories about Ft. Bragg’s first 100 years. We’re gathering first-person accounts of life on and around the post – from the World Wars to the 21st century.

Postcards From Madison County - A WUNC Special Series

Stories from kids in Western North Carolina crafted during a summer program of the Partnership for Appalachian Girls’ Education (PAGE) for girls in grades 6-9.

Flyover Sun 4-5 p.m.

Flyover, hosted by Kerri Miller, gives voice to conversations happening across the country outside of the spotlight that often shines on Washington-New York-Los Angeles.

WUNC Music Now Playing


Update your Credit Card now!

Weather Forecasts & Info

Education Stories

Supporters of the UNC Center for Civil Rights protest outside of a committee meeting of the UNC Board of Governors meeting on August 1, 2017.
Dave Dewitt / WUNC

Updated at 10:56 a.m., September 8, 2017

The UNC Board of Governors has passed a resolution that bans university-based centers from filing lawsuits. The resolution means the Center for Civil Rights, based at the UNC Chapel Hill Law School, can no longer sue on behalf of low-income and minority clients. 

My Teacher: What Do You See in Me?

Sep 7, 2017
Thornhill & Avianna
Kimani Hall / WUNC

WUNC's My Teacher Series explores student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and tries to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom.

My Teacher: Setting Up The Stage

Sep 5, 2017
Haley, Domack, and Erin
Courtesy of Tim Domack

WUNC's My Teacher Series explores student-teacher relationships across North Carolina and tries to find out what it takes to make a connection in the classroom.

A pencil and a form on a table inside a public school in Durham.
Brian Batista / For WUNC

The State Board of Education will take a final vote on Thursday on its plan for evaluating North Carolina public schools, a requirement of the Every Student Succeeds Act. The document must include grading formulas that tell parents and the federal government how well each school is educating its students.

More Education News

Like & Follow WUNC

Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.