Confederate Monuments, Charlottesville, Durham County Monument
Courtesy of Barry Yeoman

Gov. Cooper Calls For Removal Of Confederate Monuments

In comments posted online Tuesday night, Governor Roy Cooper called for the removal of all Confederate monuments from state property.

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Another Reversal: Trump Now Says Counterprotesters Also To Blame For Charlottesville

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbOr0WlA4SI Updated at 7:26 p.m. ET In a stunning reversal from comments he made just one day prior, President Trump said on Tuesday "there's blame on both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville, Va. On Monday, Trump specifically called out the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists in a choreographed statement read at the White House — but that was two days after his initial statement on the protests, for which he was criticized for not condemning those...

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Love And Gasoline

Sep 19, 2008

Love may make the world go around, but sometimes it may need a little gasoline to keep it going. North Carolina Public Radio asked listeners how the year's dramatic rise in gasoline prices has affected their personal lives.

Jan Boxill grew up playing football with her 11 siblings at a time when girls weren’t even allowed to march in the band because it was too strenuous. She went on to help found her college basketball team, and later became a college coach. For more than 20 years Jan served as the Public Address Announcer for Women’s Basketball at UNC and was even an announcer at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Alvin and Omelia Garner
Leoneda Inge

On this day - June 23, 40 years ago, the first interracial couple in Orange County was married. Alvin and Omelia Garner got their marriage license a year after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws forbidding such unions. To mark this year’s anniversary, the Garners decided to celebrate in style and have the wedding they never had.

Church of Living God2,  2007 photograph by John Rosenthal
John Rosenthal

John Rosenthal is renowned for his black and white photographs of New York City in the 1970s. The photos archived parts of the city that were vanishing and eventually disappeared: a dusty model of a ship in a bottle in the window of a social club in Little Italy, for example, or seltzer bottles stacked in wood crates.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 29, 2008

As Wake county grows, more and more major transit arteries are slowing to a crawl. Some say the answer is more roads. Others say it’s fewer cars. And Triangle commuters are literally stuck in the middle.

NC Voices: Growth & Transportation

Feb 28, 2008

As a part of our ongoing coverage of Growth and Sustainability -- this week on Morning Edition we're featuring a North Carolina Voices series on Transportation. One form of transit stands out for it’s energy efficiency, health benefits and fun – that’s people-powered transportation. But in the Triangle, that can be tough. It’s a place that’s been built primarily for cars -- and many bikers says it’s just too dangerous to consider getting to work on two wheels or feet.

A newly proposed mass transit plan for the Triangle could link Chapel Hill to North Raleigh by bus and rail as early as 2020. It’s the suggestion of a 29 member regional organization called the Special Transit Advisory Group. As it stands right now, the proposal would greatly expand local and regional bus service, and add some form of rail transit later on.

Raleigh is growing. That statement is not news to anyone who's tried to get across town at rush hour. More people often does mean more traffic and longer commutes. As a part of our on-going coverage of growth and sustainability -- today we begin a North Carolina Voices series that looks at how the Triangle area will meet the transportation needs of a rapidly growing population. We begin with Eric Hodge's conversation with Mitchell Silver, the Director of Planning for the City of Raleigh.

The fight between Smithfield and the United Food and Commercial Workers over unionizing the Tar Heel hog processing plant has entered a new phase. A federal judge in Virginia has allowed a lawsuit filed by Smithfield to go forward.

The suit accuses the UFCW of a coordinated public smear campaign.  It uses the RICO statutes that were created to fight organized crime. The lawsuit is the latest step in a confrontation that has slowly been moving out of the plant itself and into the kitchens and living rooms of consumers.

NC Voices: Health Of Elders

Oct 16, 2007

People are living longer now than ever before in human history. By the year 2030, more than one-in-five people in the United States will be over the age of 65. The dream is to stay healthy into a ripe old age and die peacefully in your sleep. But the reality is likely to be quite different. Many people go through a long physical and mental decline before they die. As we wrap up our series, "North Carolina Voices: Diagnosing Health Care," Rose Hoban takes a look at whether the health care system is ready for the coming flood of frail seniors.

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On The State of Things

Laura Pellicer

The Reluctant Farmer: Meet Reverend Richard Joyner

For close to two decades, Richard Joyner fought to get away from the farms of Pitt County, North Carolina. He grew up in a family of sharecroppers and repeatedly witnessed racial and economic injustices. His family was never properly compensated for their labor, and his father was treated poorly by white land owners.
Later in his life, Joyner became the pastor for the small 300-person community of Conetoe, North Carolina. Within one year, 30 of his congregants died from health-related...

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Education Stories

Charlotte School of Law is closed after eight months of fighting to stay open.  The North Carolina Attorney General's Office said Tuesday the for-profit school can no longer operate and, if it tries to, the department will force it to shut down. That's because the school's license has expired. 

Photo of a ball and chain with "student loans" written on it
thisisbossi / Flickr

A breakdown of education statistics shows racial disparities in student loan debt.

The left-leaning North Carolina Justice Center compiled the report from federal education data, as well as studies from the Brookings Institution and Urban Institute. 

It says black students are more likely to have student debt, and more likely to have higher balances when they graduate. 

NC Justice Center policy advocate Marion Johnson says financial support for assistance like need-based scholarships is not keeping up with demand.

Profile photo of Wendell Tabb outside WUNC Durham studios.
Courtesy Wendell Tabb

A drama teacher has sued his North Carolina public school district for racial discrimination in staffing and unfair compensation.

North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

Volunteers are at the ready to help carry luggage and bedding at North Carolina A&T University's new student move-in on Friday.

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Reporting on the lives of American military personnel and veterans.